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View Poll Results: Where do you stand now?

Voters
132. You may not vote on this poll
  • I am a newbie or not far removed from being one.

    11 8.33%
  • I can identify several notes and understand at least some of the genres.

    82 62.12%
  • I can identify all the major notes and have sampled a few hundred frags (or more).

    39 29.55%
  • I can't imagine knowing much more about frags than I do now.

    0 0%
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Results 31 to 41 of 41
  1. #31

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    I'm learning more by sheer volume of exposure, I think. I just try and smell every scent possible.
    Sell/Trade-- Issey Miyake(Summer '09)~Calvin Klein(One Summer '07 & '09)~Eau De Grey Flannel

    Buy/Swap-- http://www.basenotes.net/threads/250...e-Want-Edition.

  2. #32

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    If you want to learn about development over time, just spend $1 on Jean Philipe's version of Obsession for Men. It starts out with lavender, geranium, a spice note, and a green note but then within an hour or so the base emerges, which is amber/benzoin, possibly with some vanilla and spice.

  3. #33

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    Somewhere between 2 and 3 on the list, and always up for learning more.

    Is there a scent school or program somewhere where we can go to have education in fragrance? Serious question - anyone know of actual formal education programs in fragrance? Maybe a textbook or two?

  4. #34

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    Not to toot my own horn, but I'm actually good with individual notes. Problem is that more than 50% of the time.. notes produce a different smelling accord, which is what will confuse anyone's nose.

    Of course some notes are easier to detect than others like say vanilla, as opposed to something like bamboo.
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 8th April 2010 at 03:15 AM.

  5. #35

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    I will say thanks to this site and its members & their reviews, I know a whole lot more than the average guy asking an SA about AdG.

  6. #36

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    I marked myself a 2, though I may be more of a 1 still. I have been a member for about two years and have posted little, though I've read (and sampled [and blind bought]) a lot throughout that time. My goal, originally, was just to find something to finish off my morning shaves in style, but my appreciation for a wider variety of genres continues to grow, as does my ability to recognize notes and accords. However, I still have a very limited range of experience compared to most members. I think from here on out, my focus will be on sampling for the sake of learning rather than trying to find new bottles to buy. I have settled in with a collection of about 10 scents that I wear regularly, and I could see having a handful of others if I find some that are both striking and wearable enough to warrant it.
    On the other hand, I may have to quit coming here altogether, as my addictive and OC tendencies often drive me to unintended purchases when I poke around here too much. In that case, my ability to learn will be greatly hindered without the sounding board and shared wisdom of the BN community.

    Regards,
    T

    My Wardrobe:
    Yves St. Laurent Live Jazz
    Comme des Garcons Vettiveru
    Czech & Speake Oxford & Cambridge
    Creed Green Irish Tweed
    Comme des Garcons 2 Man

  7. #37

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    Definitely a #2! I love trying out a fragrance and being able to pick out certain notes and know why I like or certain fragrance or why I don't. I think I may be coming close to my hundredth sampled fragrance!

  8. #38

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cologneist View Post
    Not to toot my own horn, but I'm actually good with individual notes. Problem is that more than 50% of the time.. notes produce a different smelling accord, which is what will confuse anyone's nose.

    Of course some notes are easier to detect than others like say vanilla, as opposed to something like bamboo.
    This is a good point. What I meant is that you can pick out notes in a fragrance, which, as you say, is often blended and not easy to discern. The most obvious example is the fougere accord, where the aficionado knows that it's lavender and coumarin/tonka. Of course, how you learned it is another question. Some might use the note pyramid and the reviews to acquire such knowledge.

  9. #39

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    I voted #3. Honestly, the only reason I can vote #3 and not #2 is because a few years ago I spent a significant amount of money acquiring a huge number of natural essences ( > 150 different oils/absolutes, etc ). This let me learn what the oils and extracts smelled like in isolated form, although an important caveat is that often these extracts do not smell like the living plant and hence may not be an accurate representation of the note in question. Rose absolutes, for instance, do not smell like a living rose, instead smelling more winey, peppery, decayed, with hints of pickle, etc (qualities heavily dependent upon their location of cultivation and the quality of the extraction itself.)

    That is why, when I do my detailed breakdowns of scents, I will usually say, "this smells like X oil" if I find it smells like the oil moreso than the note in nature. In Reflection Man, for instance, I get a very strong orris butter note presence, which is different than the scent of the iris flowers (the ones that actually have any scent). To break it down even further, Reflection utilizes an orris with a lot of ionones which give it a very sweet and shimmering effect, with undertones of raspberries or even hints of grape.

    Despite knowledge of individual notes, anyone with any blending experience realizes how quickly notes get lost in the mix, and how two (or more) notes can blend together seamlessly into what appears to be an entirely unique third (and only) note. A tiny bit of fennel seed oil + ylang ylang extra + lavender oils + absolute + a hint of jasmine and beeswax absolute can combine to make a fairly convincing lilac accord (ok, a fairly basic lilac accord, but a start).

    Creating new or novel accords is interesting and definitely a large part of perfumery, but I think the true art lies in the way accords and phases of development are woven together. It is very very difficult to have three or more distinct stages in a perfume with seemingly disparate notes and yet to unify the composition seamlessly. It can even be very difficult to make a seemingly linear scent, depending upon the aromachemicals present for the accord you wish to achieve. Creating a long lasting lemon note, for instance, may be very difficult if there are no lemony basenotes available to a perfumer (i'm not aware of all the aromachemicals available so I don't know if this is actually true, but it seems like it must be as there are few long lasting lemon scents). Instead, a bit of illusion and trickery is required. If you can get a note that is "lemon like" (eg: immortelle oil has a lemon like note along with its tea-like characteristics. Keep in mind I'm talking about the essential oil steam distilled from the immortelle flower and not the absolute which produces the maple syrup like note) and then utilize some other notes to "hide the seam" where the lemon notes (say lemon, litsea cubeba, and lemon verbena) fade out, the wearer may perceive this as one long lasting lemon note that is just changing ever so slightly, while in fact all of the lemon oil is long evaporated.

    The amount of balance required to create interesting scents that are not too sweet, too cloying, too dirty, etc. and that have no notes jutting out in truly unpleasant ways (but perhaps have a note here or there jutting out just a little to create some interesting tension or contrast) is truly very very difficult. Perfumery is hard. Perfumers should be respected!

    I've learned a LOT since working on my own perfumes, and realized just how much there is to learn. It's both daunting and exciting. This is a hobby that will remain interesting lifelong. If you start to get bored with the hobby, consider delving deeper down the rabbit hole. You have no idea just how deep it is!
    ***For sale:

    Iris Pallida 50ml

    Ungaro I 75ml

    and more!
    - http://www.basenotes.net/threads/301...n-Man-and-more

  10. #40
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    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    I put myself down as #2, while it could easily haver bee #1 or even #3.
    In my time here, I've found that not only am I very limited, (and I knew that before I started), but that there are many truly wonderful scents that do nothing for me at all. And that judgement of doing nothing for me clouds my ability to either describe or understand a scent.
    While my nose is improving at this stage I will not post reviews, I am simply too biased and ignorant.
    Last edited by dacha; 9th April 2010 at 12:51 AM.

  11. #41

    Default Re: Where do you now stand in your understanding of frags?

    SoS your post is extremely interesting. I have a "nose" for scent but am in the early stages of developing a sense of how to blend. There is so much to learn! One thing I can add (which may seem pedantic, but from my experience is not) is that if you are in the process of creating scent and get caught up in the moment, you need to pull yourself back a little and record everything. If you create a non-re-createable masterpiece... and you're okay with that, well, that is fine... but I believe that most of us want to be able to come up with that magical formula again and again. I have a few intriguing but one-off scents that I WISH I knew the proportions of ingredients for!
    Actias luna's fragrance reviews | Now blogging with AromiErotici, Carrie Meredith, Mimi Gardenia, Sugandaraja, Asha, bluesoul, shamu1, Redneck Perfumisto and Daly Beauty at Il Mondo di Odore
    Art: Actias luna's other hobby
    - along with some impromptu "performance writing" here on Basenotes!

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