Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Test Strips

  1. #1

    Default Test Strips

    This is something that's a little more in depth that I've always been curious about. I notice when you spray a fragrance on those test strips, the top notes seem to last pretty long. In fact.. most of the time I just get the top notes and then it fades to a lighter version of what came out. But, even when it doesn't and it develops on the paper, I notice the top notes to last insanely long. Take Nicole Miller for example. Here's a fragrance that's notorious for having one of the shortest phases of top notes.. the apple opening lasts about 20 seconds before it changes. But when I saw it out and sprayed it on a test paper, I noticed the apple opening to hang on much much longer.

    So what I'm wondering is, are those test papers made to hold top notes, and confuse the buyer? Are they maybe infused with oil? It's not impossible, and I may be sounding paranoid, but I notice when I spray a fragrance at home on some paper, the scent doesn't last very long; but when I do it on those test strips out.. those things can cling to them for hours and hours. I guess I'd have to do a test with one of my fragrances at home, and get some of those strips from Kohl's or something where they leave them out.

    Anyone else notice this?
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 21st May 2010 at 05:29 PM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Test Strips

    I guess there COULD be some weird perfume industry test strip conspiracy, but my explanation would have been just that they're made of particularly heavy, absorbent paper, and that the top notes hang around because the strips don't get as warm as human skin does.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Test Strips

    I don't buy based on a spray on paper. I don't wear my scents on paper, after all. Fragrance is meant to be experienced on the skin or clothing.

    I was interested in a sample from Jo Malone, but all the SA could muster for me was a sprayed strip of paper.

    No, thank you.
    "No sweet perfume ever tortured me more than this." Desert Rose by Sting and Cheb Mami, Album 1999.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Test Strips

    There's no oil or anything special with the strips - it's just because they're thick card stock that they hold on to scent longer than a random piece of paper at home. If you need some for use at home, accessories for fragrances has packs of 100 for 7.99 (I have those on hand at home).
    I'm a colognosaurus. Rawr!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Test Strips

    A lot of people (me included) get duped into buying a frag based on paper testing. I am sure the frag companies are aware of this but to the average consumer it's the top notes that are important so that's how they make their profit. I have sprayed my frags at home on regular writing paper and yes I do notice a difference in top notes longevity. But I don't think the frag counters use some kind of special paper because when I spray a frag on thicker more absorbent paper (eg. business cards), I get the same results as the the test strips.
    "A parent's only as good as their dumbest kid. If one wins a Nobel Prize but the other gets robbed by a hooker, you failed."

  6. #6
    DeepSilence
    Guest

    Default Re: Test Strips

    It's true. when you test it with tissue, you will get another result. test papers are more thick and different with normal papers. Test paper is similar to Glass Paper IMO

  7. #7

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Thanks guys. I've never really done the paper testing until recently, so I wasn't sure.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cologneist View Post
    This is something that's a little more in depth that I've always been curious about. I notice when you spray a fragrance on those test strips, the top notes seem to last pretty long. In fact.. most of the time I just get the top notes and then it fades to a lighter version of what came out. But, even when it doesn't and it develops on the paper, I notice the top notes to last insanely long. Take Nicole Miller for example. Here's a fragrance that's notorious for having one of the shortest phases of top notes.. the apple opening lasts about 20 seconds before it changes. But when I saw it out and sprayed it on a test paper, I noticed the apple opening to hang on much much longer.

    So what I'm wondering is, are those test papers made to hold top notes, and confuse the buyer? Are they maybe infused with oil? It's not impossible, and I may be sounding paranoid, but I notice when I spray a fragrance at home on some paper, the scent doesn't last very long; but when I do it on those test strips out.. those things can cling to them for hours and hours. I guess I'd have to do a test with one of my fragrances at home, and get some of those strips from Kohl's or something where they leave them out.

    Anyone else notice this?
    It`s not the paper, it`s just that there is difference between the developing of scents on skin and on fabrics and papers. Fabrics and papers don`t have heat, so they don`t intefere with the evaporation of the notes so much. A fragrance is in it`s basic definition a chemical mixture, and chemical elements do have their properties affected by heat. So, the heat of your skin helps to evaporate more quickly the topnotes, that are the most volatile notes in the fragrance. And this is why, on paper, that doesn`t have heat, not only the top notes last longer, but the scent last more too.
    I think that the companies invest more on top notes, that are the notes that will catch the usual shopper, giving you common and banal basenotes that makes a lot of fragrances smell so similar.
    If you want to make the topnotes last longer on you, you have to spray the fragrance on fabric.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Not only the topnotes are affected. Some fragrances, if you notice, have completely different accents from fabrics to skin, due to the body`s heat that makes the fragrance develop different than on skin. That`s why sometimes a fragrance that smells wonderful on paper is not as good on you and vice versa. So it`s always important to test the fragrance on skin, because not only the heat, but your skin chemistry also influences on the development on skin. At this point I disagree with Luca Turin when he says that a fragrance cannot smell different from a person to another. I understand that the conditions of the place the fragrance is sprayed influence it`s smell overall.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Test Strips

    I have never liked this way of sampling at all.....Cards do no justice to the fragrance.....The only real way to sample is to get the scent on the skin.....I also prefer to spray a sample than to splash on a sample from the little vials that are handed out.....The spray vial application is better in my opinion.....Gary

  11. #11

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Thanks Rick, as for Turin, that's another story all together. I actually do agree with him. If 2 people were wearing Le Male standing side by side, they would smell the same to my nose, there wouldn't be 2 versions unless they were in different phases whether top middle or base. This would be the way that my nose understands the smell of Le Male. Others may smell it differently than I do, but the smell itself no matter whose skin it touches stays the same in my opinion. Everything other than that just varies from nose to nose.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cologneist View Post
    Thanks Rick, as for Turin, that's another story all together. I actually do agree with him. If 2 people were wearing Le Male standing side by side, they would smell the same to my nose, there wouldn't be 2 versions unless they were in different phases whether top middle or base. This would be the way that my nose understands the smell of Le Male. Others may smell it differently than I do, but the smell itself no matter whose skin it touches stays the same in my opinion. Everything other than that just varies from nose to nose.
    I don`t agree because the skin affects and the scent will smell different. It`ll not transform in something that is not Le Male, for example, but the scent will have different emphasis on some notes, and if this notes are the most noticeable notes for your nose, you`ll perceive the fragrance as a different one. And I don`t say of different times of application, since I`ve already made some tests. On my brother in law, for example, Kingdom is very sweet and the cummin is barely noticeable, while on my is big on rose and cummin.
    So I believe that yes, it`s different. It`s not only the nose, since if your nose smell the same fragrance on you and in another person, what can explain that you perceive the scent differently? And sometimes the difference is big.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    I don`t agree because the skin affects and the scent will smell different. It`ll not transform in something that is not Le Male, for example, but the scent will have different emphasis on some notes, and if this notes are the most noticeable notes for your nose, you`ll perceive the fragrance as a different one. And I don`t say of different times of application, since I`ve already made some tests. On my brother in law, for example, Kingdom is very sweet and the cummin is barely noticeable, while on my is big on rose and cummin.
    So I believe that yes, it`s different. It`s not only the nose, since if your nose smell the same fragrance on you and in another person, what can explain that you perceive the scent differently? And sometimes the difference is big.
    It's a topic that's easier to show than to speak of. You'd have to put each theory to the test with a group of people to see what's unanimous for provable results I believe.

    This is the reason why some fragrance reviews may be all over the place. I know people who get chocolate from Le Male while others get vanilla. But this is what they get from it on their own nose. If somebody wearing Le Male walked by me, I would be able to say "He's wearing Le Male" based on the sillage and smell. Only the more familiar fragrances to me -- can I do this with. The only time it may smell different is on test strips.

    This is a very very very subjective topic indeed, I would love to test the theory on a group of people.
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 21st May 2010 at 08:29 PM.

  14. #14
    DeepSilence
    Guest

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    Not only the topnotes are affected. Some fragrances, if you notice, have completely different accents from fabrics to skin, due to the body`s heat that makes the fragrance develop different than on skin. That`s why sometimes a fragrance that smells wonderful on paper is not as good on you and vice versa. So it`s always important to test the fragrance on skin, because not only the heat, but your skin chemistry also influences on the development on skin. At this point I disagree with Luca Turin when he says that a fragrance cannot smell different from a person to another. I understand that the conditions of the place the fragrance is sprayed influence it`s smell overall.

    How is writing on Glass Paper? If you write something with pen, after an hour, if you rub the ink, probablely it distribute on paper! Why? beacause the paper didn't let to ink to vaporize. and it's still wet. vice versa in usual paper, maybe after just 1-2 minutes, it will be dry. Chemistry of skin and heat of body affect , but not this too much for keeping the top note.
    Last edited by DeepSilence; 21st May 2010 at 08:40 PM.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Quote Originally Posted by Hamid View Post
    How is writing on Glass Paper? If you write something with pen, after an hour, if you rub the ink, probablely it distribute on paper! Why? beacause the paper didn't let to ink to vaporize. and it's still wet. vice versa in usual paper, maybe after just 1-2 minutes, it will be dry. Chemistry of skin and heat of body affect , but not this too much for keeping the top note.
    I disagree with this, because in this case you`re comparing the skin absorption with the paper absortion. This also affects but the projection of the scent on your skin is hugely affected because of the heat, that is the main factor in chemical reactions that makes the alcoohol blend evaporate. If you have more heat, then the evaporation process will occur fastly, especially with aromachemicals that aren`t so dense, and the aromachemicals in the topnotes are usually the less denser ones of the composition, and that`s why they develop faster and leave place for the consequently aromachemicals to be perceived on skin. The heat makes the evaporation faster. You can do an experience, spray a fragrance on your arm, wait the skin absorb the fragrance and then wash the place on hot water. You`ll see that the fragrance will speed to the basenotes. So the heat of the place where the fragrance is sprayed is very important. Of course, this won`t make a top note to last more than it would last, but it`ll help it slowly evaporate from skin.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Test Strips

    I´m convinced that the material of the teststrip has a little influence on the scent-experience, too. When comparing thicker teststrips to thinner and probably cheaper ones, I´ve always liked the result on the thicker ones more. Don´t know why, maybe it´s just me Teststrips are useful, but I would never buy a fragrance I haven´t sampled on skin (again)though.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Actually Rick, I take back what I said.. because I sometimes find a fragrance to smell different on me than how i once remembered it. Actually this is pretty common whether with small changes or large ones. It's arguable whether or not it's olfactory fatigue, but if the fragrance smells completely different than it once did, I guess it isn't so much olfactory fatigue. Still the topic itself is debatable and varies fragrance to fragrance really, but you certainly raise a good point.

  18. #18
    Basenotes Institution
    Mimi Gardenia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Exactly Where I Should Be
    Posts
    16,346

    Default Re: Test Strips

    I dislike sampling on test strips- I don't get a true idea of a fragrance that way at all. I notice some SAs think it very peculiar that I should want to actually test on my skin.
    It is like.... all I want is to get a freebie perfume spray for the day. Stange but true. I have to ask constantly to be sprayed on my skin ,not test paper.
    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/370...o-Profumo-Onda
    For sale. Carnal Flower and Vero Profumo Onda.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Quote Originally Posted by Primrose View Post
    I don't buy based on a spray on paper. I don't wear my scents on paper, after all. Fragrance is meant to be experienced on the skin or clothing.

    I was interested in a sample from Jo Malone, but all the SA could muster for me was a sprayed strip of paper.

    No, thank you.
    I've learned this lesson the hard way.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cologneist View Post
    Actually Rick, I take back what I said.. because I sometimes find a fragrance to smell different on me than how i once remembered it. Actually this is pretty common whether with small changes or large ones. It's arguable whether or not it's olfactory fatigue, but if the fragrance smells completely different than it once did, I guess it isn't so much olfactory fatigue. Still the topic itself is debatable and varies fragrance to fragrance really, but you certainly raise a good point.
    I can say that you and me are right, because yes, a fragrance cannot smell beyond the components that it carries and that it really depends of the nose who interprets it, but my impression is that your skin can make some notes more proeminent than others. And it really varies from fragrance to fragrance, that are fragrances that don't change so much, and that are ones that really varies from skin to skin.
    I've noticed that my skin influences a lot in the fragrance smell and longevity because I've take for some months some medicine to cure my acne and reduce the oiliness of my skin. After the treatment, I noticed that some of my fragrances were different on me and that they were also lasting more than in the past. Because of this I believe that skin is an important factor of the smell. The skin to me stand for the canvas where an art is painted.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Test Strips

    Slightly off topic, but does anyone else HATE the Creed test cards? I swear I can smell the thick material and ink they use on them, and it colors my interpretations of the scents.
    I refuse to sink.

Similar Threads

  1. smelling strips
    By pg in forum Fragrance DIY
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 7th February 2014, 10:00 PM
  2. Help w/ glassine envelopes for test strips
    By Nostalgie in forum General Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27th April 2010, 08:28 PM
  3. Scratch & Sniff Strips
    By ECaruthers in forum General Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 3rd July 2009, 03:20 PM
  4. Perfume on paper strips- Why?
    By kumquat in forum General Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 6th December 2008, 06:37 PM
  5. Paper tester strips...
    By Scentronic in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27th November 2006, 01:57 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000