Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Neurosis's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    I don't have the accent, Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,459
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default What defines "gourmand"?

    ive heard so many different things, like...

    1. "it smells edible" - makes the most sense, but thats extremely subjective. but the problem i see, atleast to me, is that any citrus scent is a gourmand then. lemons, oranges, and limes are all foods, no?
    2. contain a coffee note - yeah its technically food, but (i know someone will say they do this, but its not "common" per say) most people dont eat coffee straight up
    3. contains chocolate - makes sense too, but ive yet to smell straight up chocolate in any "gourmands". the closest ive gotten is a dark chocolate smell at some point in A*Men's drydown

    if im missing anything, dont hesitate to tell me

  2. #2

    Default Re: What defines "gourmand"?

    Gourmand is a sweety note that you would eat (candy, fruity, vanilla, chocolate...) but there is multiple declinaison depending the perfume. I don't think you can defines it with a particular coffee note (for example), it's more an overall impression.

  3. #3
    Heartwood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    2,310
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: What defines "gourmand"?

    Gourmand to me is, as Mon-Petit says above, an overall impression. And it can be subjective, but generally anything that seems sweet and "foody" to you can be considered gourmand. Vanilla and/or fruit with spices (like anise or cinnamon). Coconut. Chocolate, certainly, lends this quality. For more chocolaty scents, you might check out Tom Ford Black Orchid and Sarah Jessica Parker Covet. Covet isn't necessarily gourmand to me, as it's mostly a vivid green floral with some chocolate, to my nose. I dislike it, and most all scents with chocolate, actually. I'd call it gourmand if there was vanilla and perhaps some fruit in it as well, but Covet is floral rather than foody, and it isn't sweet, which it should be to be considered gourmand. I agree that coffee-based scents can be gourmand if there's notable sweetness going on too. Other fragrances besides Black Orchid that seems to define gourmand are Lolita Lempicka Au Masculin and Tierry Mugler's Angel.

    Gourmand is a very new classification, within the last ten to fifteen years or so. Angel was one of the very first to explore scent with these edible notes of vanilla, fruit, and chocolate. Citrus doesn't qualify as a gourmand because citrus has been a standard note in perfumery for hundreds of years. Ditto herbaceous scents with notes of rosemary or lavender. Sure, you can eat them if you wanted to. You can eat rose petals too. But citrus, herbs, and florals in perfumery are already long-established families in their own right, evoking a definite olfactory reaction rather than a gustatory response. Gourmand is usually more dessert-like and definitely sweet or even syrupy.

    Anyway, just go sniff some of the ones I mentioned above and I'm sure you'll get that, "Ah, ha!" moment. If possible, check out some Serge Lutens like Arabie and Louve as well. No chocolate, but definitely foody and dessert-like, and definitely belong in the gourmand category as well, imo.
    Eddie: Sweetie, what are you drinking?
    Patsy: Oh, this? Chanel No. 5.
    -- Absolutely Fabulous

  4. #4
    Neurosis's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    I don't have the accent, Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,459
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: What defines "gourmand"?

    ahh, okay i think it get you. that explains why i always considered Hollister's SoCal (pineapple, coconut) a gourmand, even before i really got into fragrances.

    im still waiting for the pancake gourmand, that will be my signature scent hahaha

  5. #5
    Tarheel Golfer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,599
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: What defines "gourmand"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Neuroticcheese View Post
    im still waiting for the pancake gourmand, that will be my signature scent hahaha
    I never thought of this one as a gourmand, but one day I oversprayed Nautica Blue and my wife told me I smelled like burnt pancakes. It pained me to realize she was right.

Similar Threads

  1. What is the definition of a "gourmand" fragrance?
    By acehimself in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 18th December 2013, 10:54 PM
  2. The best "sweet Gourmand" scent for men?
    By afraafra in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 82
    Last Post: 5th November 2012, 04:15 PM
  3. What quality defines an "aromatic" fragrance?
    By Scentronic in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 8th April 2009, 11:15 AM
  4. Should Burger King's "Flame" be classified Gourmand?
    By beltz in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 23rd December 2008, 05:08 PM
  5. need advice - wanting a make a change to a "niche" gourmand/musk fragrance
    By cmartin1 in forum Female Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 17th January 2008, 12:31 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •