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  1. #1

    Default How many drops do you put in your mls? I'm getting different results...

    I'm in a really analytical mood tonight... anyone with any patience for me?

    I read somewhere that the industry standard was
    20 drops for a ml.
    100 drops for 5ml.
    300 drops for 15ml.
    600 drops for 30ml (ounce)

    I've also read elsewhere that typically 30 drops is a ml. and I'm getting 44.
    This is quite an important matter to me because I am a way through diluting all my oils to 10%.
    I started doing this by counting the drops of both carrier and EO, so there wasn't a problem there, and i don't have a problem if I syringe measured doses of both.
    The problem arises if I measure in mls with the carrier and then drop in with the EO's.

    We did some experiments in the bathroom with the bathwater.
    The dripping tap, water - 20 drops = 3.2mls
    The dripping syringe, water - 44 drops = 1ml
    The dripping syringe, oil - 44 drops = 1ml
    The dripper bottle, EO - 36 drops = 1ml

    Also the brown bottles actually take 13mls altogether, not 10ml unless one is supposed to leave a large gap for the air and the dripper to work well.

    So if i've bought a little brown 10ml bottle, which are usually FULL of essential oil diluted to 10% and it's an expensive one, how many drops of the actual 100% oil might I be getting in there?

    Does the drop depend on the dropper end size? But you don't get 5" wide drops from big pipes????

    I'm feeling anxious in case I have done mine twice as strong as anyone else.
    What do you guys do? Can we see if we can reach a consensus on this, and I will copy Mr norm?

  2. #2

    Default Re: How many drops do you put in your mls? I'm getting different results...

    If you're concerned about accurate measurements, why not just get some calibrated measuring pipettes? They would make life a lot easier.

    If you're just making perfumes for yourself and your friends and have no need to replicate them precisely over and over again, then accurate measurements aren't as important as what your nose tells you is right.
    Last edited by Doc Elly; 10th June 2010 at 06:43 AM.
    Blog: www.perfumenw.blogspot.com
    Website: Olympic Orchids Artisan Perfumes http://orchidscents.com.

  3. #3

    Default Re: How many drops do you put in your mls? I'm getting different results...

    I'd just use a scale. The different viscosities make measuring by drops pointless, imo. Measure by weight when making your dilutions. After the dilution there will be a much smaller difference in drops per ml due to viscosity, as the viscosities will be much more uniform, so then measure by drops.
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  4. #4

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    Default Re: How many drops do you put in your mls? I'm getting different results...

    Measuring by drops is indeed an exercise in frustration. Like SculptureOfSoul, I think you need a scale. When I first started working with a scale, I found that "drops" could be anywhere from about 25 per ml to about 45 per ml (and mostly I found they were closer to 40 per ml); no wonder my creations always seemed so weak. And I too started making dilutions of my raw materials to use in my experiments. For most ingredients, I make a 10% "perfume" to use in my blends. The advantage of this is that if you work this way, you can smell your creation immediately as opposed to mixing oils and then diluting in alcohol, where it takes a couple of weeks following dilution to get the full effect.
    Last edited by JonB; 26th June 2010 at 04:45 PM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: How many drops do you put in your mls? I'm getting different results...

    The down side of working with everything in 10% dilution is that you can never make a scent that is more concentrated than that. I like to start with the pure mix of raw materials because I use it straight in soap (25-30 ml/kg soap), at 30% for perfume, 20% for EdP, etc, so one concentrate serves many purposes.

    I don't think it matters much whether you do your measurements by weight or volume (forget drops) as long as you are consistent. What matters is the ratios that you arrive at (based on either method).
    Blog: www.perfumenw.blogspot.com
    Website: Olympic Orchids Artisan Perfumes http://orchidscents.com.

  6. #6

    Default Re: How many drops do you put in your mls? I'm getting different results...

    So far I am only using the 10% for experiments and recipe trials. It just saves expensive waste if I make a complete horlix of it. If not, I then have a basic formulaic recipe in theory, assuming the drop system works in small quantities, I can then make it again in the same ratio with the stronger stuff using the alcohol if I want it. Not that I've made anything that merits it yet. Nor do i know if I'm on the right track yet. Maybe one or two are going that way.

  7. #7

    Default Re: How many drops do you put in your mls? I'm getting different results...

    Here is an interesting site with some experiments and hints on drops:

    http://www.weekendperfumer.com/2010/...different.html

    and http://www.weekendperfumer.com/2010/...oil-drops.html

    This site also describes another way of testing perfume ideas, by a type of 'air blending':

    http://www.weekendperfumer.com/2009/...technique.html

    I tried it out on several blends and it works really well to get a rough idea of whether certain blends will work or not, for a perfuming brain storm say. You will need considerable fine-tuning afterwards, but it helps to wield out combinations that really don't work and can save quite a bit of time. It is also fun as you can remove and then reintroduce components in many combinations and strengths. I found the method unsuitable to evaluate the dry-down of a blend, which is highly distorted in the 'air blending method', but it works for the initial impression.

  8. #8

    Default Re: How many drops do you put in your mls? I'm getting different results...

    I may have a go at the cocktail stick method. How long do they stay fragrant for though? Would the age of the perfumed stick lessen its effect in the overall aroma? I ask because it looks like it would take a long time and a lot of fiddle to set this up.

    At the moment with my EO's diluted to 10% in frac. coconut oil, I do blends in small vials and test them on myself. If it doesn't work out, the waste gets put into a mille fleurs container till it smells nice enough to use for some bath salts or something. If it does work, I have a little vial or a few to give as samplers for others opinions on that blend. I have a strong feeling I've rather a way to go in the learning curve before I need to worry about Chanel level perfection.....

  9. #9

    Default Re: How many drops do you put in your mls? I'm getting different results...

    They stay fragrant for several hours, more than enough for experimentation. You can use dilutions (e.g., 10%) or different lengths of immersion (2 mm or 15 mm) to investigate the balance of possible accords (very roughly of course). I am using so called tapas sticks which I get from the local super market (in the Netherlands: Albert Heijn). They already have a flat part where you can write a letter or number, so there is no need for paper labels. Measuring and marking the lengths takes only a minute. Then I write A, B, C, etc. Next you dip to a certain length, recording somewhere that A = Bergamot, B = Seaweed Abs 50%, etc. I then take the combinations I am interested in most and put them in a small plastic beaker. Wait a few seconds and voila, you get a good impression of how well they blend. The 'air blending' really works fast and is a good indication of how the components will interact. The whole process only takes a few minutes, about the same as when measuring by weight or with drops. The advantages are that you need only minute quantities and that you can remove a component that does not work. Sometimes, a bit of the removed component remains in the beaker, in which case I move all the sticks to a new one and throw out the old beaker. These are cheap beakers, which only cost a few cents. Once I have gained confidence in some blend, I will then create it by weight, let it sit for a few weeks, and then evaluate it. Like I said, the stick method is great for perfume "brain storming" and does not replace the more conventional approach.

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