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  1. #1

    Default Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    Currently at work, probably 50% of what I'm seeing is swine flu. (I refuse to call it H1N1 flu, as this is a misnomer. Half of the previous year's influenza A virus was also H1N1, so it was confusing to rename the swine flu "H1N1," but that is a discussion that should probably take place elsewhere.)

    Anyway, so I've been spraying all my equipment down with Lysol, until I am about to puke. I hate and have always hated the smell of Lysol, in all its scent incarnations.

    Does anyone know of any other disinfecting sprays that are more pleasant in odor?

    I thought about making some homemade alcohol sprays, but Everclear will denature some of the parts of the equipment that I use. And bleach just doesn't dry fast enough.
    "Embrace those things which give you pleasure, after all, there is so much mediocrity to endure elsewhere." -- Inselaffe

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    How do you want to use this? Air, your skin, surfaces, are the surfaces wood, metal, glass?

  3. #3

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    I use Oust unscented to kill odors and bacteria in the air, if it works well enough for that, it should work on surfaces too. I noticed they have a new one that mentions air and surface, but forget what scent it is. On telephones, door knobs, etc, you can use an antibacterial handwash that contains alcohol. You could also find a natural cleaner that uses grapefruit seed oil.
    Last edited by beachroses; 7th October 2009 at 09:55 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    As someone who has had swine flu, I would recommend you just bite the bullet and lick the face of someone who has it. I'll be honest, it wasn't *that* bad. Obviously it wasn't the laugh-a-minute experience that I was hoping for, but compared with standard seasonal flu it was longer-lived but definitely milder.

    There are also other advantages to having it - although you can always catch it again, you should still have some antibodies floating around. Plus you get some time off work, which no-one can argue about (largely because they don't want to be infected), and you get to lie on your sofa.

    In all seriousness though, and only minutely off-topic, I wouldn't bother trying to kill any and all bacteria in your immediate vicinity. It's a futile exercise, and reflects an unfortunate tendency in modern western society to believe that we can kill all bacteria and live life without illness. In reality, what it means is that our children have the immune systems of dead cats, and end up with horrendous asthma etc. Learn to love your bacteria - to paraphrase Bill Bryson, instead of thinking of them as a small part of us, think of us as a rather large part of them

  5. #5

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    Quote Originally Posted by trebizond View Post
    In all seriousness though, and only minutely off-topic, I wouldn't bother trying to kill any and all bacteria in your immediate vicinity.
    Seeing as I work in a health clinic, it behooves me to disinfect my equipment before seeing another patient. Granted, transferring swine flu from patient to patient will certainly bring me more business. But, ethically, I would feel not the best practice.

    Plus, I have been exposed to swine flu 20+ times a day the last few weeks, and have not contracted it. Having had the regular flu before, I know that I do not wish to have it again.
    "Embrace those things which give you pleasure, after all, there is so much mediocrity to endure elsewhere." -- Inselaffe

  6. #6

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    Quote Originally Posted by RHM View Post
    are the surfaces wood, metal, glass?
    Yes, yes, and yes. Also plastics. I have used alcohol rubs in the past, but they dry my hands out severely, as I have to wash my hands many times a day. Clorox wipes are expensive, and they require 5 minutes of exposure before they can effectively kill viruses.
    "Embrace those things which give you pleasure, after all, there is so much mediocrity to endure elsewhere." -- Inselaffe

  7. #7

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    Quote Originally Posted by trebizond View Post
    Plus you get some time off work, which no-one can argue about (largely because they don't want to be infected), and you get to lie on your sofa.
    As someone who is self-employed, I'm working even when I'm "off." So, there is no real "time off work" for me. Even when sick.
    "Embrace those things which give you pleasure, after all, there is so much mediocrity to endure elsewhere." -- Inselaffe

  8. #8

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    There is a brand in the stores called "method" that is nicer smelling and is supposedly more natural cleaners I think. Don't know much about their bacteria fighting statistics but they smell good and seem to do a good job. I have used some of their products in the home but not in a clinical setting. Maybe just try using a mask and latex/rubber gloves when wiping stuff down to eliminate contact with the cleaner.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    Check the disinfectant wipes in your local store, all of ours have these at the front door now and they are really not that unpleasant. You can also try wiping things down with a hand sanitizer that has a fragrance you can stand or find a different Lysol scent.

    Lavender is a natural disinfectant and so is geranium or you can look in your health food store for something that contains grapefruit seed extract which is very effective. The natural cleaners on our grocery store shelves don't say disinfectant, so they may not kill germs unless you see one that contains an essence or ingredient known for that.

  10. #10
    kumquat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    I have a can of Lysol in 'Crisp Linen' scent it has almost no smell. Not bad at all.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    We really just need to clean things- not disinfect. Disinfecting is for equipment used on our bodies (salon equipment, hospital equipment etc) although a clinic may require extra vigilance with regards to cleaning.

    I use vinegar to clean almost everything in my house. Yes, it smells like a chip wagon while it dries, but it dissipates quickly. I have straight vinegar in a spray bottle and use it with recycled paper towels on all surfaces. I spray the paper towel and wipe down my computer, cell phone, homes phones, door knobs etc on a regular basis. Too often according my kids

    I used to own an enviro friendly home cleaning company and vinegar was a mainstay of our cleaning supplies. It leaves zero streaks. It may not smell much better than Lysol, but at least it does not contain phalates or sickening artificial fragrance. Febreeze and the like smell like chemical cocktails- blech. In my past business of home cleaning and my present business of real estate, I go into homes on an almost daily basis. I can usually spot the Lysol, Febreeze (and the like) and Glade spritzed homes before I open the front door. Yuck. That stuff cannot be good for you.

    As for my hands, I touch many doorknobs etc throughout the day. I keep unscented, "sensitive skin" baby wipes in my car and simply "wash" my hands after showing a home or shaking hands at open houses. They do not dry out skin like Purel or alcohol based sanitizers, and do a great job of cleaning my hands. And if my hands do get dry, I always have hand cream in my purse. Keeping your hands moisturized is a good idea- helps to prevent cracks in the skin and hangnails etc that could leave you open to infection getting in the wound.

    From www.care2.com:

    "The vim of vinegar is that it kills bacteria, mold and germs.

    Heinz company spokesperson Michael Mullen references numerous studies to show that a straight 5 percent solution of vinegar—thekind you can buy in the supermarket—kills 99 percent of bacteria, 82 percent of mold, and 80 percent of germs (viruses). He noted that Heinz can’t claim on their packaging that vinegar is a disinfectant since the company has not registered it as a pesticide with the Environmental Protection Agency. However, it seems to be common knowledge in the industry that vinegar is powerfully antibacterial. Even the CBS news show “48 Hours” had a special years ago with Heloise reporting on tests from The Good Housekeeping Institute that showed this.

    Just like antibiotics, common disinfectants found in sponges and household sprays may contribute to drug resistant bacteria, according to researchers of drug resistance at Tufts New England Medical Center. Furthermore, research at the Government Accounting Office shows that many commercial disinfectants are ineffective to begin with, just like antibiotics."
    Last edited by Jane Daly; 9th November 2009 at 03:16 PM.
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  12. #12

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    It could be my imagination but the new Pledge multi surface sprays seem to have a vinegar undertone to me, but are quite unoffensive and mild smelling otherwise, two fragrances- Lavender Vanilla and Rainshower I think- still not sure how anti viral -anti bacterial they might be.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    CHEMICAL FREE ALTERNATIVE for killing germs: All you need is three percent hydrogen peroxide, the type you buy at the drug store, vinegar (white or apple cider) and two clean sprayer bottles. Fill each sprayer separately, one with peroxide and the other with vinegar (don't mix them together in one bottle -

    Spritz the item you want to disinfect, first with hydrogen peroxide and then with vinegar, then rinse off under running water.

    University tests show that this technique killed more potentially lethal organisms, including Salmonella, Shigella, and even E. coli, than chlorine bleach or any commercially available kitchen cleaner."

  14. #14

    Default Re: Desiring a more pleasant alternative to Lysol

    This may be a bit late for you, but maybe for future health scares. I live in the US and during the flu season I pay a visit to Costco and buy a ton of rubbing alcohol, found often next to the latex gloves. I often add a few drops of lavender or rosewater to scent it and spray away. I'm not sure where you work, but for me, our keyboards are made with a silicon layer and at the end of the day we stick anything dishwasher safe into the dishwasher and wash away on hot. As for everything else, a quick spritz with our scented alcohol and a wipe with a clean rag cleans our paranoia away.
    Someone mentioned above about having dry hands because of the alcohol. The best way to deal with this is to have some of those latex gloves nearby and when you're cleaning, wear them. To save on costs, I put them aside and reuse them the next time I have a cleaning session, dispose the gloves once a week or take them to sink and wash them down with some good old dishwashing detergent.
    Last edited by puerjohn; 21st June 2010 at 01:06 AM.

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