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  1. #1

    Default The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    I had a sample of Amouage Silver Crystal and finished it quite fast. It was my favorite Amouage by far so one of my first projects was to try and approach it with my oils.

    This is the formula I ended with after one modification stage:

    Frankincense 14
    Oud 8
    Sandalwood 8
    Cedar 5
    Safron 5
    Musk 5

    Patchouli 2
    Jasmine 8
    Clovebud 4
    Cardemom 3

    Rose 12
    Ylang-Ylang 8
    Rosewood 3

    For several weeks, it smelled like Anise until this week, after shaking everyday, it opened up and many notes surfaced. I'm not neutral and I definitely can't remember how was the Amouage but I sure love this formula.

    So my lesson is that perfume making can only be developed slowly, allowing the ingredients marry. Actually, a harsh young scent may just be a good sign like classic Bordeaux wines - the brute and aggressive young wines are the ones that mature into great wines.

  2. #2

    Default Re: The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    I've had similar experiences. Scents that seemed very "rough" at first ended up being excellent and smooth after aging for a while. But I'm not sure how you got anise out of that mix!
    Blog: www.perfumenw.blogspot.com
    Website: Olympic Orchids Artisan Perfumes http://orchidscents.com.

  3. #3

    Default Re: The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    I'm not sure but I think the Ylang-Ylang, rose and Frankincense in this ratio may have created an accord that is similar to anise.
    There's still an anise in this formula but at least now, it's much more complex and to my liking.

  4. #4

    Default Re: The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    I start by making dilutions of all of my component oils. I let them age a couple of weeks. I then use them in blends, and the smell changes very little over time. You can tell immediately what you've got. Working directly with oils frustrated me terribly.

  5. #5

    Default Re: The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    I use dilutions too (all at 20%) and still find it takes about 3-5 days, sometimes a week or slightly more, for a blend to really settle down into something indicative of the final product. It can be frustrating.. this sure requires patience!
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  6. #6

    Default Re: The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    I too work at dilution, mine at 10% and sometimes 5% in FC oil. I am trying to mix a beautiful perfume for a cousins 50th birthday present. I mixed what I thought was a beautiful blend two days ago, and already it has changed to something else. A pleasant perfume, but not as I intended. I have now mixed another with different proportions to see if it will stay as I wish it to be. One day later it smells right but is still obviously unblended and crude.

    It seems to me to be very, very difficult to get smell to behave as you think it should do. It seems to take three plus days for the molecules to make friends and re-blend themselves. I assume they are making and breaking molecule rings and therefore making something that they were not before (can anyone enlighten that simplistic thought?).

    The time certainly seems to take the jags out of a new blend, but I have noticed that it also gives the 'hint' drops a chance sometimes to be unexpectedly powerful. Things like nutmeg and cardomon can quite take over, even in small quantities. This is the part I am perpetually falling down on.

    I also noticed this:- if I am in the process of inventing a blend and leave it for a day or two to develop, then add a couple of nuances, then leave it again, then decide perhaps I am happy with it.

    I then mix the proper perfume together with all the same drops, but, oh dear, it doesn't smell the same as the first trial. Mixing all the molecules at the same time didn't produce the same result. The original mix obviously (to me) bound the molecules one way in the first stage, and prevented the next bit bonding in the same way as when all put together at the same time.

    Does this ramble make sense? Do the molecules behave like this? Is that why time makes the difference? Am I talking rubbish.

  7. #7

    Default Re: The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    Hi Mumsy, little bit late after almost two years, but who knows who i can help with this (partial) answer: http://www.stephen-herman.com/Blackwell.pdf

  8. #8

    Default Re: The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    VERY interesting article jsparla, thanks for sharing !

    Regards

  9. #9
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    Default Re: The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    That really was an interesting chapter.


  10. #10

    Default Re: The effect of time on formula - my last lesson

    Quote Originally Posted by jsparla View Post
    Hi Mumsy, little bit late after almost two years, but who knows who i can help with this (partial) answer: http://www.stephen-herman.com/Blackwell.pdf
    Congratulations on what must surely be the best first post Iíve seen by anyone on this forum!

    When I saw this thread pop up and read the OP (without noticing how old it was) I was mentally preparing an answer to discuss the formation of Shiffís Bases, the widespread presence of Eugenol in natural oils and so forth . . . then I found this and realised nothing I was in danger of writing would cover the ground nearly so well.

    Splendid stuff - thanks for sharing.
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

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