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  1. #1

    Default What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    I own bottles of Grey Flannel and Bowling Green, and when I first spray them on, I always have the same initial reaction: What the heck were perfumers of this era thinking (or trying to do). These two creations, while I like them, are almost nuclear in strength. Grey Flannel smells particularly nice when smelled at a distance. I actually apply it to my abdomen, and by the time it wafts all the way up my shirt, and out the collar it smells nice. Applied any closer to my nose, and it's just too much. I can't even think about applying these two fragrances to exposed skin.

    I have a similar reaction to Nasomatto Duro. Why make something this strong.

    I love fragrance, but wow.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Ahh, those were the good old days......
    Please feel free to check out my Swap Thread - Patou pour Homme, L'Instant de Guerlain PH Extreme, Dior Homme Intense, Pure Malt, Pure Coffee and many more! Click Here For My Swap Thread

  3. #3

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by petruccijc View Post
    Ahh, those were the good old days......
    I think it's a matter of perspective. To us who grew up in those days these fragrances smell normal, not unusually strong. It's the recent fragrances that smell unusually weak in comparison.

  4. #4

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by noggs View Post
    I think it's a matter of perspective. To us who grew up in those days these fragrances smell normal, not unusually strong. It's the recent fragrances that smell unusually weak in comparison.
    Yes, I grew up in that era and wore Paco Rabanne and Azzaro in the mid 1980's. These Beene frags seem to be at the extreme even for this era though. I do particularly like GF when worn carefully.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by JonB View Post
    Grey Flannel smells particularly nice when smelled at a distance.
    Absolutely. But many fragrances are meant to be smelled from a distance though extraits tend to wear closer to the skin for those more intimate encounters.

  6. #6
    AromiErotici
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    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Frags from this era were "normal". Everything ( almost) was constructed in such a way as to compete with others of its ilk. Because of this, I have somewhat of a problem with modern releases being anemic.

    It comes down to what you grow up with and become accustomed to. I associate with quite a few guys in their 20's who play softball for me. Some of them wear scent and they gravitate ( naturally) to what is currently being offered. My frags are too much for most of them due to construction and strength.

    In the end...it's all good. It is, after all, wearing what pleases YOU....and with any luck, those around you will like it too.

  7. #7

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Ashamedly enough, Grey Flannel is perhaps the only stronger/powerhouse that I have in my collection... takes me back to my own youth and so many men around me wearing it that I looked up to. Moderation is the key, spray to the abdomen and you're golden.

    Heck, I'm gonna wear it today. Thanks for the idea!

  8. #8

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    I think Geoffrey Beene was thinking "I need to make something that Paco will think is a masterpiece."

    Well, he succeeded!
    ***For sale:

    Iris Pallida 50ml

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  9. #9

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Grey Flannel is way too shrill, nasty, and powerful.
    But Bowling Green isn't too strong at all imo.

  10. #10

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by petruccijc View Post
    Ahh, those were the good old days......
    +1.

  11. #11

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Grey Flannel is a masterpiece. And will continue to be relevant for years to come, as long as it is applied in accordance (in today's anemic frag world, very lightly indeed). This is one frag I can honestly say I cannot do without. And though there are many others from that era that just make me feel alive (for example Azzaro Pour Homme), there is something about Grey Flannel that gets my juices flowing. It is, the smell of life

    Keep your bottle of Grey Flannel. Try it once every 6 monthos or so, see what happens.
    Keep Smelling Good
    ANDREW

  12. #12
    vita odorifera
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    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    GB certainly wasn't thinking that he may offend with his frags. We certainly welcomed the smell and power of the frags of the glory days. I still do.
    ointments and perfume delight the heart....

    #BBOG!

  13. #13

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by JonB View Post
    I own bottles of Grey Flannel and Bowling Green, and when I first spray them on, I always have the same initial reaction: What the heck were perfumers of this era thinking (or trying to do).
    Opening with more of a "punch" seems to be a good way to ensure that you don't apply it liberally like you would a weaker scent, or a more common EdC or aftershave.

  14. #14

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    These fragrances come from a time when the Houses were not afraid to make a real fragrance.....One that would last more than 2 hours.....When I spray some of the new scents on a blotter card I have a difficult time smelling anything at all.....My smeller works fine so I know there's nothing wrong with me.....Gary

  15. #15

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by JonB View Post
    I own bottles of Grey Flannel and Bowling Green, and when I first spray them on, I always have the same initial reaction: What the heck were perfumers of this era thinking (or trying to do). These two creations, while I like them, are almost nuclear in strength. Grey Flannel smells particularly nice when smelled at a distance. I actually apply it to my abdomen, and by the time it wafts all the way up my shirt, and out the collar it smells nice. Applied any closer to my nose, and it's just too much. I can't even think about applying these two fragrances to exposed skin.



    I have a similar reaction to Nasomatto Duro. Why make something this strong.

    I love fragrance, but wow.
    They make them for me.

  16. #16

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    On me Grey Flannel actually seems like a powerhouse with a very avant-garde, smooth but still masculine powdery floral twist

    Frankly speaking, after it settles for about 30-45 minutes on my skin, Grey Flannel is one of the most subtle yet distinctive and suave concoctions I can think of, but than again I was always very keen on finding something like this frag

  17. #17

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by perfaddict View Post
    GB certainly wasn't thinking that he may offend with his frags. We certainly welcomed the smell and power of the frags of the glory days. I still do.
    Indeed!
    For those about to stink, I salute you!

  18. #18

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by noggs View Post
    I think it's a matter of perspective. To us who grew up in those days these fragrances smell normal, not unusually strong. It's the recent fragrances that smell unusually weak in comparison.
    This is quite true.

  19. #19

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Grey Flannel is quite a bit older than I am, but I can certainly appreciate the scent. It's a powerhouse that is still very wearable in the present day. Modern mainstream fragrances are just too vapid.
    Looking for: Creed caps

  20. #20

    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    Quote Originally Posted by petruccijc View Post
    Ahh, those were the good old days......
    I was thinking of the good old 1830s, LOL! A man would enter a room "smelling of musk and insolence."
    "No sweet perfume ever tortured me more than this." Desert Rose by Sting and Cheb Mami, Album 1999.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: What was Geoffrey Beene thinking

    I didn't think Bowling Green was all that powerful. Definitely luminous, but not a monster by any means.
    Grey Flannel is just a classic scent, and most classic scents are loaded with body and personality. But what were they thinking when they made it?
    Look at the concept: dessicated citrus, on top of violet/violet leaf, all mated to oakmoss.
    Together, they form the ultimate masculine violet fragrance. But it's impossible to do this without using some high-octane ingredients! The moss on the base is what grabs me, and the violets get very flowery with extended wear.

    Andre Fromentin, a nose which, at the time, was not in any way bowing to the fruity, boring, aquatic future, simply wanted to make a masterpiece, and I think he succeeded.



    ..

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