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  1. #1

    Default Rectified Cade or Birch

    Does anyone have a favorite source for rectified cade or birch tar? My previous suppliers are a little shaky on rectification and the whole bad hydrocarbon thing, so I'm looking elsewhere. I'm pretty sure it has to involve vacuum distillation as a second stage process.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Rectified Cade or Birch

    Anyone?

  3. #3

    Default Re: Rectified Cade or Birch

    Sorry. Not actually sure what you mean..... What's rectification and bad hydrocarbon thing?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Rectified Cade or Birch

    My understanding--and I could be wrong--is that the IFRA banned the use of Cade oil, then revised it so that "rectified" Cade and/or rectified birch tar could be used. Apparently one of the chemical compounds in the crude oil is considered a carcinogen, so you can't use Cade or Birch tar unless the the distilled oil has the polynuclear hydrocarbon removed, much in the same way that bergamot is often sold as "bergaptene free." Bergaptenes are apparently the chemical that can causes photo sensitivity, so you can buy it with the naughty chemical removed and use more of it without restriction.

    So anyway, to use Cade for anyone other than yourself you have to get the rectified kind (carcinogen removed) and I have been having a hard time finding a supplier who even knows what that is. And I was wondering if anyone else had had any luck.

    (Sorry for rambling.)

  5. #5

    Default Re: Rectified Cade or Birch

    I was unaware, and was using my birch tar as I bought it with no idea whether it was rectified or not. I might add that it is so incredibly strong that to put any more than a micro trace in would ruin the perfume anyway, so I would imagine it isn't that much of a problem in the long run. With or without carcinogens.

    EO manufacturers have to provide an information sheet on their product for safety reasons. Have a look on the good scents guide, there are lists of all the manufacturers on there.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Rectified Cade or Birch

    This may help clarify: http://www.ifraorg.org/en-us/Standards_Specification

    From Arctander: "The cade oil, used in perfumery is usually a rectified oil, obtained by rectification (steam distillation or vacuum distillation) of the crude juniper tar oil."

    With cade, products are usually sold as either cade oil or cade crude. Birch tar is murkier, since the crude is sometimes called "birch tar oil". However, when either is labeled "essential oil" or is specified as steam distilled, that would imply that it's ok to use in fragrance. However, that is not to say that the labeling is always accurate!

    I can't speak from experience with birch tar (mine is from New Directions and was sold as a steam-distilled essential oil) but I have samples of cade oil and cade crude and there's definitely a difference in appearance which I would also assume applies to birch tar. The crude is much thicker and opaque when dissolved at 10%, the oil has a relatively thin consistency. Unfortunately, the odor is relatively thin too, compared to the intense smokiness of the crude tar.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Rectified Cade or Birch

    I have, after a long search for a European supplier, obtained my rectified Cade and Birch Tar from White Lotus - the crude versions I have came from Hermitage and Bristol Botanicals respectively. The rectified versions certainly do show some differences - at some point I'll write up a scent comparison on the relevant single-note thread - meanwhile I would say they are certainly still worth having and using.

    I use the crude versions for non-skin-contact applications such as reed diffusers and the rectified in everything else. You only ever need tiny amounts so I can't make the minimum orders for any of the big suppliers. The main downside (besides the hassle and expense of import) of dealing with White Lotus is that they don't supply any of the msds data you'd be able to get from a European supplier.
    Chris Bartlett
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