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  1. #1

    Default beginner making perfumes as Xmas presents

    Hi

    I've read as much as I could find already, but still having difficulty with proportions and not overwhelming my small experimental mixtures with one strong scent. I've read the sticky on basic method, and I've been trying approximately that except I have tried surgical spirit and I agree it is horrible! I'll go to the off licence and try to find a small quantity of pure grain alcohol or if that's too expensive waitrose triple distilled vodka.

    I'm trying to make two male scents and two female scents, to start with.

    I particularly like:

    oakmoss
    vetiver
    white birch

    All of these are strong, but white birch is SO strong it overwhelms the others. I have 1ml pipettes so I can try again with 0.1ml per 30ml, but it's hard to edge it up a little without overdoing it!

    My girlfriend likes cinnamon, but again it's one that overwhelms all the others if I'm not very careful with the micro-pipette. I've got quite a nice mixture overwhelmed with cinnamon now so I don't need another one!

    Bog myrtle - is surprisingly nice in mixtures, and brings back happy memories of squelching around in bogs in the New Forest as a kid, it has a very warm spicy slightly peppery smell, mood-wise I'd compare it to a pillow fight in bed with my girlfriend on a lazy saturday morning when it's raining outside.

    Ginger - I find surprisingly nice on my girlfriend, so far I've tried it combined in a tiny proportion with mostly ylang ylang and patchouli and a bit of tangerine.

    I like rose based scents on women, but genuine rose damascena absolute I've decided is out of my budget. I've got a fairly decent synthetic fragrance oil that doesn't smell like old ladies' pot pourri, and I'm planning to blend it with other deeper more complex genuine oils to make up for its rather overly simple synthetic chemical profile.

    I'm thinking of making basically:

    a 'neo-classical chypre' as a masculine one
    an 'indien' based on sandalwood and vetiver and patchouli

    a rose based one with labdanum
    a rose, ylang ylang, complex 'oriental' one

    I won't waffle on anymore, but any suggestions (I've read the sticky on basic method) about combinations and proportions and how to avoid overwhelming a blend with one element would be welcome!

    Thanks
    Kester

  2. #2

    Default Re: beginner making perfumes as Xmas presents

    Hi Kester,

    I'm a beginner too and I probably don't have as much experience as a lot of the others on the DIY forum, but I might be able to help a little bit.

    I haven't used cinnamon yet, but I've heard that it's a tricky note to use because of its association with potpourri. I read that a little bit can be blended with rose though.

    On some websites that sell raw materials (like Perfumer's Apprentice) they list the maximum amount you can use of an ingredient in the concentrate. I've been using these as guidelines for how much I should add of an ingredient and it's been very useful so far.

    Also, you might already know this, but your perfumes are going to need time to settle before Christmas if you want to give them away as presents. I wanted to make some perfumes for my cousin/friends and I'm afraid that if I don't hurry up and start working on them they won't be ready in time...

    I hope this helps.

  3. #3

    Default Re: beginner making perfumes as Xmas presents

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauren O View Post
    I haven't used cinnamon yet, but I've heard that it's a tricky note to use because of its association with potpourri. I read that a little bit can be blended with rose though.
    I don't think I'm going to bother trying to mix cinnamon into a DIY fragrance again -there are loads of generic commercial ones based on cinnamon (CK Obsession, e.g.), I'd rather do something different.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauren O View Post
    On some websites that sell raw materials (like Perfumer's Apprentice) they list the maximum amount you can use of an ingredient in the concentrate. I've been using these as guidelines for how much I should add of an ingredient and it's been very useful so far.
    I had a really thorough look thru Perfumer's Apprentice website and could not find the page you mention, please could you provide a link?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauren O View Post
    Also, you might already know this, but your perfumes are going to need time to settle before Christmas if you want to give them away as presents. I wanted to make some perfumes for my cousin/friends and I'm afraid that if I don't hurry up and start working on them they won't be ready in time...
    Yep, I know I've got to hurry up, but I think realistically chances are they're likely to not get used very much after Xmas day.. so I'm giving very small bottles and see how they go down, the mixtures will have at least 48hrs to sit, more like six weeks probably.

    Thanks! Please if you could show me a link to the page you were talking about that would be tres helpful!

  4. #4

    Default Re: beginner making perfumes as Xmas presents

    It's not really one particular page--it's any of the pages where you can buy the ingredients. Here's a link to the page for aroma molecules A-E.

    http://shop.perfumersapprentice.com/...cules-a-e.aspx

    See how it says "Can use up to 5% of total concentrate" under the first one, acetanisole? It's listed there for almost all of the ingredients they sell at Perfumer's Apprentice, under the name/description.

    P.S. You have a point about the settling thing! Hopefully that will buy me some time, too. And I guess we can always just explain to friends/family that the perfumes are going to get better after a couple weeks.

  5. #5

    Default Re: beginner making perfumes as Xmas presents

    You can also look on TheGoodScentsCompany website for this info

  6. #6

    Default Re: beginner making perfumes as Xmas presents

    heres what i do. i have a bottle of lavender that i use as a refference. sniff the oil you want to use compared to the lavender oil. is it a stronger smell? if so them you need to dilute it in a 10% solution in a carrier oil or, perfumers alcohol. this would bring your drops to 10% of thier fragrance power. if it doesnt smell as strong as the lav., then your prob ok to add a full drop.
    "Strive for perfection in everything, take the best that exists and make it better, if it doesn't exist create it, accept nothing nearly right or good enough." Sir Henry Royce

  7. #7

    Default Re: beginner making perfumes as Xmas presents

    My pennysworth would be to to use oils as a base if you want anything ready in time for Christmas. They will stop ingredients being too overpowerful and if you mix them at a 10% dilution, then you will have a lovely perfume oil that is ready to wear. I use fractionated coconut, and jojoba is an easy one to get hold of. Then your recipient can use them in the bath too.

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