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  1. #1

    Default Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    I've noticed a pattern lately as I've continued to sample and appreciate classic scents.

    There seems to be a schism, somewhere around the late 1940's/1950's where my appreciation for classics changes a bit.

    I own and regularly wear many scents from the 50's, 60's, 70's, etc. I appreciate them on both the cerebral level and the utilitarian level. Chanel PM, Givenchy Gentleman, Aramis, Azzaro, Equipage, etc. get a lot of wear.

    Scents from before that date (1800s - early/mid 1900s, i.e. many of the original Guerlains and Carons) are difficult for me to relate to. It's like they're so outside my frame of reference that I can't (how to put this?) "let loose" around them...have a personal relationship And, most importantly, actually use the scent as my SotD often.

    There are exceptions. I wear Caron PuH and Shalimar rather often. But as a whole, my appreciation for scents of this age tends to veer toward artistic merit, historical importance, and classical beauty that I can only admire from a distance, like a piece in a museum.

    Not that I really mind this. I enjoy sniffing these scents at night on my wrist. I was just sort of pondering the issue.

    Just thought I'd share. Has anyone else experienced this?
    Last edited by LiveJazz; 21st January 2011 at 06:41 PM.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."

  2. #2

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Interesting point. Perhaps it's just a matter of habit. I've never worn perfumes until a few years ago, and my father wasn't big on fragrances either, so I didn't have much acquaintance and familiarity with the more recent perfumes. So when I started smelling, it was pretty much empty territory, old or new. The only thing to overcome was the initial reaction to richer and stronger perfumes, but once that's gone, no difference. In general, I feel that the surviving pre-50s stuff tends to be richer and sometimes with more notes we think dirty now (like civet). Which, to me, is a plus.

    By the way, are you thinking about masculines, or in general? Not having an extensive collection, I cannot think of many masculine perfumes from before the 50s still in existence. What would be examples? In addition to Caron puh, I can think of Knize Ten, Jicky, and that's pretty much it. Mitsouko and Vol de Nuit could qualify. And all of these smell great for me.

    cacio

  3. #3

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    In my case, no boundaries at all, I would even consider wearing the initial EdC formulation from 1709 (honestly!), almost no frag smells too classic to my nose

  4. #4

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Era as a factor in and of itself is never a consideration for me, in fragrances or anything else. Those who only like music, movies, books, etc from their own generation always baffle me. If it's good, it's good, no matter the year of origin. And I felt the same way when I was 22. That said, with fragrances the sample population is obviously smaller with male-oriented scents from the early 20th Century so naturally there are more post-50s fragrances in my collection than pre-50s. Knize Ten and Mitsouko (unisex) are as good as anything (just about) created in the last 100 years.

  5. #5
    hednic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    No age boundaries for me as far as fragrances are concerned.

  6. #6
    vita odorifera
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    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post
    In my case, no boundaries at all....almost no frag smells too classic to my nose
    My thoughts as well.
    ointments and perfume delight the heart....

    #BBOG!

  7. #7

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    eh.
    yeah good stuff is always good, but usually with respect to their own era.
    yes, I can still watch sergio leone westerns and like them normally.
    but kurosawa's seven samurai? I can't immerse myself in it, and my interest goes as far as academic interest.
    exceptions are rare.

    everyone is shaped by their environment, it's inevitable.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post
    In my case, no boundaries at all, I would even consider wearing the initial EdC formulation from 1709 (honestly!), almost no frag smells too classic to my nose
    +2.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Quote Originally Posted by hednic View Post
    No age boundaries for me as far as fragrances are concerned.
    Me, neither. Any frag, any time, any place!

  10. #10

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    LJ, this is a really good observation. I'm going to think about whether there's an implicit demarcation line or boundary in how I react to scents. Of course I'll wear anything from any time, but the way I relate to it or experience my own comfort in relation to it, and if those impressions can be put on different sides of a boundary line I've never known was there before, is something I'll think about before answering.
    That girl, that bottle, that mattress and me.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Quote Originally Posted by Swanky View Post
    Era as a factor in and of itself is never a consideration for me, in fragrances or anything else. Those who only like music, movies, books, etc from their own generation always baffle me. If it's good, it's good, no matter the year of origin. And I felt the same way when I was 22. That said, with fragrances the sample population is obviously smaller with male-oriented scents from the early 20th Century so naturally there are more post-50s fragrances in my collection than pre-50s. Knize Ten and Mitsouko (unisex) are as good as anything (just about) created in the last 100 years.
    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post
    The only thing to overcome was the initial reaction to richer and stronger perfumes, but once that's gone, no difference. In general, I feel that the surviving pre-50s stuff tends to be richer and sometimes with more notes we think dirty now (like civet). Which, to me, is a plus.

    By the way, are you thinking about masculines, or in general? Not having an extensive collection, I cannot think of many masculine perfumes from before the 50s still in existence. What would be examples? In addition to Caron puh, I can think of Knize Ten, Jicky, and that's pretty much it. Mitsouko and Vol de Nuit could qualify. And all of these smell great for me.
    The same thing occured to me - that my hesitance might be the result of notes that aren't smelled anymore, or some unexplored prejudice against old things. But I really don't think that's it. These scents aren't shocking or unattractive to me. I really like them, for the most part.

    I know it's just a mental thing: I feel like these scents are beautiful but somehow fragile, to be analysed and appreciated thoroughly, but handled with care, and not to be worn while dilly-dallying about.

    Also, this applies to all scents, masculine and feminine, from this era - and there are plenty.



    On the other hand, I was sampling L'Heure Bleue (gorgeous!!) when I started this train of thought, and that scent is well known to cause melancholic reveries.

    So maybe that's it.
    Last edited by LiveJazz; 21st January 2011 at 06:43 PM.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    I try all of them - some I like, some I don't. It all depends on the fragrance.
    Please feel free to check out my Swap Thread - Patou pour Homme, L'Instant de Guerlain PH Extreme, Dior Homme Intense, Pure Malt, Pure Coffee and many more! Click Here For My Swap Thread

  13. #13

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Quote Originally Posted by LiveJazz View Post
    I know it's just a mental thing: I feel like these scents are beautiful but somehow fragile, to be analysed and appreciated thoroughly, but handled with care, and not to be worn while dilly-dallying about.
    Definitely agree. Shakespeare was a populist and popular writer. His works are classics now, and are not understood as how they were back then. Same thing with classic and classical music. Same even with old photographs of times when we were really happy and all that. They all come with a bit of melancholy and bitterness added, and are not what they were anymore.

    Imo that is.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Quote Originally Posted by sarıpatates View Post
    Definitely agree. Shakespeare was a populist and popular writer. His works are classics now, and are not understood as how they were back then. Same thing with classic and classical music. Same even with old photographs of times when we were really happy and all that. They all come with a bit of melancholy and bitterness added, and are not what they were anymore.
    I like that. Could be a driver.

    Do you feel that way? Are scents included?
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."

  15. #15

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Quote Originally Posted by LiveJazz View Post
    On the other hand, I was sampling L'Heure Bleue (gorgeous!!) when I started this train of thought, and that scent is well known to cause melancholic reveries.
    A spray of Bandit (1944) should cure this.

    cacio

  16. #16

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    No intellectual/psychological boundary for me. I have noticed that I don't gravitate toward any fragrance that predates the 70's onward (except perhaps Fracas on a woman and 4711 for sentimental reasons). Most of what I like were launched from the 90's onward.

    I'm open to experiencing older frags but I just haven't found any. If anything, I wonder "What the heck were they thinking back then?"

  17. #17

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sensual View Post
    No intellectual/psychological boundary for me. I have noticed that I don't gravitate toward any fragrance that predates the 70's onward (except perhaps Fracas on a woman and 4711 for sentimental reasons). Most of what I like were launched from the 90's onward.

    I'm open to experiencing older frags but I just haven't found any. If anything, I wonder "What the heck were they thinking back then?"
    Perhaps I am misunderstanding your post, but it sounds like that would be the boundary for you. I'm not talking about a conscious avoidance of older scents....just a change in perception, a small remoteness, or a different kind of appreciation.




    [edit: I'm sorry to all if I've failed to convey my meaning adequately...it's kind of hard for me to put my finger on it.]
    Last edited by LiveJazz; 22nd January 2011 at 04:55 PM.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."

  18. #18

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    No real boundary no. If I like it, I wear it. One of the advantages of being in the "mature" category is that I can wear scents that some might deem too "old."

    Wasn't the case for me a few years back. I ran from some of the older Creeds which are now discontinued back in the 90s.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    I go on gut feeling - for instance, something like Chanel Pour Monsieur (1955?) is something I like and feels classic, yet something quite a bit younger say Pierre Cardin for men (70's) to me feels dated and reminds me of a certain period (70's obviously). Same way I might assocate something like Drakkar with a distinct 80's vibe, while other powerhouses from that period, I feel are more wearable, and while maybe representative of the style then, don't make me feel like I just stepped out of a time machine

  20. #20

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    I wear Jicky and Mouchoir de Monsieur a lot, so I guess no for me.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Classic scents: Do you have a boundary?

    As long as I like it it's all good. Most of what I have is not older than the 60's though. I haven't tried a lot of frags that were older, but the ones I have I didn't really like a whole lot except for Old Spice, but honestly I have only had the cheapies.

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