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  1. #1

    Default Is Longevity BS?

    I've read and watched tonnes of reviews on fragrances where people go on about 4-12+ hours of longevity.
    I've never come across a perfume that lasts more than 2-3 hours. I know people have different skin types but really? How many people actually get 4-12+ hours of longevity cause I think it's kind of BS.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    i agree to an extent. I have very dry skin and longevity is a big factor for me. Fragrances that give me 10+ hours

    andy tauer - lair du desert maurocain
    amouage - epic man, silver man, opus 3, jubilation vvx
    dior - fahrenheit
    montale - all that i have tried so far
    guerlain - spiriteuese double vanille
    frederic malle - musc ravageur
    jpg - le male
    thierry mugler - all a-men's


    fragrances that last less than 3 hours:


    aqua di parma - cipresso di toscana
    hermes - hermesscence line
    creed - virgin island water lasts literally 20 minutes, literally
    mazzolari - marina

  3. #3

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    I have problem with that too but I don't get 2-3 hours. For example Le male lasts 10 hours on me. It's not bad but people get more than that. Or they say a*men last 12-24 hours but I get around 10. If you have never had more then 2-3 hours of longevity, then you may have some problem with your body chemistry. I mean it's just an opinion of mine. You might be fine with the chemistry.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by john916 View Post
    i agree to an extent. I have very dry skin and longevity is a big factor for me. Fragrances that give me 10+ hours
    I live in London and I usually smell quite a few scents on the way to work in the morning. However I rarely ever smell village from anyone on my way back. I use the tube (subway).

  5. #5

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by esato-1 View Post
    I have problem with that too but I don't get 2-3 hours. For example Le male lasts 10 hours on me.
    Can I ask how you know a fragrance lasts 10 hours on you? I stop smelling any scent I've applied after an hour and a half unless I hold my nose close and sniff really hard.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by Litefooted View Post
    Can I ask how you know a fragrance lasts 10 hours on you? I stop smelling any scent I've applied after an hour and a half unless I hold my nose close and sniff really hard.
    Le male projects very well on me for 5-6 hours. So I don't really have to hold my nose close to sniff. Afeter 5 hours it stars to calm down but I can still smell it when I want to. Le male is amazsing about that. I think you can get at least 6-8 hours with that. Did you try le male?

  7. #7

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    I certainly can get far more than 2-3 hours of longevity with some fragrances I own; on the other hand, I get less than 2 hours with a few of the citrus-based ones. I think it's an important issue and appreciate hearing other Basenoters' experiences with various frags...it's a very legitimate concern when one considers paying several hundred dollars/pounds/euros for a fragrance.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    No, it's not BS at all. Some fragrances simply last longer and/or project more than others. There are lots of factors, both actual and perceived, that factor into how long a scent is perceptible on a person.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    No by the time I really got into fragrances Le Male was extremely common and it smells just okay to me.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by cologne connoisseur View Post
    I think it's an important issue and appreciate hearing other Basenoters' experiences with various frags...it's a very legitimate concern when one considers paying several hundred dollars/pounds/euros for a fragrance.
    Same

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Longevity IS BS - but not in the way the OP means. To answer the OPs concerns, I would suggest that you may be experiencing some olfactory fatigue when you wear a fragrance and although you can't smell it on yourself other people would be able to smell it on you (if they're close enough). When I go on long drives I like to sample something different on each wrist, checking it's development every so often. Doing this has showed me that perfumes really do last several hours on the skin, including those perfumes I couldn't smell on myself when I was wearing them.

    What is BS is the notion that longevity is someone a benchmark of a fragrance's quality - it isn't. First of all, there are plenty of people that do not want a perfume to last all day. For example my father likes to use a citrus cologne out of the shower as part of his morning ritual but doesn't want to smell like fragrance all day at work.

    Second, if one samples vintage perfumes you realize that they do not last nearly as long as today's perfumes. This is most likely because of the ingredients they employed. Today's aromachemical laden perfumes are capable of lasting much longer on the skin because the chemicals' molecules break down more slowly. A perfume lasting a long time does not mean it's of higher quality, and it doesn't necessarily mean it's more potent - it just means it contains longer-acting aromachemicals. All-natural/organic perfumes tend to have less longevity for this reason, and this doesn't mean they are of poor quality at all.

    Finally, it's the easiest thing to reapply one's fragrance. They used to make parfums in purse-sizes for this reason, and today one can decant into an atomizer. As people once did (when vintage perfumes weren't vintage), just reapply if you want to freshen up your perfume. Plus how long does one really need a fragrance to last? If I'm going out at night for dinner and drinks then 4-5 hours is more then enough... do I really care if my fragrance is still going at 3am?

    As with any note or accord, longevity is simply one aspect of a fragrance to like/dislike. I frequently see people write things like "this is a good fragrance except it doesn't last [x hours]" or "at this price a fragrance should last [x hours]." Obviously each individual can decide what they like/dislike in a perfume, but tying a perfume's quality or value into it's longevity is a fallacy.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by nineXseven View Post
    Longevity IS BS - but not in the way the OP means. To answer the OPs concerns, I would suggest that you may be experiencing some olfactory fatigue when you wear a fragrance and although you can't smell it on yourself other people would be able to smell it on you (if they're close enough). When I go on long drives I like to sample something different on each wrist, checking it's development every so often. Doing this has showed me that perfumes really do last several hours on the skin, including those perfumes I couldn't smell on myself when I was wearing them.

    What is BS is the notion that longevity is someone a benchmark of a fragrance's quality - it isn't. First of all, there are plenty of people that do not want a perfume to last all day. For example my father likes to use a citrus cologne out of the shower as part of his morning ritual but doesn't want to smell like fragrance all day at work.

    Second, if one samples vintage perfumes you realize that they do not last nearly as long as today's perfumes. This is most likely because of the ingredients they employed. Today's aromachemical laden perfumes are capable of lasting much longer on the skin because the chemicals' molecules break down more slowly. A perfume lasting a long time does not mean it's of higher quality, and it doesn't necessarily mean it's more potent - it just means it contains longer-acting aromachemicals. All-natural/organic perfumes tend to have less longevity for this reason, and this doesn't mean they are of poor quality at all.

    Finally, it's the easiest thing to reapply one's fragrance. They used to make parfums in purse-sizes for this reason, and today one can decant into an atomizer. As people once did (when vintage perfumes weren't vintage), just reapply if you want to freshen up your perfume. Plus how long does one really need a fragrance to last? If I'm going out at night for dinner and drinks then 4-5 hours is more then enough... do I really care if my fragrance is still going at 3am?

    As with any note or accord, longevity is simply one aspect of a fragrance to like/dislike. I frequently see people write things like "this is a good fragrance except it doesn't last [x hours]" or "at this price a fragrance should last [x hours]." Obviously each individual can decide what they like/dislike in a perfume, but tying a perfume's quality or value into it's longevity is a fallacy.
    I don't think it's fatigue. I try new fragrances all the time but the smell vanishes after 3 hours. I do agree that longevity isn't a mark of quality but there are people who work long hours and would like to continuously smell pleasant. I do have an Atomizer but I'd like to re-apply less often.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    I wore Gucci Nobile to work today, and it lasted all day. About 3 hours after applying, it kept reminding me of Eau de Guerlain. Then later it went back to how it smelled when first applied. I don't know if other people could smell it, but I usually wear lightly anyway. Made me think....I should just test 1 scent per day, all day, to see what it does. But who has the patience to do that.

    Frank Los Angeles 2 lasts for freakin' ever!

    Edit to clarify: both of these last well into the 8 or 9 hour mark.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    nineXseven had a nice post - to add to it a bit, you'll find that here on Basenotes people also define longevity differently. There are some who consider a fragrance's longevity to be the amount of time that you can smell its sillage - i.e. you don't have to smell your skin directly to detect the fragrance. Others consider it to be the amount of time you can detect the fragrance when smelling right where you applied it. So, for some fragrances the sillage dies down significantly after a few hours, but you can still smell the frag if you sniff your application point. Personally, I define it as the amount of time I can smell the fragrance on my skin, so I may report longer longevity than someone who assumes the frag has worn off when you can't smell it around you anymore.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    I just completely agree with nineXseven.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by sarıpatates View Post
    I just completely agree with nineXseven.
    +1. I can only detect the strongest fragrances 4 to 5 hours on me and after that I smell little if nothing at all. For me I know it's olfactory fatigue. Just yesterday I sprayed Dior Homme Sport on my wrist. After smelling it everything I put on smelled like pepper. I sprayed the other wrist 4 hours later with DHS and couldn't detect any notes except alcohol. I think the problem was that I sprayed a fragrance twice on my neck which dulled my senses.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by sarıpatates View Post
    I just completely agree with nineXseven.
    +1. I can only detect the strongest fragrances 4 to 5 hours on me and after that I smell little if nothing at all. For me I know it's olfactory fatigue. Just yesterday I sprayed Dior Homme Sport on my wrist. After smelling it everything I put on smelled like pepper. I sprayed the other wrist 4 hours later with DHS and couldn't detect any notes except alcohol. I think the problem was that I sprayed a fragrance twice on my neck which dulled my senses.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by nineXseven View Post
    Longevity IS BS - but not in the way the OP means. To answer the OPs concerns, I would suggest that you may be experiencing some olfactory fatigue when you wear a fragrance and although you can't smell it on yourself other people would be able to smell it on you (if they're close enough). When I go on long drives I like to sample something different on each wrist, checking it's development every so often. Doing this has showed me that perfumes really do last several hours on the skin, including those perfumes I couldn't smell on myself when I was wearing them.

    What is BS is the notion that longevity is someone a benchmark of a fragrance's quality - it isn't. First of all, there are plenty of people that do not want a perfume to last all day. For example my father likes to use a citrus cologne out of the shower as part of his morning ritual but doesn't want to smell like fragrance all day at work.

    Second, if one samples vintage perfumes you realize that they do not last nearly as long as today's perfumes. This is most likely because of the ingredients they employed. Today's aromachemical laden perfumes are capable of lasting much longer on the skin because the chemicals' molecules break down more slowly. A perfume lasting a long time does not mean it's of higher quality, and it doesn't necessarily mean it's more potent - it just means it contains longer-acting aromachemicals. All-natural/organic perfumes tend to have less longevity for this reason, and this doesn't mean they are of poor quality at all.

    Finally, it's the easiest thing to reapply one's fragrance. They used to make parfums in purse-sizes for this reason, and today one can decant into an atomizer. As people once did (when vintage perfumes weren't vintage), just reapply if you want to freshen up your perfume. Plus how long does one really need a fragrance to last? If I'm going out at night for dinner and drinks then 4-5 hours is more then enough... do I really care if my fragrance is still going at 3am?

    As with any note or accord, longevity is simply one aspect of a fragrance to like/dislike. I frequently see people write things like "this is a good fragrance except it doesn't last [x hours]" or "at this price a fragrance should last [x hours]." Obviously each individual can decide what they like/dislike in a perfume, but tying a perfume's quality or value into it's longevity is a fallacy.
    Interesting comments here. I agree with you all the way to the end EXCEPT up to the last sentence. There's nothing wrong with equating the "value" of the fragrance with it's longevity, especially if thats what you think is most important or valuable about a scent. We all place different values on on things and that's why some drive Honda's and others drive Escalades. If you asked me which is more valuable, we would all agree that the world's conception of value would say the Escalade is "worth" more. But as a poor graduate student, an Escalade is of little value to me, unless I can sell it. A Honda would be much more valuable. That being said, many here like myself need to know that we've spent money on something we can enjoy for more than a few hours per spray. If one places a high value on economy, then so be it.
    Spring/Summer Rotation:

    Versace Pour Homme
    Kenzo Pour Homme (vintage)
    Dolce & Gabbana Pour Homme (vintage)
    D& G Masculine
    Christian Dior Dune
    Guerlain Homme (EDT)
    Bond No9 Riverside Drive

    If smelling good was a crime, I'd be serving a lifetime sentence....

    - OE (olfactoryexperience)

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    NineXSeven is right, it might and it might not: on the one hand, it depends on the concentration of EOs in the carrier, the EO's and the fixatives used, and, on the other hand, on one's reaction to the blend. Take JPG's le Male and Fleur du Male, they have outstanding longevity even in persons for which this is an issue - that is me. Of course, even though it is good, it might not be as good as in someone with a skin that would assure better longevity than mine. Why? Orientals are longer lasting than citric blends, add to this skin chemistry - the specific weight of molecules are related to longevity. Thus, citric eo's have less longevity than woody and spicy eos.

    Now, manufacturers are aware of this and are making efforts in order to satisfy consumer's expectations... and here is when things might go awry, for this demands the use of synthetics, not a bad thing per se, but sometimes the reason why blends might feel "tingy" to the nose, or metalic, or plainly said by many, "synthetic". So, take an Eau de Cologne in composition with the longevity of an EdT, the ones I tried did not feel good, IMHO. Or good quality classic-style EdCs that are criticised for their lack of longevity, analogous to asking a strawberry to taste like a banana.

    So, the point is you will have to search for those working for you based on the occasion. Sometimes situations call for an EdC, sometimes you will want to (and might as well can) wear an EdT, an EdPs, a parfum or an extrait, so this is up to you, your tastes and the occasion.

    The best of all? Just try before you buy.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by Litefooted View Post
    I've read and watched tonnes of reviews on fragrances where people go on about 4-12+ hours of longevity.
    I've never come across a perfume that lasts more than 2-3 hours. I know people have different skin types but really? How many people actually get 4-12+ hours of longevity cause I think it's kind of BS.
    If you thought that we meant the fragrance was still just as strong and strongly projecting after 4-12+ hours as when it was first applied, you're completely mistaken. In most cases, we're only putting on a finite amount of diluted aromachemicals, which are continually removed by evaporation, absorption, diffusion, and bacterial metabolism. That's even without considering olfactory fatigue and anosmia.

    Sure, it's faint now (to me anyway), but a quick sniff at the collar of my undershirt confirms that I put on MPG's Centaure 13 hours ago. If I'd worn Knize Ten, Knize Two, Habanita, or Quorum, I could leave the shirt in the laundry pile and still recognize the fragrance from the smell of the shirt tomorrow.

    If I wore one of even these heavy hitters every day I'd soon have a lot of trouble noticing the scent in drydown as my nose adjusted. People around me might have a much different experience. For both reasons, I find it a good practice to not wear the same thing two days in a row.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    I think 4-6 hours is fine for longevity. In all reality how many times do you need anything past that amount of time? I can go out to dinner and see a movie in that time, visit friends and family in that time, go have drinks in that time, and if your in school will be done with classes by that time. Who cares if it lasts at work because all we think about is getting off anyways.

  22. #22
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    Default Objective Evidence

    Quote Originally Posted by Litefooted View Post
    I've read and watched tonnes of reviews on fragrances where people go on about 4-12+ hours of longevity.
    I've never come across a perfume that lasts more than 2-3 hours. I know people have different skin types but really? How many people actually get 4-12+ hours of longevity cause I think it's kind of BS.
    There is no need to rely on our assertions with respect to longevity. Here is a test you can do at home.

    Get two jumpers or cardigans. Spray some scent on their inside, near the underarm area, then leave the jumpers out in the open on a bed or something.

    If you spray Joop Homme, you will still smell it there 12 days later.
    If you spray, Aramis, Lagerfeld Photo, Boss 6 or Eternity under the other underarm area, you will still smell it there four to five days later.
    More typical scents may hang around for a day or two.
    If you spray Eau Sauvage or YSL PH, it will essentially be gone in around 4 hours.

    Plainly, people's skins will kill off scents a bit quicker than when the scent is in clothes. But the long lasting ones will last longer regardless of whether they're on skin or clothes.
    And most people who apply scent do so when wearing clothes, so the scent is on both clothes and skin.

    But that is not always the case. I've worn scents like Joop Hoome and Gucci Rush to the beach, and after 7 hours of going in and out of water, they still hung around with some strength on my skin (although, admittedly most wash off pretty quickly in sea water).
    Regards,
    Renato

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by nineXseven View Post
    Plus how long does one really need a fragrance to last? If I'm going out at night for dinner and drinks then 4-5 hours is more then enough... do I really care if my fragrance is still going at 3am?
    One of the things I like about Xeryus is that I can put it on before going to work, work a full day, and it's in a quiet but surprisingly good-smelling drydown during an after-dinner tabletop RPG session with friends. Enough wafts up from under the collar that I can enjoy it, but I'm relatively sure it's not strong enough to bother others at the table. I could reapply for stronger effect, but lose some of the character ... and I just don't like artemisia *that* much.

    For a nice evening dinner, I think I'd want something shorter-lived for the daytime before, and make sure that what I use in the evening can be settled down before the food is served. Yet ... Knize Ten is so very nice to wake up to.

    One of the fun things about CdG Tar is that on a hot day it completely falls apart after a few hours. What's left is a bit more posh (almost cloyingly so) than I think was called for in the original brief. Since I enjoy the before/after incongruity, is the limited longevity a real problem?

    All in all, I'd say the important thing for longevity is that what you get lasts long enough for what you want it for, and that you still want it for as long you're stuck with it.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    The scent goes on after the projection becomes less apparent. Some seem to turn on and off on me, too. Drydown is a key part of longevity. Some just dry down better than others.
    "Strange things are afoot. I am one of them and I am up to another." -*^-'._.'-^*- - S.B.
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  25. #25
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Quote Originally Posted by A. Homme View Post
    No, it's not BS at all. Some fragrances simply last longer and/or project more than others. There are lots of factors, both actual and perceived, that factor into how long a scent is perceptible on a person.
    Absolutely agree.

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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Nice to see a good discussion about what different people value regarding longevity, which confirms my theory that people value longevity differently.

    Interesting comments here. I agree with you all the way to the end EXCEPT up to the last sentence. There's nothing wrong with equating the "value" of the fragrance with it's longevity, especially if thats what you think is most important or valuable about a scent.
    I agree that we all have our own subjective criteria for how we value a fragrance and what we want in a fragrance. What I'm referring to are the comments along the lines of "for a fragrance that costs $[x] the longevity should be greater", thereby implying that a fragrance is somehow less good, or should be worth less, if it has less longevity. Everyone should - and will - buy what they value but also simultaneously acknowledge that longevity doesn't make a fragrance any 'better' then the would the inclusion of a note or accord. You wouldn't say "for a fragrance that costs $[x] it should contain vanilla (or whatever note)" - a fragrance it what it is. Plus I would encourage people who highly value longevity to focus more on the artistry of the composition itself and worry less about longevity. For example I enjoy Jicky more then nearly any other fragrance in existence but it will NOT last more then 2 hours on my skin, no matter how much, or what concentration, I apply. This doesn't make it bad or worth less, this is just what Jicky is.

    Excellent point someone made above about the difference between how long sillage lasts vs. how long a perfume lingers on the skin closely. When I wrist-sample perfumes at work or while taking long car trips I'm always surprised how long a perfume on my wrist is noticeable. I probably wouldn't notice many of these perfumes coming off my neck, but the skin on my wrist is still very much scented for many hours.

    Consider this anectode: a few years back a college buddy of mine visited for the weekend. Before we went out for the day my friend took one of my more subtle fragrances and gave himself two sprays on the neck. Hours later he told me he had to find a place to wash up because he couldn't take the aroma wafting off his neck anymore. I couldn't smell a darn thing coming off of him, even though we were in a car. I wouldn't discount the extent to which those of us who are constantly sampling perfume have olfactory senses that tune out constant, ongoing aromas.

  27. #27

    Default Re: Objective Evidence

    Quote Originally Posted by Renato View Post
    There is no need to rely on our assertions with respect to longevity. Here is a test you can do at home.

    Get two jumpers or cardigans. Spray some scent on their inside, near the underarm area, then leave the jumpers out in the open on a bed or something.

    If you spray Joop Homme, you will still smell it there 12 days later.
    Too true! I have a few sweaters from the mid 1990s stored in my parents basement; they still smell faintly of Joop!.

    Not counting Joop! I've found By Kilian's A Taste of Heaven and Caron Pour un Homme to have the best longevity of all my scents (and they happen to smell almost exactly the same). A Taste of Heaven lasted handsomely through an entire day of flying and wandering around airports, and it was still projecting fairly well when I went to bed at midnight.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Objective Evidence

    Quote Originally Posted by Gilgamesh2003 View Post
    Too true! I have a few sweaters from the mid 1990s stored in my parents basement; they still smell faintly of Joop!.

    Not counting Joop! I've found By Kilian's A Taste of Heaven and Caron Pour un Homme to have the best longevity of all my scents (and they happen to smell almost exactly the same). A Taste of Heaven lasted handsomely through an entire day of flying and wandering around airports, and it was still projecting fairly well when I went to bed at midnight.
    Joop lasting from the mid 90s! I would like to replicate that test, but if I start now I'd have to wait till 2026.

    I forgot to mention in my earlier post that when my wife machine washes my shirts, usually they come back smelling nice and clean from all the hot water and detergent. But I've had a few shirts go through the machine wash and after ironing noticing that they still smell strongly of some scents.

    I haven't tried Killian, but agree Caron is very good longevity wise.

    In these discussions about longevity, and people who say one doesn't need it, I subscribe to the notion that if something smells good, I want it to smell good for as long as possible, not for as short as possible. For example, 4711 is a great smelling scent, but given that it lasts somewhere between 5 and ten minutes on most people, I don't see the point of it - other than for smelling great while one uses it to clean eye glasses.
    Regards,
    Renato

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    These constant lasting power threads always have me thinking there must be something else going in relation to male performance.

    Most fragrances have a lot better longevity than the average review indicates, and any perfumer will tell you that you have to learn to smell. Fragrances can easily last for twenty four hours or more, especially those with the appropriate amount of animalic ingedients.
    Last edited by pluran; 4th May 2011 at 06:25 AM.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Is Longevity BS?

    Longevity is what it is, and it seems like perception of it differs from from nose to nose. That would be obvious from the seemingly conflicting assessments in the reviews here. Longevity is important to some, like me, but not to others. Personally, great quality with little longevity is a no-no. Appreciating a fragrance while wearing it fully, for as long as possible, is more important than just acknowledging the quality of its blending, the dynamics of it's notes/accords, etc, etc. Sweeping statements as to the relevance or otherwise of longevity therefore do not add much value in a fragrance-appreciation forum like this. Know what is important to you and pursue it, enjoyably.
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