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  1. #1

    Default Amber (fossilised)

    Fossilised Amber Oil, Eden Botanicals: Pungent, woody, smoky and leathery with very little sweetness. Dense, dark and very rugged, with hardly any olfactory association to the generally perceived notion of amber. It smells like labdanum mixed with birch tar at a 1:2 ratio.

  2. #2
    Basenotes Member xXClockwork's Avatar
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    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    This sounds like a delicious scent!

  3. #3

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    [Deleting my message. This fossilized amber business is confusing to me.]
    "You...put on cologne to write?"(From Midnight in Paris)

    Stop by for a chat: http://perfumedletters.wordpress.com/
    My book reviews: http://www.nstperfume.com/author/Cheryl/

  4. #4

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Interesting.

    Amber is often used in fragrance marketing as a shorthand for ambergris, but occasionally it does mean fossil amber, the 'essential oil' of which is indeed produced by the destructive distillation of the amber waste and dust from the jewellery trade and amber of too poor a quality for jewellery use. Despite the claim that it isn't used in perfumery it is used, just as many other ingredients that don't smell all that lovely by themselves are.

    The type of amber being described by mountainroseherbs is more usually described as Storax to mean any of the sweetgum oils, or as Styrax Levant to mean the specific product of Liquidamber orientalis, though that resin / oil does go under a number of other names too.

    The use of the term Amber Oil to mean a blend of oils including many different ingredients that vary with the supplier, but have in common a dark amber colour and resinous scent, seems to be limited to the aromatherapy market.
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  5. #5
    Basenotes Member lisa16's Avatar
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    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    In the beginning I was really confused by this too and couldn't figure out why there seemed to be at least two different amber notes. One was described as animalic and fatty, the other was resinous and sweet. I found this entry in wikipedia, however:

    "Amber is fossilized tree resin (not sap), which has been appreciated for its color and natural beauty since Neolithic times.[2] Amber is used as an ingredient in perfumes, as a healing agent in folk medicine, and as jewelry."

    The article goes on to say:
    Scent of amber and amber perfumery

    "In ancient China it was customary to burn amber during large festivities. If amber is heated under the right conditions, oil of amber is produced, and in past times this was combined carefully with nitric acid to create "artificial musk" – a resin with a peculiar musky odor. Although when burned, amber does give off a characteristic "pinewood" fragrance, modern products, such as perfume, do not normally use actual amber. This is due to the fact that fossilized amber produces very little scent. In perfumery, scents referred to as “amber” are often created and patented to emulate the opulent golden warmth of the fossil. The modern name for amber is thought to come from the Arabic word, ambar, meaning ambergris.[8] Ambergris is the waxy aromatic substance created in the intestines of sperm whales and was used in making perfumes both in ancient times as well as modern. The scent of amber was originally derived from emulating the scent of ambergris and/or labdanum but due to the endangered status of the sperm whale the scent of amber is now largely derived from labdanum.[38] The term “amber” is loosely used to describe a scent that is warm, musky, rich and honey-like, and also somewhat oriental and earthy. It can be synthetically created or derived from natural resins. When derived from natural resins it is most often created out of labdanum. Benzoin is usually part of the recipe. Vanilla and cloves are sometimes used to enhance the aroma.

    "Amber" perfumes may be created using combinations of labdanum, benzoin resin, copal (itself a type of tree resin used in incense manufacture), vanilla, Dammara resin and/or synthetic materials."

    If you read the Lovejoy mysteries, in one he takes bits of fossilized amber fround on the beach and melts them together using a candle to create a gem. Because I had read this, I atempted to do this with a nice piece of amber jewelry I had that had been damaged by immersion in a jewelry cleaner (should have read the find print on that cleaner....) I thought I could kind of "heal" it by patially melting it. No such luck.

    But I did learn that when the fossilized amber is heated, it does emit a strong resinous scent that is quite pleasant. It also burns easily.

    I bet if you crushed some amber (it will make a kind of dust) and heat it gently in some kind of recepticle, you would get a usuable product.
    homo sum humani a me nihil alienum puto

  6. #6

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Thanks so much, Chris! Just when I thought I finally had a handle on the various resins called "amber vs. ambergris, I was stumped by the what I thought was a myth: use of fossilized amber (the jewelry "stone") in perfume was a myth. Thanks for explaining how this works.
    "You...put on cologne to write?"(From Midnight in Paris)

    Stop by for a chat: http://perfumedletters.wordpress.com/
    My book reviews: http://www.nstperfume.com/author/Cheryl/

  7. #7

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    I happen to love my fossilized amber and would like to make a scent based on it, attenuating it where needed but retaining its complex character. It's extremely potent and long lasting.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Quote Originally Posted by James Peterson View Post
    I happen to love my fossilized amber and would like to make a scent based on it, attenuating it where needed but retaining its complex character. It's extremely potent and long lasting.
    Yes I can see the attraction. Is yours an Eden Botanicals product, one you made yourself or something else?
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Yes, it's Eden Botanicals.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Thanks, I may have to invest.

    Meanwhile, here is what Arctander says about it:

    Amber pieces which are unfit for jewelry as well as dust and residues from the gem industry, etc. are submitted to dry distillation in order to yield the so-called Succinol or Crude Amber Oil. Crude (or pyroligneous) Amber Oil is a dark amber-colored or brownish, but clear oily liquid. Its odor is smoky, tarlike, resinous, with a distinct resemblance to the odor of tanned leather . . . it blends excellently with labdanum, castoreum, ionones, amylsalicylate, etc. and it is sweetened with cananga oil, zingerone, etc. for typical ďleatherĒ bases, e.g. in menís colognes and after-shaves.
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Hi Chris, Thanks for forwarding the Arctander quote. It looks like I might have to invest in those books after all.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    I just (blind) bought a 1/4 oz. vial of this based on my previous experience with EB's amber 'blends'. umm, shoulda grabbed a tester first! very very smoky, like a burned piece of leather and ancient wood. I started to wonder if this might be one of the ingredients in Amouage Tribute, but it's stronger and less tamed than the smokiness of that concoction. Of course, this is an apples to oranges comparison. The only other natural scent I've come across with this depth (albeit in a *totally* different way) is oak moss. The latter is more fecund and watery, whereas I find the fossilized amber to be "high desert fired wood lost to dust storms" kind of smell. Based on my tastes, 1/4 oz was WAY more than I will use in blends. I've placed a tiny bit in a mason jar and intend to track changes in its aroma over the next couple of months to see what transpires. If it mellows and sweetens a bit, I will be much more likely to use it.

  13. #13
    Super Member racuda's Avatar
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    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Quote Originally Posted by saichele View Post
    I just (blind) bought a 1/4 oz. vial of this based on my previous experience with EB's amber 'blends'. umm, shoulda grabbed a tester first! very very smoky, like a burned piece of leather and ancient wood. I started to wonder if this might be one of the ingredients in Amouage Tribute, but it's stronger and less tamed than the smokiness of that concoction. Of course, this is an apples to oranges comparison. The only other natural scent I've come across with this depth (albeit in a *totally* different way) is oak moss. The latter is more fecund and watery, whereas I find the fossilized amber to be "high desert fired wood lost to dust storms" kind of smell. Based on my tastes, 1/4 oz was WAY more than I will use in blends. I've placed a tiny bit in a mason jar and intend to track changes in its aroma over the next couple of months to see what transpires. If it mellows and sweetens a bit, I will be much more likely to use it.
    Just curious if your opinion has changed over the last four months. I'm getting ready to place an order with Eden and would like some feedback if you can provide it.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    I also very much like the Eden amber. It's complex and mysterious and I've used it successfully in my blends, albeit carefully. I find it works well with sandalwood and oud.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I also very much like the Eden amber. It's complex and mysterious and I've used it successfully in my blends, albeit carefully. I find it works well with sandalwood and oud.

  15. #15
    hednic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Quote Originally Posted by Nostalgie View Post
    Thanks so much, Chris! Just when I thought I finally had a handle on the various resins called "amber vs. ambergris, I was stumped by the what I thought was a myth: use of fossilized amber (the jewelry "stone") in perfume was a myth. Thanks for explaining how this works.
    This puzzled me for a long time also. Much clearer now.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    I have the Eden fossilized amber too... I like it quite a bit but I'm curious, has anybody else ever made the Vaseline (petroleum jelly) connection in the aroma? I never hear that mentioned and it's always a dominant note for me... perhaps I got a funky batch.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Quote Originally Posted by moogsauce View Post
    I have the Eden fossilized amber too... I like it quite a bit but I'm curious, has anybody else ever made the Vaseline (petroleum jelly) connection in the aroma? I never hear that mentioned and it's always a dominant note for me... perhaps I got a funky batch.
    I have one from a different source, it smells magical, one of the few to get an instant 'WOW' reaction.
    It is very potent and the drydown is most pleasant and outlasts most other ingredients.
    Initially and in high concentrations it gives me a turpentine note, possibly some petroleum products
    but not really vaseline.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Amber (fossilised)

    Just applied on skin @ 5%

    Very very old wood, leather, bone-dry resin, dusty/old book, touch of clay and dirt, rubber/latex...

    ..and vaseline. Much less so on my skin, mind you.

    It makes sense to me... petroleum is like, fossil juice. Still, I'd like to know if anybody else makes the connection.

    On a more subjective note... something about it very much reminds of small town hockey rinks (eh?)
    Last edited by moogsauce; 9th April 2014 at 04:58 AM.

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