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  1. #1
    DeepSilence
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    Exclamation Difference between French, American, Italian, British, Arabian... fragrances

    Hi Everyone

    Really are there obvious differences between this countries's fragrances?
    If i want to give a clue, for example we can recognize Arabian fragrances easily, Oud and Rose notes are approximately in all of them(Except Ajmals. and i have not tried any Amouage i don't know about them), Very long lasting, Strong,...
    But what about others? Do they use different ways for making their fragrances?
    Is there a special note that for example American like to use it frequently but Italian don't?
    I was curious when i saw Daniel has made a thread for Italian fragrances that i don't know many things about them. So i decided to make a developed discussion for all countries.
    Thanks for help.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Difference between French, American, Italian, British, Arabian... fragrances

    this is how I feel about them:
    French: Vanilla, Civet, Rose, Lavender . Warm and animalic
    Italian: Herbs, Neroli, Bergamot, Orange . Bracing and ballsy.
    British: Conifers, Lavender, Sandalwood . Invigorating and Soothing
    Arabian: Saffron, Oud, Rose, Jasmin, Resins - "exotic" luxurious "medicinal"

    I have no associations with american fragrances.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Difference between French, American, Italian, British, Arabian... fragrances

    The western perfume industry is now wholly international, so differences are vanishing. But anyway, my stereotype for Italian fragrances is fresh, citrusy, herbal and pine, relaxed open shirted fragrances that work well in warm weather (such as the prototypical Pino silvestre, or the Acqua di Parma range).

    Americans used to have a certain confidence, almost cowbody brashness, as exemplified by many Estee Lauders. More recently, though, I feel that Americans have come to require a perfume to project an unerring impression of meticulous hygiene, twice-daily showers, and absence of sweat and bacteria. Hence the universal preference for sharp, chemical, sporty materials that plague the current masculine perfumery.

    I feel that most English brands are now focused on luring tourist towards traditional-looking, overpriced non-entities.

    cacio

  4. #4
    hednic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Difference between French, American, Italian, British, Arabian... fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by DeepSilence View Post
    Really are there obvious differences between this countries's fragrances?
    IMHO most definitely.

  5. #5
    DeepSilence
    Guest

    Default Re: Difference between French, American, Italian, British, Arabian... fragrances

    Thank you everyone, I didn't know. your posts were very helpful.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Difference between French, American, Italian, British, Arabian... fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post
    The western perfume industry is now wholly international, so differences are vanishing. But anyway, my stereotype for Italian fragrances is fresh, citrusy, herbal and pine, relaxed open shirted fragrances that work well in warm weather (such as the prototypical Pino silvestre, or the Acqua di Parma range).

    Americans used to have a certain confidence, almost cowbody brashness, as exemplified by many Estee Lauders. More recently, though, I feel that Americans have come to require a perfume to project an unerring impression of meticulous hygiene, twice-daily showers, and absence of sweat and bacteria. Hence the universal preference for sharp, chemical, sporty materials that plague the current masculine perfumery.

    I feel that most English brands are now focused on luring tourist towards traditional-looking, overpriced non-entities.

    cacio
    pretty exaustive


    Discover my Guest Reviewer Of The Day here

  7. #7

    Default Re: Difference between French, American, Italian, British, Arabian... fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post
    The western perfume industry is now wholly international, so differences are vanishing. But anyway, my stereotype for Italian fragrances is fresh, citrusy, herbal and pine, relaxed open shirted fragrances that work well in warm weather (such as the prototypical Pino silvestre, or the Acqua di Parma range).

    Americans used to have a certain confidence, almost cowbody brashness, as exemplified by many Estee Lauders. More recently, though, I feel that Americans have come to require a perfume to project an unerring impression of meticulous hygiene, twice-daily showers, and absence of sweat and bacteria. Hence the universal preference for sharp, chemical, sporty materials that plague the current masculine perfumery.

    I feel that most English brands are now focused on luring tourist towards traditional-looking, overpriced non-entities.

    cacio
    Very good post, +1

  8. #8
    Olfacta's Avatar
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    Default Re: Difference between French, American, Italian, British, Arabian... fragrances

    Not much to add except that, based on fragrances I've tried, the Italian ones seem to be the most in-your-face, in a good way, not afraid to be perfume. The French make so many things that it's hard to categorize French fragrance, at least for me. The Americans are either cheap, focus-grouped crap, puny little watery things or balls-out Estee Lauder, that scream loud and long. The British fragrances I've tried tend to be quite woody -- lots of iso-e-super -- without as much animal heart as the French.
    Olfacta
    also at http://olfactarama.blogspot.com
    Musings and random thoughts about the genie in the bottle

  9. #9
    Olfacta's Avatar
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    Default Re: Difference between French, American, Italian, British, Arabian... fragrances

    Oh, I forgot the Arabian! Rose, oud, resins, spices. I love the idea of a highly perfumed culture. Amouage Lyric for Women is one of my all time favorites.
    Olfacta
    also at http://olfactarama.blogspot.com
    Musings and random thoughts about the genie in the bottle

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