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  1. #1

    Default L'interdit, loveliness in a bottle

    As you might be able to tell from the title, I have just received my bottle of L'interdit and have been delighted. I had a sample of both Le De and L'interdit, and ordered Le De by mistake. I rectified that today.

    Notes are: Bergamot, Aldehydes, Rose, Jasmine, Peach, Strawberry, Iris Vetiver, Amber

    This is a classic soft floral, blended to perfection, along the lines of a 24 Faubourg or a Le Dix. In fact, for those who truly miss their Le Dix, I would suggest you try this one. It is not the same in its notes, but is very similar in character.

    L'interdit is fairly linear, and doesn't change much in the dry down, perhaps bringing out a little amber, a little vanilla. I don't detect the vetiver, but then I'm pretty much a perfumer beginner, still on my 'L Plates'. But that's okay by me because of the gorgeous floral harmony achieved by the perfumer.

    I have the current EDT, which I have heard bemoaned often as not being close enough to the classic fifties perfume that Audrey Hepburn wore. Well, I was a baby in the fifties, and don't remember the original, so I can't judge.

    I just think this is a little gem in its own right. So if you love that classic French style floral accord, a little sweetness in your perfume, something essentially feminine and soft, then give this one a try.

    Try not to be influenced by those who talk about dusty, stale, a travesty of reformulation. Judge it for yourself. I suspect that many people probably don't like this type of traditional floral anyway. Look at the number of times Chanel 5 is criticised for being just what it is, yet it continues to sell in large numbers generation after generation. They must be doing something right.

    Cheers
    LiliB

  2. #2

    Default Re: L'interdit, loveliness in a bottle

    I have to speak up, especially when it comes to such an iconic classic. The newer version may be lovely and pleasant enough, but by no means is it even a shadow of the scent created for Audrey Hepburn. I have smelt them side by side. Along with the re-issues of Le De, Givenchy III, and the others. All very pleasant, all much different from the originals.

    You may not like to hear about reformulations, nor purchase them (mainly I feel for a fear of obtaining old/off/musty/stale scents) but truth be told, there are many perfectly preserved vintage scents out there to be found.

    As you continue on your journey in the land of fragrance you will [hopefully] find yourself experiencing (or wanting to experience) the original formulations of classic scents and it will change your perceptions of these scents.

    As far as No 5 goes, it sells just because of its name, trust me on this I worked in the "industry" for a VERY long time and have experienced this firsthand many times.

    Do try to open yourself up to experiencing some of the vintage scents, you will be pleasantly surprised.
    Quand on boit l'eau, il faut penser sa source

  3. #3

    Default Re: L'interdit, loveliness in a bottle

    I take your points about the reformulations. However, the fact is these original perfumes are not being made anymore. And the endless criticism of what has been done in their place, could be counterproductive to people really enjoying the new types.

    I adore the new Givenchy III and don't particularly care whether it has been changed. And I fully intend to buy a bottle and to use it frequently. The argument just doesn't come into my decision to purchase.

    Perhaps the best thing the perfume companies could do is to give their reformulations a new name. That might close the argument properly.

    I have to disagree with what you say about Chanel 5. You can't sell something to people that is not what they want. I have found, particularly, men seem to adore it. And not just because their grandmothers or mothers smelt of it.

    I just wouldn't wear anything that didn't appeal to me, no matter how highly regarded it may be. Perfume is such a personal thing, so close to oneself and sense of self. I think very few people would seriously contemplate wearing anything that didn't bring the sort of pleasure that one gets from a perfume that truly fits one's personality

    For example, I read so much hype about 'En Passant' that I just had to try it. I wouldn't go across the street to buy it, I found it just awful. No amount of hype or recommendation will make me wear it. It just isn't me. When I make a purchasing decision, by buying what I choose to, I am discounting what isn't up to scratch at the same time.

    And yes, it would be nice to try some of the classic old formulations, but I can't buy full bottles of them, guaranteed to be perfect, and in large enough quantities to allow me full freedom in the wearing. I'm not closing my mind to new experience, I am simply being a realist about what I expect in my life. If I want, I want it, and if I have the means, I will get it. And I know the new bottle will be 100% perfect all the way through. And there are so many lovely current versions of classic perfumes, that it really doesn't matter what came before. I am here now, and so are they.

  4. #4

    Default Re: L'interdit, loveliness in a bottle

    What i try to do, if I love the current presentation of a classic, is to try to get my hands on some vintage (maybe only a sample) in order to judge myself.
    In the case of Tabac Blond... however hard I try, nobody has ever come up with a vintage version that smelled so drastically different, in fact the vintage TPC has is very close to the current and when checking back with owners of the vintage "under four eyes" they say the current is very good, indeed. So, this is intersting for me to decide myself. Next on my list is En Avion since I have fallen so hard for the current extrait.
    'My problem' with Guerlain is that I have mostly come by the vintage path to discover the classics with the exception of L'Heure Bleue (but I also own a vintage extrait now). There is a blog out there that really made me laugh, because it stated that the only good presentation of a Guerlain classic today was Shalimar and the others were fairly unrecognizable. Well, I feel totally the other way round. Guerlain has done an excellent job in my opinion on their classics (I am not applauding 'the need' to reformulate), but the current extrait of Shalimar is so stripped down compared tot the vintage that it is pointless ( the EdP is a much better way to go ).
    What I am trying to tell is that, if you love a classic, you might want to see (sample) what the presumably well preserved classic used to smell like and second, it is only you (don't lie to yourself, because it is the easier thing to do) to decide which one you still recognize and find well represented in its current condition.
    I also think it is not realistic to assume that very old vintage (depending on the components of a fragrance a lot) smelled originally exactly the way it does today due to ageing. As a rule of thumb for me anything prior to 1990 is prone to have notes that disintegrated or changed or turned. Leathers are probably a usually wonderful exception and vintage Shalimar extrait really seems to age like fine wine.

  5. #5

    Default Re: L'interdit, loveliness in a bottle

    I don't think anyone can show me that one perfume is demonstrably better, in any scientific way, than another. Certain of our senses can be checked objectively, but our sense of smell doesn't seem to be. Our sense of smell isn't always highly developed and is probably compromised by many things in our environment.

    Then there are the personal factors which determine which smells we like, and which we don't - the foods we eat, the smells in our environment, memories of people and places, to name just a few. I hate the smell of pear and cucumber in perfumes as an example. Just a little of either of these two ingredients turn me off completely. Yet I will gladly eat fresh pears, and cucumber is probably my favourite salad vegetable. Go figure.

    To put it another way, I often find there is one discordant note in a perfume that spoils it for me. Examples of this are Narcisse Noir and Terracotta Voile. Lots of others love these perfumes, but there is something in their composition that I just don't like. And once I smell that discordant note, the joy goes out of the experience for me.

    The serotonin rush just doesn't appear. And that's what we're all looking for in our perfumes, our favourite foods, our best wines etc.

    So I'm a simple enough soul to just sniff blithely and pass judgement on what is in front of me. If it pleases me, I'll probably buy a bottle and indulge myself. If there was an older much better version back in the 30s or 50s then 'che sera', I'll build a bridge and get over it. If I'd lived back then, I might have died in childbirth, been condemned to being barefoot and pregnant, lost a limb because of a minor infection, perhaps joined the millions who died after WWI from Spanish flu.

    I would certainly not lived the wonderful life I have during my time, had access to so much wisdom and knowledge on the net, or so much uncommitted money to enrich my existence. If I never smell a vintage L'interdit I will still be a blissfully happy person who is all too aware of how fortunate a life she has had.

  6. #6

    Default Re: L'interdit, loveliness in a bottle

    "I suspect that many people probably don't like this type of traditional floral anyway. "

    I have to respond to this part of your original post. It was an overly broad shot, imo.

    I certainly am a fan of floral perfumes, particularly floral aldehydic perfumes, which represent, to many, a classic style in the French tradition of perfumery. I also have worn the Givenchy fragrances in their original form for many years.

    I have smelled the two reformulations of L'Interdit and they are o.k. for what they are. But you know the saying "damned by faint praise". That's all I would have to offer. It's not a modernization or freshening or whatever the reformulators called it; disembowelment would be more like it. The shape is still there, but the substance is not. When I smell either of the L'Interdit reformulations, it's like encountering a hologram instead of a person.

    All I can say is I'm glad I started buying extras of L'Interdit in parfum every time I went through an international airport in the late days of the 20th century. Wish I'd done the same with Givenchy III and Le De.

    Glad to know that someone is enjoying the reformulated versions. After all, they'll be around for a long time.

  7. #7

    Default Re: L'interdit, loveliness in a bottle

    Is this really such a floral fragrance? I find it so powdery. I'm actually convinced that the original L'Interdit was the model for the original Amouage Gold. Does anybody get me?

  8. #8

    Default Re: L'interdit, loveliness in a bottle

    Quote Originally Posted by Jardanel View Post
    "I suspect that many people probably don't like this type of traditional floral anyway. "

    I have to respond to this part of your original post. It was an overly broad shot, imo.

    I certainly am a fan of floral perfumes, particularly floral aldehydic perfumes, which represent, to many, a classic style in the French tradition of perfumery. I also have worn the Givenchy fragrances in their original form for many years.

    I have smelled the two reformulations of L'Interdit and they are o.k. for what they are. But you know the saying "damned by faint praise". That's all I would have to offer. It's not a modernization or freshening or whatever the reformulators called it; disembowelment would be more like it. The shape is still there, but the substance is not. When I smell either of the L'Interdit reformulations, it's like encountering a hologram instead of a person.

    All I can say is I'm glad I started buying extras of L'Interdit in parfum every time I went through an international airport in the late days of the 20th century. Wish I'd done the same with Givenchy III and Le De.

    Glad to know that someone is enjoying the reformulated versions. After all, they'll be around for a long time.

    Bless you for preaching the truth. I am so happy that you made your post. I am with you 100% on these reformulations. I wore Givenchy III (vintage) today, I am now wearing Le De (vintage) and there is just no comparison to the newer. So yes, power to those who enjoy the newer, but nothing like the originals.
    Quand on boit l'eau, il faut penser sa source

  9. #9
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    Default Re: L'interdit, loveliness in a bottle

    Quote Originally Posted by Jardanel View Post
    It's not a modernization or freshening or whatever the reformulators called it; disembowelment would be more like it. The shape is still there, but the substance is not. When I smell either of the L'Interdit reformulations, it's like encountering a hologram instead of a person.
    I totally agree with Jardanel and Brielle, it's sad that so many wonderful classics have been reduced to a totally inferior product. I knew a few had changed dramatically, but I've recently tried several vintage scents from TPC. It's definitely worth the effort to track down the vintage versions. Jardanel hit the nail on the head, comparing the two "it's like encountering a hologram instead of a person."

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