Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Default Scent as prepackaged persona

    Anyone reading this board knows very well what frag marketing copy is like. Click over to basically any site that sells perfume, and you'll be presented with an array of Daring, Tender, Sexy, Classic, Modern, Refreshing, Exotic, Surprising, Bold, Gentle, Whatever. As if these were smells, or traits we could really acquire from smells. And we reject these descriptions as the rubbish they are.

    And then, of course, we turn around and do it ourselves, in only slightly different terms. We ask each other for personal recommendations for scents that will make us sexier or display our sophistication or cheer us up. We reject or praise scents on the basis of who they seem to encourage us to be - not always, but often enough. (I don't know what the equivalents on the men's side would be, but look at the reviews for Bandit and Princess. We're not talking about a big leather and a vanilla gourmand, we're talking about Constructed Identity, In Capital Letters.)

    I'm guilty of it myself, of course. If you asked me to go over to my stash and pull out the Old Lady options, or the Romantic ones, or the ones that would best express my Inner Airhead or Corporate Bitch-Queen Alter Ego, I could do it in seconds.

    But really, truly, in your experience, does a scent have that much to say about who wears it? Does a complex scent mark or make a complex personality? Sweet ditto, brisk ditto, dark ditto? Or is it finally about the leather and the vanilla?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Scent as prepackaged persona

    We are affected by every data we acquire and associate.
    It is not possible for anyone who can smell to not to disregard the scent completely.
    We have experiences, expectations and associations.
    What everyone translates it to is not universal though.

    It's not just leather and vanilla.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Scent as prepackaged persona

    Scents do elicit certain reactions - so in principle they could be used to define a certain personality. In a way, it's a little bit like clothes. Clothes can say a lot about a person, though many times they don't really because the person doesn't pay attention.

    The first impression, say, is not to take seriously a person who is wearing a cloying fruity floral, even if she has an MBA and runs a company. It's as if she was wearing pink and had long pink nails and bleached blonde hair. Viceversa, if somebody is wearing, just to make your example, Bandit, I feel that the person wants to make a statement.

    Of course, what the smell could say is typically unrelated to what advertisements claim (in any case, 90 percent of the times, ads are about sex, for which unfortunately perfumes can so much).

    cacio

  4. #4
    teardrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The south of England
    Posts
    6,227
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Scent as prepackaged persona

    Quote Originally Posted by blkbrd View Post
    We reject or praise scents on the basis of who they seem to encourage us to be - not always, but often enough. (I don't know what the equivalents on the men's side would be...

    I'm guilty of it myself, of course. If you asked me to go over to my stash and pull out the Old Lady options, or the Romantic ones, or the ones that would best express my Inner Airhead or Corporate Bitch-Queen Alter Ego, I could do it in seconds.
    A case in point "on the men's side" is Le Male; there's a thread about it right now which made me think "are we talking about the smell or the image here?" But of course our sense of smell is so closely tied up with associations, emotional responses & memories that these things cannot easily be separated.

    l think most of us could pull out different fragrances from our wardrobes to express certain parts of our personalities that we wish to express at a given moment. But a fragrance cannot change a personality.

    No, it is not just about leather & vanilla.
    "What is this secret connection between the soul, and sea, clouds and perfumes? The soul itself appears to be sea, cloud and perfume..." - from Zorba the Greek by Nikos Kazantzakis.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Scent as prepackaged persona

    I came across an apposite quote by Monsieur Lutens last night:

    Le parfum est un ami qui parle pour vous. "Perfume is a friend who speaks for you".

  6. #6

    Default Re: Scent as prepackaged persona

    That's a lovely quote, gandhajala! I like it very much.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Scent as prepackaged persona

    Quote Originally Posted by gandhajala View Post
    I came across an apposite quote by Monsieur Lutens last night:

    Le parfum est un ami qui parle pour vous. "Perfume is a friend who speaks for you".
    Perfect

  8. #8

    Default Re: Scent as prepackaged persona

    Very interesting thread, blkbrd. I would like to answer the question with William Blake quote:
    The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Scent as prepackaged persona

    Quote Originally Posted by Habanitta View Post
    Very interesting thread, blkbrd. I would like to answer the question with William Blake quote:
    The tree which moves some to tears of joy is in the eyes of others only a green thing that stands in the way.
    That is also a lovely quote, Habanitta.

    I usually like sweet scents, with a ton of vanilla, probably because the associations that come with it are good ones for me. I could imagine, if placed in a "Clockwork Orange" setting, I could be dis-enamoured of my vanilla associations. Currently, where I work, I must on occasion stop by the Billing Dept. to clarify certain items on an account. The entire building smells of vanilla and some other kind of synthetic edible food flavoring. I imagine if I had to go to Billing a lot, and someone pried my eyes open with retractors, I would eventually get sick of my vanilla scents.
    "Embrace those things which give you pleasure, after all, there is so much mediocrity to endure elsewhere." -- Inselaffe

Similar Threads

  1. Most underrated scent? Signature Scent? Guilty Pleasure Scent?
    By YRAMEN in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 26th December 2012, 11:06 PM
  2. Replies: 44
    Last Post: 22nd December 2009, 08:14 PM
  3. Replies: 16
    Last Post: 18th December 2008, 01:25 AM
  4. Is Rive Gauche a Summer scent, or a winter scent?
    By Juanamichi in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 21st May 2007, 05:11 PM
  5. Scent Tribes? Favorite Notes or Scent Types
    By JaimeB in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12th February 2007, 01:19 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000