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  1. #1

    Default Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Hello Gents,

    I've just read Le Mouchoir de Monsieur's review of Blenheim Bouquet by Penhaligon's.
    Heartbreaking and beautiful all at the same time.

    If you haven't read it I urge you to.

    Thanks,

    K.
    La vita breve, la morte vien.


    Wanted!!! Rectoverso Tea Tobacco by Ulric de Varens. PM Me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Beautifully written and expressed, very moving.

  3. #3
    hednic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Very nice.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Blenheim Bouquet is a scent with great possibilities of exploring, definitely calling for fitting reviews

  5. #5

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    My goodness: Thanks very much to all of you for having the patience to endure my often over-wrought reviews! I had no idea there was a thread ignited by Blenheim Bouquet. I do greatly enjoy writing these reviews, though as I mentioned to one of my BN friends, it takes a kind of "spasm" for me to actually write one, or a good one as it were. I'm not so certain I'm equipped to make judgements on ingredients--emotions, on the other hand, I read fluently. It's fascinating to me that certain people become so preoccupied with what's in a composition....if it's synthetic, natural, expensive, high quality etc: I think, a perfume should before all else be in tune with your inner self, regardless of what it's made of. Koala501 my top hat off to you! leMDM

  6. #6

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Very touching indeed, thanks for the heads up.
    Smellin good

  7. #7

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Hear, hear!

  8. #8

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    I just noticed that this thread appears in the "Male Fragrance" discussion group of threads. I had no idea there was such a thing. Below I have tried to piece together bits of a private conversation I had on BN with a young man who, having read one of my own threads, both of which are in "General Fragrance," contacted me all contrite and perplexed that he felt compelled to wear "Arpege," and wondered if this was "OK," since "Arpege" is a scent originally designed for women. Let's see if it works. (This young man was clearly shaken by some observation that Luca Turin had made that "Arpege" was feminine or womanly in some way: Since this is my first foray into "Male Fragrance" discussion groups, this content contains opinions that I would hope all of we male fragrance fanciers out there epouse)
    Luca Turin's opinion should not count for you, for me, or for anyone. The French have a saying that I find quite useful which runs thus: "les gouts et les couleurs ne se discutent pas" translating: "Tastes and Colours should never be discussed" I am a true believer in this and, I suspect, that is why my reviews are more focused on emotion and less on "wear it/don't wear it" (with the exception of a few I suppose, like that nasty "Oxford& Cambridge" which is plainly offensive--even for me, a lavender lover) I think, with regards to your choice to wear "Arpege," that this is entirely dependent on what kind of man you are, and how "Arpege" translates that inner spirit: At this point in history it matters little whether the comp was designed for a man or a woman, only "Does the comp translate the human," which, in this instance, is a question only you can answer. It is a fact that most fragrances from the 20's smell more like men's fragrances of today, a perfect example being "vol de nuit," but there are so many: Arpege is one of them. As far as "being" masculine or feminine, it need not be either if you chose to wear it, It simply must somehow sublimate who you are as an human. I, for instance, wear "Jicky" because I feel it speaks volumes about my personality. I am very tall, taller than most everyone, quite thin, and I wear strange clothes, mostly because I have to have all of my clothes custom made, which allows me a great amount of freedom to do what others wouldn't. I also have an horror of hairdressers so I wear my hear quite long. I have a phobia of blades, so I don't shave, leaving me with a full beard and mustache. People stare at me in the street and everywhere I go I cause a kind of commotion. In spite of this, I have been blessed with an excellent amount of success in my life. There is no "label" that I can accept per my "genre," to the great frustration of all and sundry: Gay, Straight, Bi, Eccentric, Individualist, Rebel, Hippie, Right wing/Left wing: None of these fit me, just as clothes hanging in a store wont fit me, and this is clear to those who know me well. Jicky, to me, "translates" all of this: It is the very essence of ambiguity and I have never found another perfume that spells out all of the complexities of my existence, orchestrated of course by God and an human mind more perfectly. En Avion, for instance: By all means, is a stunning thing--but you see I can not wear such a beautiful, refined and elegant perfume--because, somehow, it is too beautiful...too remarkable...and, as I have explained, I have to be careful: Already, I am a kind of walking circus act: Wearing such a spectacular perfume would become farcical on me. Now, you, I challenge you to apply this kind of self analysis to yourself. If you are earnest in your approach to it, you will have your answer. The fact that "Arpege" was created for women should not factor into your internal discussion. In the matter of fragrant choices, nobody's opinion counts more than your own.
    Here, though, I must clarify: I think, note, "I think," meaning I can't profess to know, but it would seem to me that if a scent projects what the wearer is trying to convey, then there is a potential for mismatch. Example: Were i to wear a scent that would suggest what it is I would "try" to be, if I tried, it would be something very shy and tame and barely there at all: I have a fondness for Canoe, for example, and I like Old Spice. I wish that somehow I could be "the Old Spice Guy" because he is everything I am not, yet secretly, I'm sure I would enjoy being. Even "Eau du Coq," or "Agua Lavanda," both very discrete and somewhat bland, even these, which i wear (both make excellent mosquito repellent) are a kind of disguise for me: I will wear them when I try to go unnoticed, which is the effect I covet when I have the energy to "try." Unfortunately, though, I rarely have this energy--and so I wear Jicky because I know for a fact that it "smells like me" and, according to all and sundry, "it smells like me." It's *always* smelled like me, since I was a young lad--which was quite awhile ago--and it also "has my name on it." (too intricate of a plot to reveal here) but that is how i found it in the first instance: Quite a coincidence. The two fragrances I have worn, counting "Mouchoir de Monsieur" as a kind of "Winter Jicky," (it was made out of Jicky) are two that sort of just fell upon me: Jicky and English Fern. Both, to me, "translate" all of the bits and pieces of what God gave me--interestingly, both are ferns, both are somewhat of the same era: I wore English Fern because that's what my mother gave me--I wore "Pour un Homme" (Caron) when I wanted to be a rebel and grow up and seduce girls: I found it so sophisticated and worldly--and then I wore "Jicky" because I saw it in the window at Guerlain and thought: “How amusing! that perfume has my name on it! I must go and smell it”--and since that day I have been loyal to it: The second I smelled it, I knew. The main element here is this: Neither you, nor your perfume, should "try" to convey anything. The trick is to find the scent that fits naturally, with no effort, and little fanfare, and then you will have your signature.
    Hopefully, not too much information. Hopefully, food for thought. leMDM

  9. #9

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    I adore Mouchoir's review of Jicky. Poetic and thoughtful, with a dash of history thrown in.
    "No sweet perfume ever tortured me more than this." Desert Rose by Sting and Cheb Mami, Album 1999.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Brilliant Le Mouchoir, You've got a real fan here!
    La vita breve, la morte vien.


    Wanted!!! Rectoverso Tea Tobacco by Ulric de Varens. PM Me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  11. #11

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by Primrose View Post
    I adore Mouchoir's review of Jicky. Poetic and thoughtful, with a dash of history thrown in.
    I adore JICKY in all its forms. Ever since reading MdM's review my enjoyment of it has grown as now upon application I hear in my head someone exclaiming "It smells like feet!". It never fails to make me smile.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by loungeboy View Post
    I adore JICKY in all its forms. Ever since reading MdM's review my enjoyment of it has grown as now upon application I hear in my head someone exclaiming "It smells like feet!". It never fails to make me smile.
    Loungeboy, I thought that quote was funny, too!
    "No sweet perfume ever tortured me more than this." Desert Rose by Sting and Cheb Mami, Album 1999.

  13. #13
    Dependent pluran's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by le mouchoir de monsieur View Post
    .......(This young man was clearly shaken by some observation that Luca Turin had made that "Arpege" was feminine or womanly in some way.........
    That's misinformation:

    Arpege is marketed to women. Luca Turin recommended it as a fragrance for men to try.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Another fan of Le Mouchoir's reviews. Go and read the others, they are equally beautiful.
    Keep them coming, Monsieur!
    l'air libre les oiseaux ont eux aussi le vertige (camille)

  15. #15

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by lupo View Post
    Keep them coming, Monsieur!
    Count me in as another fan! My favorite is Nuit de Noel... so atmospheric!

  16. #16

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Thank you to all. I am so very appreciative. On Luca Turin: We all have our opinions, and we all have our tastes. This said, I personally am no fan of either Luca Turin, whom I have met, and even less of a fan of Chandler Burr, though him I have not met. If I misquoted Mr. Turin, I apologize for the "misinformation." I suspect the young man to whom I allude above must have made precisely that observation of his, that men should try Arpege, and not the other way around, as I recount above. To me, both pronouncements are one and the same coming from Mr. Turin. I'm well aware that many of you swear by any pronouncement that Luca Turin makes. I have read some of his writings, and I have had a conversation with him. Personally, I find this "cult" following he has to be a bit of a farce: He has a kind of arrogance, a way about his opinions that leaves no room for discussion, and, I'm afraid that my specific read on that is that I find it quite rude on any account, regardless of subject matter. It is a medically proven fact that every single one of our noses is different, and no body chemistry will render the same symphony of comp notes in precisely the same order, as even our food intake will effect this progression. Luca Turin obviously knows more than most about fragrance, but nobody in the world has the right to dismiss definitively one comp verses another simply because of credentials. Fragrance is a matter of taste--and each of us has the right to our own: Following dictates by the likes of Luca Turin is simply unfortunate. He could say that "X" comp is rubbish, and "Y" comp is superb--but, honestly, who cares what he says? There is no "right" or "wrong" in this realm: Many have accused me of issuing the same kind of dictates, which I assure all of you I would be incapable of doing: Granted, I personally found "Oxford&Cambridge" to be vile--interestingly, Tom Ford's new "Lavender Palm" is a point for point carbon copy of it. I personally found Houbigant's re-issue of "Fougere Royale" to be an absolute disaster: These are only my opinions. Many of you will say "Well, who cares about your opinions?" My answer to that would be: "Me. I care about them. I encourage all of you to develop your own opinions. If they differ from mine, that's just grand." Luca Turin never implies that--Luca Turin suggests in his writings and discussions that his is the last word on any comp. How can any of us be naive enough to believe him? There is one man, though, who, in my estimation, has a far better grasp on the subject than Luca Turin ever could: He also has something in spades that would appear to be missing in the vocabulary of Mr. Turin, and that is "Good Manners." That man, is Mr. Roja Dove. If any of you ever have the opportunity to listen to this man speak of perfumes, do anything you can to make that happen: I have never heard anyone speak with such poise and elegance as he on the subject. His discussions are never "lectures." They are poetry, and in the realm of fragrance, are we not more in the realm of romance than academia?

  17. #17

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Definitely a beautiful review. I like all of MdM's reviews.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."

  18. #18

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Scent met mr. Roja Dove.

    Hopefully he'll say something about the encounter.

    for swap/sale:





  19. #19

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    On Mr. Roja Dove: There was a time, perhaps well over five years ago, when Mr. Roja Dove was a kind of attache to the house of Guerlain. I can't recall what his title there was, though he at one point happened to give a discussion in a private club of which I am a member: We, the attendees, were all seated at tables in the main dining room of the club, and being served breakfast. It was a morning engagement. On each of our place settings, there was a blue box with a satin ribbon around it: It looked as if we each were being presented a wrist watch. Inside, was a crystal dauber, and a small microfiber draw string pouch. Many of us opened the box upon arrival, and a very small percentage of us knew exactly what it was, nor what we were meant to do with it. When the main breakfast course was finally lain before us, after coffee and orange juice, a petite French lady walked up to the dais before us, tapped on the microphone, and spoke of Mr. Dove, who would shortly make his appearance. "Dove" is pronounced "DOHV," as is the past tense of "to dive," and not as "dove" the bird. After this short introduction, an unassuming looking gentleman stepped up to the dais and tapped on the microphone. After wishing all of us "Good Morning," he tapped on it again and asked if we were all sure that he should use this contraption as he was convinced we'd all be quite sick of hearing his voice within minutes, and he would be happy to dispense with it. We in attendance all laughed and he replied: "No, very seriously. All of you will be asleep so much faster if I could just unplug it." Thus, it began. Roja Dove speaks in the most impeccably tuned and perfectly wrought English, with a velvety voice, and a slow, meaningful cadence. He began his discussion by telling the fabled story of the house of Guerlain from its inception as a chemists shop, all the way through to the present day. Certain periods he punctuated with scents, which he would soak on mouillettes that young attendants would pass among us--and he would describe why it was that, for instance, "Apres l'Ondee" breathed an aura of solitude and melancholy, or how precisely "Chamade" reflected the violent student uprisings that had built up to a crescendo in May of 1968. I remember specifically how he explained the word "Chamade," which is a kind of double-entendre in French, used to describe the startled heart of one enraptured by passion and also the drumroll that precedes a public execution. Holding the bottle to illustrate what looked to all of us to be a spade, he grasped it by its stopper and held it upside down, saying, "and here, you see, is that heart: Presented to you all, on a stick, like a popsicle, that you may perhaps wish to lick." Everything he said had a kind of poetry to it. Nothing at all sounded trite as he put it. He spoke slowly, and punctuated his words with very earnest movements of his eyes, which are quite large and expressive. At the end of his discussion, he explained to us that each of us were now equipped with a wand, and this wand, the crystal dauber, could produce magic in our lives, if only we would use it properly: He explained that, in possession of a stoppered bottle of perfume, we were never to use the stopper to apply the perfume, but that we should dip the wand into the juice, applying it not behind our ears, but at what he called "the birth" of the neck, and that it would have to be cleaned each time before dipping it back into the bottle. He illustrated this with an opened bottle of "Vol de Nuit," which he applied on the neck of one of the young ladies assisting him. When he finally finished his discussion, there was a "Question and Answer" segment. Nobody seemed to raise their hand, so I began: "Mr. Dove. Is it true that "Shalimar" was created by dumping synthetic vanilla into "Jicky?" (Yes) Mr. Dove. Was there really a young English rose called "Jicky?" (No) Mr. Dove.....and on it went--I just kept them coming. I'm quite shameless when it comes to this sort of thing, especially in a room full of dumb men who could not find a single question to ask. Finally, Mr. Dove stopped the show by announcing to all in attendance that the discussion was over, and that "You, Sir, are invited to continue your queries in private." (meaning me) Most everyone made a bee line to the door, some leaving their blue boxes on the table: I snagged and pocketed my neighbour's, so I have two. I ran straight up to him, and continued my personal interview, which lingered on for quite some time: Everything he said was enchanting, all of his movements were elfin and other-worldly. I remember he had bushy eyebrows and hairy wrists. Mostly, I remember that this man had a true understanding of the emotions and the passions that went into the perfumer's art: When he would hand you a mouillette, he himself would also smell it, and in his eyes you could see that he was truly experiencing the magic held captive in each crystal bottle. There was a quiet, humble quality about him, a kind of delicacy in all of his gestures. A true Gentleman of the highest order. When I walked away from our private chat, which must have lasted over an hour because the dining room of the club was completely cleaned and deserted by the time we left, I felt as if I had spoken to a kind of wizard...and to this day, I cherish, and use daily the "wand" he gave me--and secretly keep the second one I shamelessly stole in case it ever breaks......

  20. #20

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    I wish I could once be part of such an experience, le MdM! Wonderful story! Thanks for sharing!

  21. #21

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Thanks for sharing your experience! Roja sure is a fascinating person

  22. #22

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    I'm so happy to be able to stop in now and again to Basenotes, especially when I see posts from one of my very favorite posters, le Mouchoir de Monsieur!

  23. #23
    Dependent pluran's Avatar
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    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by le mouchoir de monsieur View Post
    ........That man, is Mr. Roja Dove. If any of you ever have the opportunity to listen to this man speak of perfumes, do anything you can to make that happen: I have never heard anyone speak with such poise and elegance as he on the subject. His discussions are never "lectures." They are poetry, and in the realm of fragrance, are we not more in the realm of romance than academia?
    Thanks.

    I think most people on Basenotes form their own opinions. I have heard Roja Dove speak. I like what he has to say, but it's largely pretentious, and I prefer to read Luca Turin for a variety of reasons, not just for his perceptions and descriptions of fragrances. :-)

  24. #24

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by koala501 View Post
    Hello Gents,

    I've just read Le Mouchoir de Monsieur's review of Blenheim Bouquet by Penhaligon's.
    Heartbreaking and beautiful all at the same time.

    If you haven't read it I urge you to.

    Thanks,

    K.
    I just have. It made everything else go quiet. It is very moving.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by pluran View Post
    Thanks.

    I think most people on Basenotes form their own opinions. I have heard Roja Dove speak. I like what he has to say, but it's largely pretentious, and I prefer to read Luca Turin for a variety of reasons, not just for his perceptions and descriptions of fragrances. :-)
    With regard to pretension, and opinion, how fascinating that this discussion has illustrated so deftly just how individual perceptions may vary. "Pretension," being a style effect deployed by those with much to prove, mostly to themselves, as the behaviour is seldom effective on others recipient, is a word I may have forgotten to include in the description of my meeting with Mr. Roja Dove: Had I my wits about me (I'm currently ailing and bed bound, which would explain my hours long presence on basenotes over the course of the last few days) I would have used it. It would have gone this way: "One of the most remarkable things about Mr. Roja Dove is his complete lack of pretension. His manners and speaking patterns come clearly from the heart. Obviously, this Gentleman is a true born Romantic, of which tribe there are, nowadays, scarce few veritable members." Furthermore, and in keeping with the term "Pretension," I'm afraid I could have made that word the main source of any analysis I would make of Luca Turin: His writings, his manners: There isn't much about Luca Turin that I personally don't find staunchly rooted in pretension. Isn't it amusing how all of us have different takes on these sorts of projective behaviours? By example: Recently, prompted by this thread, I went on to a contributors' profile page and read all of the reviews that particular member had written. I don't often do this, but, as stated above, I'm ailing and unwell and somewhat bed bound at the moment with much time to kill. No one need point out that my own reviews, read by others, must seem to seethe in "pretension" and all manner of other flowery affairs; many, though, people who actually know me, will attest to the fact that they merely read as I speak: These unfailingly will emit the same comment when subjected to reading reviews: "They just read like a transcript of you talking." I confess, I do write them in a kind of mental stream, often in a spasm, (witness H.O.T. Always) off of the top of my head, and rarely do I stop to ponder: I will proof read briefly, and on I go to press "submit." The result, to many, I am sure would read out as much pretentious drivel. Interestingly, this was precisely the effect I flared when reading the reviews of one contributor to this thread, who, apparently unknowingly lays it all out there very plainly, waxing on about personal possessions and pass times, denouncing the ever burgeoning sect of "Nouveaux Riches," hinting at self-perceived superiority in sexual prouesses and, as the French would say, "J'en passe." Pretension is perceived differently by all. The world over, we have become tribal: like sects. In mine, for instance, the current pretention du jour would consist of appearing publicly as a "Nouveau Pauvre." We do all have a very secret grand old time making sure it's clear to all that we're still driving our old cars, wearing our old clothes to shreds, and patching our roofs rather than buying a new home. Our briefcases may be alligator, but they are worn and beat up and scarred and scratched. Our blazers and suits may be bespoke, but they're all grating at the seam edges of perfectly wrought pocket flaps. The club, for instance, the one to which I allude above, has a very strict policy for new membership applications: Candidates must collect no less than three three written endorsements from members with at least five years tenure before being granted an interview. Just last week, I sat through one of these. When the candidate left the building, we all had a huddle: I am on the board, and the board has 15 members. During the discussion that followed, I said nothing. Usually, during these post interview discussions, certain board members will wince and raise their brows, clearly hoping I will find the mercy in my heart to finally shut up. After they had all compared notes and were preparing to cast their votes, someone looked my way and said: "You've been awfully quiet. We haven't heard one word out of you." My response: "I've nothing to say, really." One member, who always comments on my suits, chimed in: "What did you think of his suit?" Everybody looked eagerly at me as I inhaled to respond, simultaneously filling out my vote card, all clearly anticipated a long involved analytical diatribe. I gave a four word retort: "It was Tom Ford." Then, I checked "Negative" before inserting the card into its' envelope, sealing it, and standing up to insert it into the wood box.
    Everyone just kept staring at me, saying nothing, until finally someone said: "And?" to which I replied: "Tom Ford." I could tell that the tone in my voice was enough for all other fourteen board members to understand my implication, even though I'm certain more than half of them had no idea who Tom Ford is. The point being: As my mother would say: "A chacun son mauvais gout" -- a saying I adore. Direct translation: "To each his own bad taste."
    Last edited by le mouchoir de monsieur; 25th October 2011 at 09:19 PM.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by lupo View Post
    Another fan of Le Mouchoir's reviews. Go and read the others, they are equally beautiful.
    Keep them coming, Monsieur!
    I heartily agree ... enchantingly wonderful ...

  27. #27

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    someone looked my way and said: "You've been awfully quiet. We haven't heard one word out of you." My response: "I've nothing to say, really." One member, who always comments on my suits, chimed in: "What did you think of his suit?" Everybody looked eagerly at me as I inhaled to respond, simultaneously filling out my vote card, all clearly anticipated a long involved analytical diatribe. I gave a four word retort: "It was Tom Ford." Then, I checked "Negative" before inserting the card into its' envelope, sealing it, and standing up to insert it into the wood box.
    Everyone just kept staring at me, saying nothing, until finally someone said: "And?" to which I replied: "Tom Ford." I could tell that the tone in my voice was enough for all other fourteen board members to understand my implication, even though I'm certain more than half of them had no idea who Tom Ford is. The point being: As my mother would say: "A chacun son mauvais gout" -- a saying I adore. Direct translation: "To each his own bad taste."


    That made me laugh!!!! Made my day
    La vita breve, la morte vien.


    Wanted!!! Rectoverso Tea Tobacco by Ulric de Varens. PM Me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  28. #28

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    On the matter of pretentiousness, I think there may be an error. I wouldn't call a peacock pretentious, but I would a human. From what I've seen I think Roja Dove is sincerely what he seems to be. While Turin doesn't seem so, I'm not sure if it's just his act -if he is acting- making itself visible.

    On the matter of our Mouchoir de Monsieur for whom I use the adjective "our" with haste and joy, I also like his style a lot. He is so different from me that it's fascinating and I find no pretentiousness in him either. Surely one of the things most of us here have in common, is our love for diversity. He provides that to me to the fullest. It's even apparent to me now that while I am quick to refer to him as our own, I am still talking about him in a more distant manner. Probably also because of how alien he is to me. An exotic specimen who is also gifted with one of the things I'm most jealous of. An effortless quality in written and very likely spoken word.

    As a final digression, how can one not like internet?

  29. #29

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by sarıpatates View Post
    On the matter of pretentiousness, I think there may be an error. I wouldn't call a peacock pretentious, but I would a human. From what I've seen I think Roja Dove is sincerely what he seems to be. While Turin doesn't seem so, I'm not sure if it's just his act -if he is acting- making itself visible.

    On the matter of our Mouchoir de Monsieur for whom I use the adjective "our" with haste and joy, I also like his style a lot. He is so different from me that it's fascinating and I find no pretentiousness in him either. Surely one of the things most of us here have in common, is our love for diversity. He provides that to me to the fullest. It's even apparent to me now that while I am quick to refer to him as our own, I am still talking about him in a more distant manner. Probably also because of how alien he is to me. An exotic specimen who is also gifted with one of the things I'm most jealous of. An effortless quality in written and very likely spoken word.

    As a final digression, how can one not like internet?

    Well put! Aye aye sir!
    La vita breve, la morte vien.


    Wanted!!! Rectoverso Tea Tobacco by Ulric de Varens. PM Me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  30. #30

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by sarıpatates View Post

    On the matter of our Mouchoir de Monsieur for whom I use the adjective "our" with haste and joy, I also like his style a lot. He is so different from me that it's fascinating and I find no pretentiousness in him either. Surely one of the things most of us here have in common, is our love for diversity. He provides that to me to the fullest. It's even apparent to me now that while I am quick to refer to him as our own, I am still talking about him in a more distant manner. Probably also because of how alien he is to me.
    Such a lovely thing to say, and certainly I am at a loss to respond coherently. Very early on in my involvements with BN, back in the day when a whole group of us were writing the "Why?" chronicles, one of its initial contributors cornered me privately on PM and became quite aggressively unkind. I remember how shocked I was that "someone" -- "somewhere" had seen fit to address accusatory words to me regarding my involvements with BN. I remember when this discussion heated up: Surely you've all pieced together by now that I love a debate, she seethed and spattered and demanded to know why it was that I should contribute to BN--as she put it: "Why are you on basenotes really?" It was at that point that I knew there was some kind of misunderstanding. She had challenged me to a kind of duel publicly, on a thread, then, convinced I suppose there was no point in pursuing this publicly, she took to wielding her ires and frustrations in vicious PM's. To this day I still can't quite sort what it was that motivated her behaviour. Saripatates lends me the answer I should have served up to her back then in his comments above: I am on BN to exchange ideas with others, and in so doing become complete, and more confident, in my own. More concisely, are we not all here merely to share insights and observations, knowing as we do that a common bond of interest unites us all? I think it would be a wise thing that we all keep this in mind, that each one of us here is the teacher and the pupil of all the others: With BN each of us automatically inherits millions of trusted mentors, as do we each an equal number of trusting students. I myself am always happy and willing to be both, sometimes simultaneously. One of my best BN cohorts, As I am blessed with quite a few, taught me how to insert my new "signature," which you will see below. Another taught me so many things, many of which I could be banned for describing here. Still another got me on a fourteen hour flight across the world, to show me what it is like to sleep, and to wake up in a tent: Something I had never done. Every one of us has special insights and knowledge that only we possess; when we die, it's as if a whole library burns to the ground, reduced to nothing...nothing but ASH. So a full year later, I have that response--"Why am I on Basenotes really?"--Answer: To share, to learn, to distract, and to be distracted. From answer to question go I, fan that I am of Lewis Carroll and reverse-logic: You, who are all now on Basenotes, do you like my new signature?
    "...a Chacun son Mauvais Gout."

  31. #31

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    A great signature Mouchoir.

    To be an eternal student is a wonderful thing indeed in my book. We are all richer here for everyone's input.

    Bien faire et laisser dire!!!!
    La vita breve, la morte vien.


    Wanted!!! Rectoverso Tea Tobacco by Ulric de Varens. PM Me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  32. #32

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by le mouchoir de monsieur View Post
    Such a lovely thing to say, and certainly I am at a loss to respond coherently. Very early on in my involvements with BN, back in the day when a whole group of us were writing the "Why?" chronicles, one of its initial contributors cornered me privately on PM and became quite aggressively unkind. I remember how shocked I was that "someone" -- "somewhere" had seen fit to address accusatory words to me regarding my involvements with BN. I remember when this discussion heated up: Surely you've all pieced together by now that I love a debate, she seethed and spattered and demanded to know why it was that I should contribute to BN--as she put it: "Why are you on basenotes really?" It was at that point that I knew there was some kind of misunderstanding. She had challenged me to a kind of duel publicly, on a thread, then, convinced I suppose there was no point in pursuing this publicly, she took to wielding her ires and frustrations in vicious PM's. To this day I still can't quite sort what it was that motivated her behaviour. Saripatates lends me the answer I should have served up to her back then in his comments above: I am on BN to exchange ideas with others, and in so doing become complete, and more confident, in my own. More concisely, are we not all here merely to share insights and observations, knowing as we do that a common bond of interest unites us all? I think it would be a wise thing that we all keep this in mind, that each one of us here is the teacher and the pupil of all the others: With BN each of us automatically inherits millions of trusted mentors, as do we each an equal number of trusting students. I myself am always happy and willing to be both, sometimes simultaneously. One of my best BN cohorts, As I am blessed with quite a few, taught me how to insert my new "signature," which you will see below. Another taught me so many things, many of which I could be banned for describing here. Still another got me on a fourteen hour flight across the world, to show me what it is like to sleep, and to wake up in a tent: Something I had never done. Every one of us has special insights and knowledge that only we possess; when we die, it's as if a whole library burns to the ground, reduced to nothing...nothing but ASH. So a full year later, I have that response--"Why am I on Basenotes really?"--Answer: To share, to learn, to distract, and to be distracted. From answer to question go I, fan that I am of Lewis Carroll and reverse-logic: You, who are all now on Basenotes, do you like my new signature?
    Oui.


  33. #33

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Inspired I have added my own signature.
    "Ca sent les pieds!"

  34. #34

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Guys, I like all your new signatures!

  35. #35

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Mouchoir de Monsieur, these boards have certainly been enriched by your writings, I've enjoyed them very much. I'm interested to know though, what were your impressions of sleeping and waking in a tent? Wishing you a speedy recovery!

  36. #36

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Had the distinct pleasure of testing Blenheim Bouquet in Tangs (Big Noodle) recently, definitely top draw and refreshing. Can't afford it though, but it doesn't matter I can read Le Mouchoir, and I do so very appreciatively.

  37. #37

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by le mouchoir de monsieur View Post
    Now, you, I challenge you to apply this kind of self analysis to yourself. If you are earnest in your approach to it, you will have your answer. The fact that "Arpege" was created for women should not factor into your internal discussion.
    I couldn't agree more. I'm a straight woman, and several "masculines" and most unisex fragrances really mesh with my inner being much easier than a lot of the "feminines" - so much so I can't even relate much to the female side of this board. I try to wear "feminines" but its like jamming my feet into someone else's shoes. The way you feel about Jicky, is similar to what I felt like when I tried Amouage Tribute. I was like coming home ... like my inner being found the right lego that fits with it. It smells like ash trays and I don't smoke and I hate cigerettes, yet Tribute just fits me. It's a little bit butch, but its also soothing for the soul.

    My bf can wear all kinds of "feminines" that I can not. He doesn't know anything about fragrance, I just try things on him, and if they work, then they work. So he unknowingly is going about his day all the time wearing big florals yet he smells "right." In fact he goes to his carpenter job wearing plaid shirts and fragrances such as: Carnal Flower, Carillon pour un ange, Honour Woman ... and he just smells fresh and clean after a shower. When I try to wear those, I feel like Tootsie.
    Last edited by firehorse; 26th October 2011 at 07:58 PM.

  38. #38

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Quote Originally Posted by le mouchoir de monsieur View Post
    On Mr. Roja Dove: .
    Thank you for your story, it colored my day.

  39. #39

    Default Re: Thank you Le Mouchoir de Monsieur

    Here we are in another year, another time, and I, myself, find again that I am suffering from yet another case of something, something different, I imagine, though as it pans out I am inexplicably bound in the very same bed. It is embarrassing to admit, embarrassing, that is, to my own self, just how many hours in a day I can spend exploring Basenotes when I am assigned the dreaded "Bed Rest." Recently, I had the pleasure of a kind PM by koalawho tells me that he, too, is down with the confounded bronchite, this loathsome affliction that is a recurrent, unwelcome visitor in my house: The only thing good about her is her "Hostess Gift." My perfume du jour is Codeine. So, bored as I am, I remembered this thread: Currently, I am meant to be piloting my own: Who knew that on BN we could have our own airline? (AIR MDM, Where every flight is a flight of fancy) At any rate, in re-reading it I see that a question was addressed to me, and I, who knows how, neglected to answer it, and it was a juicy one! It went this way: "How did you find the experience of sleeping in a tent?" Ah! Yes. It is true that, upon getting to know a fellow BN contributor on PM, the course of our written discussion brought us very naturally far, far away from perfumes, and seemed to want to focus on life in general. In the midst of these exchanges, it came to light that I had never slept in a tent, nor had ever I gone camping, and that the closest I had come to an experience such as that was getting locked in to Pere Lachaise Cemetery and having to spend the night hiding in one of the many crypts that have been vandalized over the years for fear of crossing paths with the guard dogs, which are trained to attack, that roam the cemetery after hours. So it came to pass that, on a dare, last June, I boarded a fourteen hour flight that took me well across the world, with only a small backpack, and not my usual trunks of clothes and toiletries. Three days after my arrival, I was in a tent, with someone who, for intents and purposes, I had never before met. I think that, of all the things that I have done on a whim, this experience may very well make the list of top ten most magical. So out of my element was I, it felt as if I had not just left my home, left my adopted country, but also left the planet: The most enchanting thing was that, the new one where I landed was so beautiful, and so full of surprises, that, even though while it was happening I was nervous and felt somewhat overwhelmed, looking back on it I must fight back tears as a wave of nostalgia flows right over me, and threatens to take me with it...back to this place where I have to my name only one pair of jeans, and I am wearing them, and not much else: The rest of my earthly possessions turned momentarily into a pillow upon which to rest my head, and my home: My home, previously of stone, is made of nylon, and is luminescent with every shade of light the world will shed in the height of June. It was beautiful. Cathartic: I am, since then, very distinctly not the same person. I remember how, when it began to rain, I and my BN "virtual friend," now real, and in flesh and blood, were inside our tent, which was barely large enough to contain me in all my length, she whispered to me that, "the trick is, to not touch the walls of the tent. If you do that, the water will come through" at which point she took my hand, and brushed it up against the wall of cloth, which caused a tiny thread of water to run down my arm. Every raindrop made a tiny sound that, when heard with all the others, combined with rushes of wind through full blown leaves, was that of a symphony, more beautiful than any I had previously heard. And the mornings! When morning came...each time it brought with it a kind of wonder...and a palpable thankfulness that all my life had previously escaped me: The Morning is a gift most precious. Sunny, wet, grey, cold, every dawn is a promise. Who would ever imagine that having an overblown fancy of perfume could bring about such epiphanies? In short, Ozjon701, it was an unforgettable experience that shall live within me until I die, and perhaps, beyond: I wish the same unto all you readers out there. Someone I had never met sent out an unseemly dare. I took her up on it, and now, in large part thanks to what she showed me, a world I had never seen, everything is different. to all best wishes, le MdM
    "...a Chacun son Mauvais Gout."

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