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  1. #1
    Dependent Akahina's Avatar
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    Question Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    I have not been seriously interested in fragrances until the last couple of years but have done a ton of research and have sampled so many things I can't even count them all. But it seems to me that there are certain trends in the industry, like in any other industry. In the 80s it was "powerhouse" fragrances. Other trends are for aquatic scents, clean sports scents, gourmond "foody" scents and the last few years to scents with oud and scents with a woody note. (I have to admit I love the oud trend.) There are other trends too but I can't list them all.

    I also have to admit that when I go smell designer scents at department stores I get bored really quickly. Yes, most are different from each other but in their differences I find similarities and find myself bored. Even with a lot of the more uncommon or "niche" scents I also find few that interest me. Even though my wardrobe is small compared to most of the fragheads here I feel I am just about done.

    So, I wonder what is coming next as a trend?

    What notes would you like to find or what blends of notes have not been done that you would like to see?

    I anyone else bored with what is coming out now? There are so many releases and so few that challenge the status quo, at least that is how I feel.
    Some Favorites
    1. Amouage Epic man
    2. Dior Leather Oud
    3. Perris Monte Carlo Oud Imperial Black
    4. Le Labo Patchouli 24
    5. Amouage Opus VII
    6. Byredo Bullion
    7. Masque Milano Russian Tea


    Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.
    Currently wearing: Habit Rouge by Guerlain

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    I would like to see a featured note arise into prominence from some of the more exotic plants or fruits found in Brazil that have yet to be utilized by the industry.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Pretty much, the return of trends which were "in" 30-40 years ago, I have often noticed that, just as in fashion, the fragrance industry tries to revive scent fads & trends which were fashionable during the 60s, 70s or 80s and try to make them bankable and appealing to contemporary tastes

  4. #4

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    I agree with Ken, one trend is "what's old is new again".

    I also see a trend in both fragrance and fashion that has Men's styles and smells becoming more classically "feminine".

    -Having chest hair is no longer manly. I remember when women thought a hairy chest was sexy and manly, now it is gross. As a hairy guy, I can only wait with anticipation until the trend swings the other way. It will, because the gay community apparently now has a thing for "bears", so you know the rest of the world will follow eventually.

    -Trend in Men's clothing toward tighter fitting clothes, especially jeans... which now are commonly found with short rise and tighter legs. This is good for me as a short rise fits my body style much better, but I am a cyclist so i can't wear pants with too small of a leg.

    -And Frags... pretty obvious that a lot of Men's frags could be marketed to Women and nobody would take notice.


    Akahina, I was just at Sephora and I agree most designer frags are forgettable. Believe it or not, CK One Shock came off as original and different. I got a sample but haven't wore it yet.

  5. #5
    rickbr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post
    Pretty much, the return of trends which were "in" 30-40 years ago, I have often noticed that, just as in fashion, the fragrance industry tries to revive scent fads & trends which were fashionable during the 60s, 70s or 80s and try to make them bankable and appealing to contemporary tastes
    This would be interesting, but then i guess that a lot of IFRA bans would have to be revised or the industry would have to come with ways of extracting the allergic components without changing the smell.

  6. #6
    rickbr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    I keep wondering about trends, but regarding the commertialxnicheXindie question. At first niche was a trend, and now it seems that it`s going into the direction of the maximum of its exploration, with a lot of new brands and lines being launched every year and also with the commertial creation of exclusive lines to compete with. You see that with this the independent, or indie, brands are starting to become the new, lets say, niche, but i guess that it`s just question of time to they come popular too. But then, what will come after indie? I cannot see exactly why.

    About the exploration of exotic fruits and herbs, i do also want this but at the same time it`s something that worries me. Who knows if they will no become extinct due to unscrupulous exploitation?

    Not regarding notes, but i`d be happy to see if brands started to open a direct communication channel with their clients. If you take something out of production due to low sales why not keep an online option of offering small lots of that product once you achieve the mininum number of clients? It`d be much more respectful with the person who bought it once and now can`t find it anymore...

  7. #7
    StylinLA's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    I was in Sepora yesterday too. Sniffed a few and nothing wowed me. I did get very amused by watching two young women gush over how heavenly La Nuit and 1 Millon smelled on men. (young guys take note). Basenoters should hang at cologne counters and observe "average" frag consumers more...it's fun and it puts a lot of things in perspective. Sephora is an especially good place to lurk because the SAs are usually pretty minimal and people are left to fend for themselves. Easy to strike up a conversations with them and you're not stepping on the toes of an SA pushing a particular product.

    I'd say we're in the heart of the oud trend right now. Not sure what direction will come along next. It operates like anything else in fashion I'd say. Someone launches something jussssst a bit different like M7... and it catches on and gets copied. I don't even know that M7 was overwhelmingly popular, but it looks to me like it sort of set a new direction in motion.

    Haven't really thoroughly studied it, but I'd say the young (18-34) drive the trends for sure. This is true in most businesses, espeically anything fashion related. Advertisers pay a premium to target that age group on the premise they are more easily influenced by advertising, and more willing to try something new and different. They're not entirely wrong.

    Most Basenoters, whatever age, tend to develop an overall appreciation for many kinds of scents. We are not largely indicative of the general frag consuming public. Surfing around in here and reading, we get exposed to scents at a level inconceivable to the average man or woman meandering up and down the aisle at Sephora. Many a young Basenoter has developed an appreciation for "mature" scents, and many a mature guy has developed a like for young "clubber" juice.

    @Dorje - I can't think of a men's scent that women couldn't really wear if she felt like it.

  8. #8
    rickbr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by StylinLA View Post
    I was in Sepora yesterday too. Sniffed a few and nothing wowed me. I did get very amused by watching two young women gush over how heavenly La Nuit and 1 Millon smelled on men. (young guys take note). Basenoters should hang at cologne counters and observe "average" frag consumers more...it's fun and it puts a lot of things in perspective. Sephora is an especially good place to lurk because the SAs are usually pretty minimal and people are left to fend for themselves. Easy to strike up a conversations with them and you're not stepping on the toes of an SA pushing a particular product.

    I'd say we're in the heart of the oud trend right now. Not sure what direction will come along next. It operates like anything else in fashion I'd say. Someone launches something jussssst a bit different like M7... and it catches on and gets copied. I don't even know that M7 was overwhelmingly popular, but it looks to me like it sort of set a new direction in motion.

    Haven't really thoroughly studied it, but I'd say the young (18-34) drive the trends for sure. This is true in most businesses, espeically anything fashion related. Advertisers pay a premium to target that age group on the premise they are more easily influenced by advertising, and more willing to try something new and different. They're not entirely wrong.

    Most Basenoters, whatever age, tend to develop an overall appreciation for many kinds of scents. We are not largely indicative of the general frag consuming public. Surfing around in here and reading, we get exposed to scents at a level inconceivable to the average man or woman meandering up and down the aisle at Sephora. Many a young Basenoter has developed an appreciation for "mature" scents, and many a mature guy has developed a like for young "clubber" juice.

    @Dorje - I can't think of a men's scent that women couldn't really wear if she felt like it.
    You said something that i have already questioned myself, about the targeting of most brands. They only target an specific group, assuming that this is the one that spend more, and they focus in a general way on this group. I see that there is a lack of analytic studies in this case. I see that products would be more sucessfull if analysis were made based on historical information of what each consumer buys (and also based on information of websites like basenotes and fragrantica and makeupalley, where you would have a kind of analysis of how well received was that specific product). This could result, i think, in models that could help to see what other groups may consume also and how to target those groups.

  9. #9
    StylinLA's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    You said something that i have already questioned myself, about the targeting of most brands. They only target an specific group, assuming that this is the one that spend more, and they focus in a general way on this group. I see that there is a lack of analytic studies in this case. I see that products would be more sucessfull if analysis were made based on historical information of what each consumer buys (and also based on information of websites like basenotes and fragrantica and makeupalley, where you would have a kind of analysis of how well received was that specific product). This could result, i think, in models that could help to see what other groups may consume also and how to target those groups.
    Trust me, there ARE studies of it. But they won't share them. There are people at Chanel's marketing division who could fill books with information about this. Notice how they advertise their scents. Have you ever seen a cologne ad with anyone who looked over 30? Every industry studies the shyt out of this stuff. I can't recall ever seeing a fragrance ad with anyone close to my age represented. Ever. And if they did ever do an ad with a guy my age, people under 30 would avoid that scent like the plague. Truth is, so would most people under 60... I'd probably run too. Once you cross 30 or so, the appeal of youth starts to magnify.

    I don't hate Bleu de Chanel, but let's face, it's pretty safe. It's different enough, but not so different from a lot current offerings that they don't have to worry they can't sell it. No one at Chanel is going to push through a scent like Puredistance M because some young boys and girls at cologne counters are going say "ewwww, ewwww, smells like my dad would wear it." if young people reject a designer offering, its DOA. And lots of people get fired as a result of putting out something very different than other contemporary designer scents.

    But every so often, someone does strike out in a new direction and it works, and new trend is underway.

    One of the great things about niche scents is they can often just go nuts for the most part.

    I'd bet the frag people all drink in and peruse Basenotes, but we're not a very good group to use to set a direction. Once you've got over about 5 scents in your wardrobe or over a couple of hundred posts, you are so NOT typical of the average scent consumer.

    I look back at my pre-Internet and/or Basenotes days, and it was so at the whim of what the Macy's SA was pushing as new and different whenever a frag ran out.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Akahina View Post
    I have not been seriously interested in fragrances until the last couple of years but have done a ton of research and have sampled so many things I can't even count them all. But it seems to me that there are certain trends in the industry, like in any other industry. In the 80s it was "powerhouse" fragrances. Other trends are for aquatic scents, clean sports scents, gourmond "foody" scents and the last few years to scents with oud and scents with a woody note. (I have to admit I love the oud trend.) There are other trends too but I can't list them all.

    I also have to admit that when I go smell designer scents at department stores I get bored really quickly. Yes, most are different from each other but in their differences I find similarities and find myself bored. Even with a lot of the more uncommon or "niche" scents I also find few that interest me. Even though my wardrobe is small compared to most of the fragheads here I feel I am just about done.

    So, I wonder what is coming next as a trend?

    What notes would you like to find or what blends of notes have not been done that you would like to see?

    I anyone else bored with what is coming out now? There are so many releases and so few that challenge the status quo, at least that is how I feel.
    If I had a bunch of Bond, YSL and Montale in my collection I'd be bored too

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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    my crystal ball is malfunctioning today ... but, I certainly hope there is a return to the heyday of mens fragrances ... a time when the whiff of a scent enabled a blindfolded person to determine who had just walked into a room ...


  12. #12

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    If the average mainstream consumer is at the mercy of a Macys or Sephora SA, then maybe we should step in and try to demystify the fragrance world for them. Since I've started my fragrance journey, I've written two articles for OMG magazine, brief descriptions of a few chosen fragrances and have received incredible feedback on them. Being in Nashville, there isn't much exposure/availability until Nordstroms opened a few months ago - there was only two small boutiques that had Creed / Bond and very little niche around - so people didn't know about them. Fast forward to last weekend, and I smelled a 22 year old boy wearing Silver Mountain Water and another youngster wearing Original Santal. I complimented both of them on it and they were gushing. The one wearing Original Santal said it was a sample but he had received so many compliments on it that he was planning to buy it. I suggested that before he buy it - that he should sample it against CK One Shock as they are similar.

    Where I am going with this - is that I am planning to launch a blog in early 2012 with just the same focus - taking on a fragrance every weekday and describing it in easy to understand terminology - top notes / mid notes / base notes - when to wear it - how long it might last - office friendly - etc. The target is not necessarily us perfumistas/cologneisseurs but joe average who might not have seen anything but the designer world. It will be very similar to what I do on dancemusic.about.com with Song of the Day.. where I introduce a new song every day. SOTD - works for both song and scent

    As for fashion trends being aimed at youngsters.. it surprises me that the fragrance world hasn't more directly (or successfully) targeted the hipster kids. The generation that wears the skin tight black jeans that look like leggings and drink PBR. I could see either a repackaged classic powerhouse (for authenticity) or a new skank/sweat scent being successfully marketed. I think this is what Lush is trying to do with the Dirty line.

    I am also surprised that the fragrance world hasn't gone after the DJ superstars for signature scents/endorsements (if they have, I must have missed it.) Aside from the Ting Tings pimping Tommy Hilfiger Loud, I haven't seen any other electronic acts working with frags. Although he would never sell out like this, I would love to smell what a deadmau5 frag would be. I could imagine the next Armin van Buuren international tour being sponsored by a new Diesel fragrance.

    If you don't know who Armin Van Buuren / deadmau5 are.. don't worry about it.. most Joe Average people don't know Bond / Creed / civet <grin>

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by djron91 View Post
    If you don't know who Armin Van Buuren / deadmau5 are.. don't worry about it.. most Joe Average people don't know Bond / Creed / civet <grin>
    why would people be concerned with failed musicians?

    disagree with Original Santal and CK Shock smelling alike







    untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz

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  14. #14

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    @PuddleMonkey Not sure why you would refer to Armin van Buuren and deadmau5 as failed musicians.. one does the most massive international tours and the other is the biggest selling Beatport artist. If you don't like those as references, then how about David Guetta and Avicii (Tim Berg)..

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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by djron91 View Post
    @PuddleMonkey Not sure why you would refer to Armin van Buuren and deadmau5 as failed musicians.. one does the most massive international tours and the other is the biggest selling Beatport artist. If you don't like those as references, then how about David Guetta and Avicii (Tim Berg)..
    I'm just prodding you ronny, don't take it to heart.


    I have a good friend into dance/trace/whatever it's called, I love to give him sh!t because all I hear is, "untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz untz" while some guy turns knobs.

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  16. #16
    rickbr's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by StylinLA View Post
    Trust me, there ARE studies of it. But they won't share them. There are people at Chanel's marketing division who could fill books with information about this. Notice how they advertise their scents. Have you ever seen a cologne ad with anyone who looked over 30? Every industry studies the shyt out of this stuff. I can't recall ever seeing a fragrance ad with anyone close to my age represented. Ever. And if they did ever do an ad with a guy my age, people under 30 would avoid that scent like the plague. Truth is, so would most people under 60... I'd probably run too. Once you cross 30 or so, the appeal of youth starts to magnify.

    I don't hate Bleu de Chanel, but let's face, it's pretty safe. It's different enough, but not so different from a lot current offerings that they don't have to worry they can't sell it. No one at Chanel is going to push through a scent like Puredistance M because some young boys and girls at cologne counters are going say "ewwww, ewwww, smells like my dad would wear it." if young people reject a designer offering, its DOA. And lots of people get fired as a result of putting out something very different than other contemporary designer scents.

    But every so often, someone does strike out in a new direction and it works, and new trend is underway.

    One of the great things about niche scents is they can often just go nuts for the most part.

    I'd bet the frag people all drink in and peruse Basenotes, but we're not a very good group to use to set a direction. Once you've got over about 5 scents in your wardrobe or over a couple of hundred posts, you are so NOT typical of the average scent consumer.

    I look back at my pre-Internet and/or Basenotes days, and it was so at the whim of what the Macy's SA was pushing as new and different whenever a frag ran out.
    I agree with what you said, but it wasn't that what i was trying to say. I'm talking about planning of future launches and the best way of achieving the target that have the highest chance of consuming it. I mean that brands are loosing the focus of fragrance aficcionados, that usuall y spend a lot, and that they could study them, see their wants and needs and the best way to produce things that really impress these target. And i believe that a good data model would help to achieve this (also a good perfumer and good materials!).

    The heavy focus on young don't make sense to me at the point of how much they can spent. I cannot say that a part of this group cannot spend good amounts on a perfume, but it's less likely that they will do this.

    About the go nuts on niche scents, i have the impression that the more they gain focus the less they go into that direction =/

  17. #17

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    I have no idea what it might be, but personally I would hope for something new entirely, which wouldn't have all the problems with IFRA regulations and/or scarcity of ingredients leading to cheaper reformulations which a lot of current and vintage frags have. I suppose this might involve some whole new batch of aromachemicals. Not that I'd like to see natural ingredients go completely by the wayside.
    Click to view my swap thread (L'Occitane and Tam Dao products going):

    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/277...mp-body-lotion

  18. #18

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post
    Pretty much, the return of trends which were "in" 30-40 years ago, I have often noticed that, just as in fashion, the fragrance industry tries to revive scent fads & trends which were fashionable during the 60s, 70s or 80s and try to make them bankable and appealing to contemporary tastes
    I agree with Ken on this.

    What was once considered old and tired becomes new again. "Vintage" becomes hip.

    I am reminded of "Laver's Law," a theory on fashion, and how old and tired becomes beautiful 150 years after its time. What was worn 150 years ago is considered elegant and refined, whereas something from the 1980s is so--well, 1980s.

    Quote Originally Posted by djron91 View Post
    If the ave most Joe Average people don't know Bond / Creed / civet <grin>
    Some people only know Bond and Creed, sadly.
    "No elegance is possible without it...perfume is a part of you." Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel

  19. #19

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    One of the unexpected delights of getting old(er) is the gradual realization that, incontinence supplies and ambulatory vehicles aside, one is no longer situated smack dab in the middle of any target demographic for most consumer marketing. For me, this is a great relief. As a pre-senior, I find I can now judge products like clothing and fragrances entirely on the basis of their real merits without the pressure of having my ego stroked into blind brand loyalty. I know for certain that none of the big fragrance brands could give a rats ass about my age group and that's perfectly OK with me.

    I would be horrified if any fragrance brand created a scent marketed at my age demographic. Not because I am uncomfortable with growing older (I'm not, at least not any more than expected) or that I identify with the youth (not by a long shot.). I'd be horrified because I have grown used to the freedom that comes with being ignored by mass marketers and would not willingly ever give up that freedom.

    The trend I would love to see doesn't involve any particular notes. It would be towards greater scent personalization; unique fragrances custom-built for each individual. It would be expensive but I think it could catch on. Then again, what does an old geezer know about anything?


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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Duplicate post
    Last edited by Primrose; 21st November 2011 at 03:01 AM.
    "No elegance is possible without it...perfume is a part of you." Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel

  21. #21

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Griff View Post
    One of the unexpected delights of getting old(er) is the gradual realization that, incontinence supplies and ambulatory vehicles aside, one is no longer situated smack dab in the middle of any target demographic for most consumer marketing. For me, this is a great relief. As a pre-senior, I find I can now judge products like clothing and fragrances entirely on the basis of their real merits without the pressure of having my ego stroked into blind brand loyalty. I know for certain that none of the big fragrance brands could give a rats ass about my age group and that's perfectly OK with me.

    I would be horrified if any fragrance brand created a scent marketed at my age demographic. Not because I am uncomfortable with growing older (I'm not, at least not any more than expected) or that I identify with the youth (not by a long shot.). I'd be horrified because I have grown used to the freedom that comes with being ignored by mass marketers and would not willingly ever give up that freedom.

    The trend I would love to see doesn't involve any particular notes. It would be towards greater scent personalization; unique fragrances custom-built for each individual. It would be expensive but I think it could catch on. Then again, what does an old geezer know about anything?

    ;-)
    Good observation, Griff. If one has a mind of his own, you choose what you like by merit, not by advertising or what is popular and trendy. I could not care less who wears a scent or who is fronting it. I go by my nose alone.
    "No elegance is possible without it...perfume is a part of you." Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    I would like to see more fragrances for people who like fragrances.
    Please feel free to check out my Swap Thread - Patou pour Homme, L'Instant de Guerlain PH Extreme, Dior Homme Intense, Pure Malt, Pure Coffee and many more! Click Here For My Swap Thread

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    The heavy focus on young don't make sense to me at the point of how much they can spent. I cannot say that a part of this group cannot spend good amounts on a perfume, but it's less likely that they will do this.

    About the go nuts on niche scents, i have the impression that the more they gain focus the less they go into that direction =/
    Yes, one of the ironies of the advertisers IS that the people they target have less money to spend indeed.

    I agree, once a niche company becomes more popular, they will likely become more conservative.

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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Griff View Post
    I would be horrified if any fragrance brand created a scent marketed at my age demographic. Not because I am uncomfortable with growing older (I'm not, at least not any more than expected) or that I identify with the youth (not by a long shot.). I'd be horrified because I have grown used to the freedom that comes with being ignored by mass marketers and would not willingly ever give up that freedom.
    I agree, but therein lies the reason they don't want to target us. It's interesting to look at and consider.

    Witness the Pure Malt hysteria. I'd venture a guess no one over about 35 is going bat shyt crazy trying to find it. If I put my bottle of Pure Malt in the BST, I'd have fifty PMs in a day.

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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Griff View Post
    One of the unexpected delights of getting old(er) is the gradual realization that, incontinence supplies and ambulatory vehicles aside, one is no longer situated smack dab in the middle of any target demographic for most consumer marketing. For me, this is a great relief. As a pre-senior, I find I can now judge products like clothing and fragrances entirely on the basis of their real merits without the pressure of having my ego stroked into blind brand loyalty. I know for certain that none of the big fragrance brands could give a rats ass about my age group and that's perfectly OK with me.

    I would be horrified if any fragrance brand created a scent marketed at my age demographic. Not because I am uncomfortable with growing older (I'm not, at least not any more than expected) or that I identify with the youth (not by a long shot.). I'd be horrified because I have grown used to the freedom that comes with being ignored by mass marketers and would not willingly ever give up that freedom.

    The trend I would love to see doesn't involve any particular notes. It would be towards greater scent personalization; unique fragrances custom-built for each individual. It would be expensive but I think it could catch on. Then again, what does an old geezer know about anything?


    ;-)
    I suspect that the personalization trend will become popular at some time - but i believe that it will be in a kind of cheapened way, with consumer picking pre-chosen notes at a virtual or real store and with someone doing a mixture already recorded somewhere, with a product being sold as unique and special =/

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    StylinLA's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    I suspect that the personalization trend will become popular at some time - but i believe that it will be in a kind of cheapened way, with consumer picking pre-chosen notes at a virtual or real store and with someone doing a mixture already recorded somewhere, with a product being sold as unique and special =/
    I could definitely see it. I don't know enough about fragrance production to know what the obstacles are at present, but I think it will happer at some point. I could see a retailer like Barney's diving into something like that.

    I do agree that someone on the cheap mass production side will probably be first to try it.

    I think Basenoter types would embrace it. But I could see a lot of average consumers a bit afraid and insecure of their own tastes. There is a level of safety using something that others buy even with something as personal as scent. We take our knowledge of notes for granted here. Joe Average often just knows he likes "citrus." I wish I had a nickel for every non frag head guy I know who just wants smell like citrus all day long.

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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by StylinLA View Post
    I could definitely see it. I don't know enough about fragrance production to know what the obstacles are at present, but I think it will happer at some point. I could see a retailer like Barney's diving into something like that.

    I do agree that someone on the cheap mass production side will probably be first to try it.

    I think Basenoter types would embrace it. But I could see a lot of average consumers a bit afraid and insecure of their own tastes. There is a level of safety using something that others buy even with something as personal as scent. We take our knowledge of notes for granted here. Joe Average often just knows he likes "citrus." I wish I had a nickel for every non frag head guy I know who just wants smell like citrus all day long.
    Too bad that really smelling like citrus all day long is something really hard to achieve!
    Maybe they will do this in a sort of Subway way? Like, they produce some bases that blend well each other and what you do is pick the ones you want and at a ratio suggested by a trained sales person? It seems possible, but then i think we'll have to wait and see what the industry will do

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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    classical orientals like Opium, Coco, Cinnebar, should make a comeback in the foreseeable future.
    Last edited by socalwoman; 22nd November 2011 at 03:27 PM.

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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    I'd like to see perfumers have the freedom to do whatever they wanted to do, but this is also interesting:

    "7/10 The Last Duftnote

    This, friends, will be my last Duftnote. Actors want to direct, artists want to run the Ministry
    of Culture, dancers want to be choreographers, and I want to write about something other
    than smell. But before I go, I give you the Duftnote of 2030:

    IFRA is over. Now that we can stimulate olfactory cells directly with light, there’s no need
    for chemicals. At least, there hasn't been since 2013, when a group at the Media Lab
    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, my current place of work) successfully replicated a
    convincing smell of bacon by shining light pulses at three different wavelengths.

    Three years later the technology was sufficiently advanced that perfumers were fooled about
    whether they were smelling rose oil or light. MIT Chemistry students were among the first to
    use the technology to identify and remember molecules by associating them with tunes. My
    son at age 10 smelled wintergreen in a cough drop and said, “Smoke and mint.” When he
    and his musically-minded sister arrived at MIT, they soon figured out the smoke and mint
    chords and learned to play them at different speeds—it turns out arpeggiato is best—until
    they got wintergreen.

    In 2019 at age 20 my son finished a degree in Optogenetic Engineering, while his sister’s
    third-year assignment at Juilliard was a 3-minute smell piece in which she starts out with a
    huge cluster chord that smells like wet dog and and one by one removes all the bad notes,
    ending with Jicky played pianissimo.

    To smell a perfume these days, all you do is spray a solution containing about 200 different
    harmless viruses up your nose. Each virus infects a different type of olfactory receptor and
    instructs it to make a particular protein, which pumps electric charge across the membrane
    when exposed to light of a particular color. After about 18 to 24 hours, the proteins are in
    place.

    You insert a small fiber optic into your nostril. It is connected to a small machine containing
    a dozen tunable lasers, which in turn is connected to your laptop and can read a variety of
    formats like .olf, .noz and .mp7. (Not familiar with them? You haven’t been paying
    attention.)

    I bought one of the early prototype machines and spent several months just going up and
    down the scale of molecular vibrations and endlessly playing Vince Guaraldi’s “Cast Your
    Fate to the Wind” (the second chord smells of lavender soap) on an iPad MIDI keyboard.
    That was a while ago. Now of course ITunes has a smellable books section, and you can visit
    the Osmothèque remotely.

    But the best things are completely new: the strange, stately harmonies of smell are now explored by a generation of “nazers,” a movement started in Paris around 2020 that soon took over the world. You are all familiar with their work, no need to go into it. I knew they were onto something when I smelled a piece by Calice Becker’s granddaughter that went from bread to nail varnish to curry in the opening bar. I am smelling her second album as I write." -- Luca Turin

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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    ...
    Last edited by Guest05; 10th March 2012 at 04:37 AM.

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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by hednic View Post
    I would like to see a featured note arise into prominence from some of the more exotic plants or fruits found in Brazil that have yet to be utilized by the industry.
    I agree wholeheartedly! From Brazil and elsewhere too. I wonder about a fragrance that includes the smell of durian......in small doses.
    Some Favorites
    1. Amouage Epic man
    2. Dior Leather Oud
    3. Perris Monte Carlo Oud Imperial Black
    4. Le Labo Patchouli 24
    5. Amouage Opus VII
    6. Byredo Bullion
    7. Masque Milano Russian Tea


    Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.
    Currently wearing: Habit Rouge by Guerlain

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    Basenotes Junkie CX827's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Akahina View Post
    I agree wholeheartedly! From Brazil and elsewhere too. I wonder about a fragrance that includes the smell of durian......in small doses.
    ^leaking gas maybe?

    And to your question Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    It would be nice to see perfumers start their own line cos it's time for them to shine.

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    Dependent Akahina's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by petruccijc View Post
    I would like to see more fragrances for people who like fragrances.
    Wouldn't that be nice? Perhaps the idea of personalization is a good one, in fact I think it is a good idea. It does seem that fragrances are designed to be safe and to appeal to those that wear their fragrances like a pair socks. Something you put on and that nobody really notices because it comes across as "typical" for lack of a better term.
    Some Favorites
    1. Amouage Epic man
    2. Dior Leather Oud
    3. Perris Monte Carlo Oud Imperial Black
    4. Le Labo Patchouli 24
    5. Amouage Opus VII
    6. Byredo Bullion
    7. Masque Milano Russian Tea


    Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.
    Currently wearing: Habit Rouge by Guerlain

  34. #34

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by Akahina View Post
    Wouldn't that be nice? Perhaps the idea of personalization is a good one, in fact I think it is a good idea. It does seem that fragrances are designed to be safe and to appeal to those that wear their fragrances like a pair socks. Something you put on and that nobody really notices because it comes across as "typical" for lack of a better term.
    Good point, Akahina. Some people dress to blend in and others dress to express a statement. Fragrance fans like us are people who like fragrances.

    Who was the celebrity who launched a signature scent as a "non" perfume. That left me scratching my head. What about perfume for people who hate perfume?
    "No elegance is possible without it...perfume is a part of you." Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel

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    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by CX827 View Post
    ^leaking gas maybe?

    And to your question Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    It would be nice to see perfumers start their own line cos it's time for them to shine.
    But it has to be some well planned. See the case of Mark Buxton line. Launched some years ago, it`s now disappearing from the stores. The perfumes were nice, but didn`t add anything exciting that could stand them from the others.

    If more perfumers start to launch lines of several fragrances that don`t add nothing new, it will be just more products to disappear from the shelves on the next years...

  36. #36

    Default Re: Fragrance fashion, threds and the future. What's next?

    Quote Originally Posted by StylinLA View Post
    Trust me, there ARE studies of it. But they won't share them. There are people at Chanel's marketing division who could fill books with information about this. Notice how they advertise their scents. Have you ever seen a cologne ad with anyone who looked over 30? Every industry studies the shyt out of this stuff. I can't recall ever seeing a fragrance ad with anyone close to my age represented. Ever. And if they did ever do an ad with a guy my age, people under 30 would avoid that scent like the plague. Truth is, so would most people under 60... I'd probably run too. Once you cross 30 or so, the appeal of youth starts to magnify..
    What about Clive Owen for Bvlgari Man? Doesn't seem to have hurt the sales of that one much.
    ***For sale:

    Iris Pallida 50ml

    Ungaro I 75ml

    and more!
    - http://www.basenotes.net/threads/301...n-Man-and-more

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