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  1. #1

    Question Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    I am just starting out and have been using perfumerís alcohol with distilled water as the base for my body sprays and perfumes. I have been using a recipe I found online where I start the process with 5 tablespoons of the perfumerís alcohol and the oils and let that sit for at least two days. After that, I add the distilled water and let that sit for at least two weeks. Even after several weeks, I find that oils are not blending with the alcohol and water as expected and remain separated forcing me to shake the body sprays before using. This leads me to believe that I am doing something wrong. Can anyone tell me what I might be doing wrong?

    Also, I would prefer to make my body sprays without alcohol but the only information I have found suggests using a carrier oil as a base, such as Jojoba oil but I always wonder if when spraying that on clothing, won't the oil stain clothing?

    One of my favorite perfumers Christopher Brosius does not use alcohol in his perfumes. I would like to omit alcohol from my recipes as well but I cannot figure out how to make body sprays or perfumes that blend with using just water and a carrier oil which also leads me to believe that I am doing something wrong. I have purchased Christopher's perfumes many times and the oils and water are blended perfectly - how can I get my products to do the same?

    Thank you for any suggestions!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    One more thing to note - I would like to hear what bases experienced perfumers are using for body sprays and perfumes and what the curring process entails as the ones I have tried just aren't working. I have done lots of research online but have found that there are a ton of varying methods for making perfume and body spray and have not quite found what works well yet.

    Thanks again.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Adding water to the mixture is an advanced step that I would avoid for now if I were you.

    Oil based bases are a ridiculous, completely ridiculous idea that spread only because it was hard to buy everclear due to alcohol laws. As evidence I point to the fact that no commercial perfume company uses it. They all use alcohol based bases.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Thanks Cerel!

    The perfumer's alcohol I have been using is SDA 40b but I have been blending that with water which is where the problems coming in. Should I omit the water completely and just use 100% of the alcohol? I was adding water because it was listed in the recipes I was following in addition to helping to get rid of the overpowering smell of alcohol but it doesn't seem to blend no matter what I do.

    I was interested in trying to omit alcohol completely since I know other perfumers have had success with using other ingredients as a base.

    I refer to Christopher Brosius' website often since I am a fan of his perfumes. Here is what he has on his site in regard to the base for his perfume:

    "The Ingredients in all CB Water Perfumes & CB HOME Sprays are: Distilled Water, Fragrance, PPG-26 Buteth-26, PEG-40 and Hydrogenated Castor Oil. No specially denatured alcohol is used in ANY CB Perfume."

    In addition, he says the following about the use of alcohol in his perfumes:

    "I have never been happy with specially denatured alcohol as a base for fragrance; it evaporates quickly, dries the skin & hair and is highly flammable. Oil & water are what the skin naturally needs to hold fragrance the longest – I use those as the bases for all my perfumes instead. From an esthetic view, alcohol always interferes with the true nature of the scent and you need to wait for it to “burn off” before you can truly appreciate perfume. Without alcohol, my scents are presented immediately exactly as I designed them."

    (http://www.cbihateperfume.com/about-perfume.html)

    There is so much conflicting information on the Internet about what to use. This is why I am interested to hear what others have used and what has worked for you.

    Thank you!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    The problem with water is that, (a) sometimes none of the other ingredients will mix with it or even worse, (b) sometimes an ingredient that had mixed into your other ingredients will be more attracted to the water. So it will separate from the other ingredients and latch on to the water.

    It's possible to mix water with your fragrance, but it's hard and not worth the hassle it in my opinion.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Hi there

    You might be interested in this article by perfumer Alec Lawless - he describes at the end the process of adding water to the blend. There is a very tight tipping point on when the fragrance goes cloudy through too much water...

    http://www.essentially-me.co.uk/about_blending.php

    Best regards
    Sian
    Sian at Essentially Me

    http://www.essentially-me.co.uk
    http://aleclawless.blogspot.om

  7. #7

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Do a search of the DIY forum. Mr. Bartlett has previously posted info about chemicals to blend your oils with to make them more water-soluble. The main problem here is that just as with any oil, your essential oils are not water soluble in their natural state.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    oil will not blend with water ever. You have to omit the water.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Quote Originally Posted by oui oui View Post
    oil will not blend with water ever. You have to omit the water.
    I'm afraid that isn't quite true, though it is certainly the case that oils and water will not mix without some help. There are some solubilisers / emulsifiers that you can use. The ingredients list quoted above from Christopher Brosius includes several good ones. Here are my notes from an earlier question on two that are more easily available to the amateur perfumer:

    DPM (dipropylene glyco mono methyl ether) which will enable more oils to dissolve properly in your water / alcohol mix but unfortunately it will also alter the smell (it smells slightly metallic). You need to use about double the volume of DPM that you have of oil and limit your mixture to about 5% aromatic ingredients.

    Polysorbate 20 - that is odourless but what you end up with will be slightly soapy and more like a traditional room spray than a perfume. This works well for low-concentrations - 1-3% aromatics with about the same of P-20 - at higher concentrations you'll struggle to get a sprayable mixture.

    If you go this route you'll also need to consider using a preservative since oil/water mixes are very attractive to bacteria. The good news is that some of the oils you are using for their scent have some preservative effect too, but even so if you have a cloudy liquid it is likely to attract unwanted growth and is best used up within a few weeks. If the liquid is clear it should keep for a year or so quite safely - more if you add preservatives.

    Ethanol is a great preservative as well as a very effective solvent that works with many polar and non-polar constituents - there is a very good reason why 99% of the perfume sold in the world is made with an alcohol base.

    The final alternative is to stop using alcohol or water at all and instead make an oil based perfume, diluting it with DPG, fractionated coconut oil or cyclomethicone: only the last of these will yield a perfume you can spray and even then it's not as good as an ethanol based one. Note that I'm not suggesting jojoba which goes rancid too quickly - it's widely used in the aromatherapy market, I think, because it is nice to rub into the skin in massage. But it is not suitable for making perfume despite the large number of articles on the net that suggest otherwise.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    It's a total matter of preference. Mr Brosius's perfumes are a complete delight with no alcohol at all. Criticism has been levelled at their longevity, but he is addressing that. I like working with oils as I think they are more gentle on the skin and hold their scent nearer to the body. I like to work with oils (mainly fractionated coconut) for creative perfume brewing because you can wear a brew quickly to see if you like it instead of waiting so long. There are also many people who are not allowed to wear alcohols or find they have a drying effect. Ethanol is chosen for it's above qualities, its antibacterial qualities and also because of it's ability to project the scent more upon evaporation. (I'm actually genuinely surprised alcohol based perfumes are as high as 99% of the global market with so many countries using oils.)

    What do you like? What do you have? Learn and work with that first, then add the other methods. There is just too much to learn all at once otherwise.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    I'm afraid that isn't quite true, though it is certainly the case that oils and water will not mix without some help. There are some solubilisers / emulsifiers that you can use. The ingredients list quoted above from Christopher Brosius includes several good ones. Here are my notes from an earlier question on two that are more easily available to the amateur perfumer:

    DPM (dipropylene glyco mono methyl ether) which will enable more oils to dissolve properly in your water / alcohol mix but unfortunately it will also alter the smell (it smells slightly metallic). You need to use about double the volume of DPM that you have of oil and limit your mixture to about 5% aromatic ingredients.

    Polysorbate 20 - that is odourless but what you end up with will be slightly soapy and more like a traditional room spray than a perfume. This works well for low-concentrations - 1-3% aromatics with about the same of P-20 - at higher concentrations you'll struggle to get a sprayable mixture.

    If you go this route you'll also need to consider using a preservative since oil/water mixes are very attractive to bacteria. The good news is that some of the oils you are using for their scent have some preservative effect too, but even so if you have a cloudy liquid it is likely to attract unwanted growth and is best used up within a few weeks. If the liquid is clear it should keep for a year or so quite safely - more if you add preservatives.

    Ethanol is a great preservative as well as a very effective solvent that works with many polar and non-polar constituents - there is a very good reason why 99% of the perfume sold in the world is made with an alcohol base.

    The final alternative is to stop using alcohol or water at all and instead make an oil based perfume, diluting it with DPG, fractionated coconut oil or cyclomethicone: only the last of these will yield a perfume you can spray and even then it's not as good as an ethanol based one. Note that I'm not suggesting jojoba which goes rancid too quickly - it's widely used in the aromatherapy market, I think, because it is nice to rub into the skin in massage. But it is not suitable for making perfume despite the large number of articles on the net that suggest otherwise.
    Thats why it wont blend, it alters the fragrance too much, when you have to go to great links to blend its just better to omit the water

  12. #12

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Quote Originally Posted by mumsy View Post
    I like to work with oils (mainly fractionated coconut) for creative perfume brewing because you can wear a brew quickly to see if you like it instead of waiting so long.
    What a great idea mumsy! I've been dabbling in blending lately, and I've only just has my first alcohol blend mature past 4 weeks, and it is very different than it was at 1 week, that's for sure. I've read 4 - 6 weeks is a good amount of time with alcohol - how long would you recommend letting the oils mascerate in a carrier oil before use?

  13. #13

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    I do still leave all blends to mature, and the scent changes with the oil after time in the same way that it does in alcohol. I have made many a blend and filed it thinking it didn't work, then revisited it much later with a view to chucking it and it smelled fabulous.

    I keep a small bottle of each of my EO's and abs diluted in both FC and in ethanol at a 10% dilution just for messing with, so both versions have been pre-diluted for ages now. For me, a 20% extrait makes my nose tired too quickly and swamps the gentle notes. I keep my really powerful ingredients at each dilution of 10%, 5% and 1%, and sometimes at 0.1% for the real overbearing ones.

    It's just my own preference, but it could be because I came from the aromatherapy end of the scale, that I am most comfortable with oils. Whilst creating a blend using oil, I think I get a good feel of how the mix is progressing without sniffing alcohol fumes. I also have very little problem with solubility, One ginger and a costus root were clouders but most others have been fine. The other thing to bear in mind is that I am only working with a natural palette and an oil base may not work with aromachemicals. I have no idea but I expect we shall get informed before I misguide you.

    It's only a personal thing, but I find oil easier for playing with than alcohol because I can make a 'rough sketch' of an idea still using dropper tops instead of weighing. The oil doesn't come out too fast, nor do I have to mess with pipettes at that rough stage. I always make written records of what I have done and whose make of ingredient I used and I keep these notes with the sample. When I like a rough blend enough, or feel I am in the right direction, then I do it again, but weigh properly and tweak using a scale. If I really like a blend, or I am specifically designing a perfume for someone, then I will make an alcohol version too. This also needs further tweaking to suit the substrate as some ingredients shout louder in alcohol. I do like to work up both versions when I have a nice formula, as I would like my customers to have the choice, and I learn what happens after time with both.

    I'm still learning myself, so I will stand corrected if someone who knows exactly what they are doing thinks this is a terrible way to go about creating a blend but please tell me why if you do.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    It's a great way to go about it if it works for you . . . there isn't a wrong way, only one that does not yield the results you want [well I guess it would be a wrong way if it was hazardous but you know what I mean]

    As to solubility I find most things will happily dissolve in both ethanol and DPG, a few aroma chemicals will need help to dissolve in DPG though. I've not tried working entirely in Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride (also called fractionated coconut oil, though my chemistry pedant friends tell me that isn't technically accurate). The main area where I most often have trouble with solubility isn't with aroma chemicals though it's with some absolutes and many CO2 extracts: some of which work better in an oil base.

    I've recently been experimenting with a new CO2 extract of cassia bark, which does not dissolve in ethanol, DPG, isopropyl myristate or water but which almost completely dissolves in DPM (di-propylene glycol mono methyl ether) - not very helpful as that damages the scent . . . I'm still working on that problem.

    What I find by far the most helpful trick for getting things into solution reliably though is an automatic stirrer: many solid aroma chemicals, most resins and absolutes take ages to dissolve but will get there in the end if constantly agitated.

    As to the suggested impossibility of making a perfume with water, I think I'll leave the success of Christopher Brosius's range to speak for itself on that one!

    A final thought: you don't necessarily have to get an ingredient to dissolve in anything to make a perfume out of it. I'm just beginning to investigate and learn about making solid perfumes - I'm a long way from competence in that though so I'm not in a position to offer useful advice.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Thank you all so very much for your help! This was the first chance I have gotten to reply, I greatly appreciate all of the advice and tips.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    I've been finding if an abs or CO2 extract doesn't want to play in ethanol, then dissolve it in a small amount of the oil (I use FC), then add the ethanol, agitate regularly and leave for a goodly while. Any parts not wishing to play the game will separate, usually sink and the ethanol is then fragrant and can be taken off. A sonic jewellery cleaner is good for agitation of tinctures and blends. I haven't tested any difference in aroma by the using of it.

    I did read about a tip from a woman on how to remember to shake a new blend of sloe gin regularly, she says she leaves it in a blanket in the boot of her car, so it gets agitated every time she goes anywhere. I haven't tried this with a perfume that needs agitation, but it's a thought.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    One more question if I may - is it common to use just perfumer's alcohol for perfumes (in addition to the essential oils)?

    If using ethanol, is it straight ethanol and essential oil?

  18. #18

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Yes. If the essential oil is pure, you can dilute it in 95% ethanol, preferably with nothing else in it but water. Dilutions of 10% are typical. Some oils that are very strong such as patchouli or oak moss can probably be diluted as low as 1% and some that are weaker can be 20%.

    There's a really good sticky thread about alcohol (above) called A question regarding the use of isopropyl myristate in perfumers alcohol. It will answer a lot of questions about alcohol for you, if you read the whole thing.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Great, I will take a look - thanks again!

  20. #20

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    I have another question - sorry but I am finding some of the information I have read confusing. In another thread in the forum it says that you cannot purchase 95% ethanol in the US and yet I find it readily available in home improvement stores such as this: http://www.lowes.com/pd_276044-34228...hol&facetInfo=

    Is this the same product as what is suggested to make perfume with or is this not suitable for the purpose of making perfume? I have read in various other forums that this can be used for making perfume but again, I am cautious. The last thing I want is making a perfume that burns your skin off, lol.

    The perfumer’s alcohol I have been using is labeled as SDA 40b alcohol which according to MSDS sheets is denatured alcohol, 99% ethanol with bitrex added. However, it is fairly expensive and the quantity you can purchase is limited before you need to apply for a permit.

    I have been doing a lot of research on this topic but it seems there is a ton of conflicting information out there. Thanks again.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Repogirl: It's impossible to tell from the Lowe's website what is actually in the can of "Denatured Alcohol" shown. Part of the confusion and conflicting information you are experiencing arises from the nature of liquor laws in the United States. There are different rules for every state. In some states it's very easy to get good perfumer's alcohol. In others it's totally impossible. Some day we should start a list of all the states in the USA explaining the best way to get proper perfumer's alcohol in each state.

    I would not buy the Lowe's product unless you can find a list of ingredients on the container that includes the words "95% Ethanol". The words "95% Natural Content" are meaningless.

    When Ethanol is treated with denaturing agents, it can often acquire a smell. This happens if one of the denaturing ingredients is camphor, for instance. The best way to check for this, even before you buy it, is to do a simple experiment. Ask a sales person to put a drop of the alcohol on a bit of paper. Wait a minute for the alcohol to evaporate and then smell the paper. If you can't smell anything, it's probably going to be OK for making perfume.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Great tips, thank you!

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    If I may, I'd like to interject a question here. I'm new to the world of perfumery and to basenotes. So, recently just got started making some fragrance compositions and I came across a dilution problem. The dilatant I am using is PerfumersWorld's carrier called Zolvent. It is a non-alcoholic base and to my knowledge no water in it, but perhaps some EO's in there.. I find it kind of oily/slimy/silky and I'm not sure I like it. I'm out of it anyway and looking in to either perfumers alcohol or DPG. I am using aroma chemical mixtures and then diluting after mixing. No solubility problems so far except ONE I need help with. It is probably an obvious LOL, but here it is: I made a really nice oriental/spicy/woody composition, all aroma chemicals, but, I added myrrh . Yeah, myrrh, and that separated out 50%/50% with the rest of the material. Myrrh on bottom and everything else on top. Mixable to a cloudy composition, but re-separates out after a while. The reason I added myrrh is I wanted (although probably prematurely, because I am just getting started with all this) to add something natural. So, here are my questions:

    1)

    (a) - Is there a way to get them to combine? (I know, myrrh is just about the thickest essential oil there is. :-) I would toss it and start over, but I really like how it smells, so if I can save it that would be nice. Would adding this to perfumers alcohol (ethanol / t-butenol) fix the problem? What about DPG; would that do it? Something else?

    (b) - Are there ever cases where both DPG and perfumers alcohol would or could be used together to dilute a fragrance composition?


    2) I am leaning toward using perfumers alcohol as a dilution because it appears most every (not all) perfume house uses it - usually first on the
    ingredients list with eau/water. Ok, so,

    (a) - What is the texture of DPG? Is it similar to ethanol or is it thicker/slimier/oily, etc?
    (b) - Why does perfumers alcohol often also have t-butenol in it also? What is the function of it being in there?
    (c) - How long should a fragrance made with perfumers alcohol/ethanol/t-butenol sit for any over-alcohol potency to wear off?

    3) Speaking of cloudy mixtures of oils (saw this in the posts here), where you (Chris Bartlett) wrote about adding a preservative. What preservatives do you recommend and how much of them?

    I know this is a long post. If need be I can post it as a new post, but hopefully it is okay squeezed in here.

    Any help and comments appreciated, and thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    I'm afraid that isn't quite true, though it is certainly the case that oils and water will not mix without some help. There are some solubilisers / emulsifiers that you can use. The ingredients list quoted above from Christopher Brosius includes several good ones. Here are my notes from an earlier question on two that are more easily available to the amateur perfumer:

    DPM (dipropylene glyco mono methyl ether) which will enable more oils to dissolve properly in your water / alcohol mix but unfortunately it will also alter the smell (it smells slightly metallic). You need to use about double the volume of DPM that you have of oil and limit your mixture to about 5% aromatic ingredients.

    Polysorbate 20 - that is odourless but what you end up with will be slightly soapy and more like a traditional room spray than a perfume. This works well for low-concentrations - 1-3% aromatics with about the same of P-20 - at higher concentrations you'll struggle to get a sprayable mixture.

    If you go this route you'll also need to consider using a preservative since oil/water mixes are very attractive to bacteria. The good news is that some of the oils you are using for their scent have some preservative effect too, but even so if you have a cloudy liquid it is likely to attract unwanted growth and is best used up within a few weeks. If the liquid is clear it should keep for a year or so quite safely - more if you add preservatives.

    Ethanol is a great preservative as well as a very effective solvent that works with many polar and non-polar constituents - there is a very good reason why 99% of the perfume sold in the world is made with an alcohol base.

    The final alternative is to stop using alcohol or water at all and instead make an oil based perfume, diluting it with DPG, fractionated coconut oil or cyclomethicone: only the last of these will yield a perfume you can spray and even then it's not as good as an ethanol based one. Note that I'm not suggesting jojoba which goes rancid too quickly - it's widely used in the aromatherapy market, I think, because it is nice to rub into the skin in massage. But it is not suitable for making perfume despite the large number of articles on the net that suggest otherwise.
    Last edited by jesignor; 17th April 2014 at 04:51 PM. Reason: spelling error

  24. #24

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    I would bet that this "Zolvent" is a (Silicone type) Cyclomethicone / Dimethicone / Cyclopentasiloxane / Cyclotetrasiloxane based blend.

    Solubility of materials in this medium is part of it's issue. You will need to test materials solubility before using it.

    It's not a Be-all End-all.



    In what did you dilute the blend containing the Myrrh? Your statements do not tell us.
    "(a) - Is there a way to get them to combine? " We can't answer without knowing the substrate.

    Mixing this blend of raw materials in Perfumers Alcohol, *should* have no solubitilty issues.


    Most of the time, since you are USA based, I recommend SDA 40B Perfumer's alcohol as the substrate of (my) choice.
    Clouding doesn't happen if you use no extra water, but might/will if you use something that includes water without knowing it. To clear the solution, add more 200 proof ethyl alcohol.

    Perfumers alcohol comes in several variations, search out SDA 40B and SDA 39C for the two to pick from to start with.

    PK
    Paul Kiler
    PK Perfumes
    http://www.PKPERFUMES.com
    Gold Medal for "Best Aroma"; Los Angeles Artisan Fragrance Salon

  25. #25

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    To follow up from Paul...

    You need to tell us the source of the myrrh you used. Where did you get it? I suspect that your myrrh is not pure, but contains some solvent or other carrier, possibly an oil that is insoluble in water or perfumer's alcohol. Pure myrrh is a solid gum or resin that comes in little tears or pellets. I doubt that's what you used. You may have to ask your myrrh supplier what they put into their myrrh product. Then we can help.

    You asked if DPG and perfumers alcohol would or could be used together. The answer is yes. They dissolve in each other.

    You asked: Why does perfumers alcohol often also have t-butenol [SIC]? This is to "denature it", which means to make it undrinkable. The fear is that people will buy cheap perfumer's alcohol and use it to make alcoholic drinks. The government does not want this because they make a lot of tax money from the sale of alcohol. So they add stuff to make perfumer's alcohol undrinkable. T-butanol actually has a slight camphor-like odor and I can smell it. It goes away in the first 10 - 20 seconds, but it sure has an effect on the first impression of a perfume. Unless your perfume has a minty or camphor-like smell to it, I would not use perfumer's alcohol that has been denatured with t-butanol. A better choice is perfumer's alcohol denatured with Bitrex also known as denatonium benzoate, because such a tiny amount is used that you cannot smell it. With any alcohol used for perfumery, before buying it, always ask to sniff a little sample on a piece of paper. You can tell right away if the alcohol has odors that will be undesirable in a perfume.

    You asked, "How long should a fragrance made with perfumers alcohol/ethanol/t-butenol sit for any over-alcohol potency to wear off?" I don't know what "over-alcohol potency" means. Please explain. But if you mean the smell of ethanol (i.e. perfumer's alcohol) then that will never wear off, as I understand it. If you are talking about the smell of t-butanol in your alcohol, then that too will never wear off from just sitting. Both the ethanol and t-butanol evaporate very quickly once the perfume is applied to skin or cloth, usually in about 10 or 20 seconds. The t-butanol takes a bit longer, but it goes within the first minute.

  26. #26

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    I think I have found where all this alcohol + water + oil misinformation comes from:

    http://chemistry.about.com/od/chemis...akeperfume.htm

    How would this ever work?

  27. #27

    Default Re: Problems with blending oils with alcohol or water

    Oh dear. Whenever I see "about.com" in the browser address bar I immediately close the window. No matter what the subject. Stay away from anything on about.com and get out as quickly as possible if you accidentally fall into their many trap pages on the Internet. it's a terrible abomination.

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