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  1. #1

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    Default Frankincense in Aventus?

    Just sprayed this on paper and two hours later all the fruityness is replaced by smoke and wood. I'm detecting a pretty genereous amount of frankincense (not listed in the scent pyramid), or am I imagining things?

  2. #2
    hednic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    I persoanlly don't get that but then again I don't have the most discerning nose.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    I don't get frankincense either. Maybe a hint of olibanum (unburnt resin) in combination with smoky birchtar but not really prominent.

  4. #4
    Dependent Partario's Avatar
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    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Yes, full of frankincense. You spelled Jubilation XXV wrong in your thread title though.
    Last edited by Partario; 7th December 2011 at 02:25 PM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Quote Originally Posted by Partario View Post
    You spelled Jubilation XXV wrong in your thread title though.
    you might want to look into not to be a dill-hole. just a suggestion...


    uh oh, did I spell "dill-hole" wrong?

  6. #6
    Dependent Partario's Avatar
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    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Quote Originally Posted by Minaj View Post
    you might want to look into not to be a dill-hole. just a suggestion...


    uh oh, did I spell "dill-hole" wrong?
    Whoa. Just joking, bro. No foul meant. Never heard of a "dill-hole" though. Do share.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Quote Originally Posted by Partario View Post
    Whoa. Just joking, bro. No foul meant. Never heard of a "dill-hole" though.
    ehh, it's kinda popular over in teh States...

    and my bad, i get the joke now. it's early. no coffee yet. i'll go hide.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    I don't get the Frankincense either.....All I know is that Aventus smells fantastic and brings compliments!!!
    Gary

  9. #9

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Quote Originally Posted by Minaj View Post
    ehh, it's kinda popular over in teh States...
    Which state?

  10. #10
    Dependent Partario's Avatar
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    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Quote Originally Posted by Minaj View Post
    and my bad, i get the joke now. it's early. no coffee yet. i'll go hide.
    Don't sweat it man, honestly. I don't get 90% of the jokes on here, and it's hard to communicate tone in text. Easy misunderstanding.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasenmann View Post
    I don't get frankincense either. Maybe a hint of olibanum (unburnt resin) in combination with smoky birchtar but not really prominent.
    In an effort to move this thread away from the prevalence of certain insults by geography . . .

    Olibanum and Frankincense are essentially the same thing: both are used by the majority of authors to refer to the resin extracted from Boswelia species - there is a thread in the Single Note Exploration section with some details of the different scents that come from different sources and species.

    Some authorities, and some biblical scholars do try to draw a distinction - for example that olibanum refers to the resin from Boswelia serrata with the various other species being frankincense - the trouble is that there is no agreement on which refers to what. Olibanum is the term almost universally used in the perfumery suppliers world, while frankincense is more common in general usage and the aromatherapy market.

    In perfumery it is normally the essential oil (produced by steam distillation of the resin) that is used, though sometimes the resin is tinctured directly. So far as I know no-one has captured the smoke from burning incense to get it into a perfume, though quite a few perfumes imitate that effect using other materials.
    Last edited by Chris Bartlett; 7th December 2011 at 04:59 PM. Reason: added italics to the botanical name
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Interesting, thanks for the clarification! What I meant to express above was that I don't get the typical churchy type of Olibanum/Frankincense but rather that of unburnt resin/essential oil in Aventus. I do get the smoky aspects in it too but it doesn't create the churchy effect either, wether there is Olibanum/Frankincense or not in it.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    In an effort to move this thread away from the prevalence of certain insults by geography . . .

    Olibanum and Frankincense are essentially the same thing: both are used by the majority of authors to refer to the resin extracted from Boswelia species - there is a thread in the Single Note Exploration section with some details of the different scents that come from different sources and species.

    Some authorities, and some biblical scholars do try to draw a distinction - for example that olibanum refers to the resin from Boswelia serrata with the various other species being frankincense - the trouble is that there is no agreement on which refers to what. Olibanum is the term almost universally used in the perfumery suppliers world, while frankincense is more common in general usage and the aromatherapy market.

    In perfumery it is normally the essential oil (produced by steam distillation of the resin) that is used, though sometimes the resin is tinctured directly. So far as I know no-one has captured the smoke from burning incense to get it into a perfume, though quite a few perfumes imitate that effect using other materials.
    Talk chemistry to me! Throw in some history of fragrance! I love it when knowledgeable members get factual, historical and chemically real.

    Why is it I enjoy listening to chemical explanations, historical backgrounds for ingredients etc. It is very informative, comforting, historically relevant and gives much needed perspective. I wish we had more threads that explained the real story behind the the making of fragrances. I also like listening to the History Channel, Nova's Theory of Everything, How It's Made, etc.

    Thanks for an informative bit of info.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    You're entirely welcome and I'm glad to know I've managed to provide some entertainment value . . . I don't think I've ever been compared to The History Channel before!
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    In perfumery it is normally the essential oil (produced by steam distillation of the resin) that is used, though sometimes the resin is tinctured directly. So far as I know no-one has captured the smoke from burning incense to get it into a perfume, though quite a few perfumes imitate that effect using other materials.
    Chris, are you able to provide any insight into how the smokey/airy effect is achieved?
    There are some fragrances where the frankincense smell hits high in the nostril in much the same way as burned incense. I wasn't aware this was a chemical play.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Sorry to have taken so long to respond to this.

    There are quite a few ways you can acheive this kind of effect and I can’t say how it has been done in any particular case, however the use of Birch Tar or Cade is common to give a smoky scent (in both cases you have to use rectified oils as there are IFRA prohibitions on the crude versions of both - these are both naturals and although there are synthetic alternatives I prefer the naturals in this case).

    To get the airy quality something like Iso E Super or Kephalis would probably be a good choice perhaps combined with Piconia to add to the incense quality. I’d also be inclined to incorporate other resins such as myrrh and benzoin to enhance the effect and I’d probably use one or more of the synthetic ambergris too to help it last and give that light airy quality.

    Hope that helps.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    I don't know about Frankincense in Aventus, but am I the only one who detects a prominent virginian cedar note? Thinly disguised pencil shavings, which I love by the way! I'm guessing the smokiness is that with a trace of birch tar or cade, as Chris suggested.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Frankincense in Aventus?

    Virginian Cedar certainly smells like pencil shavings. Try mixing it with basil for a very interesting effect . . .

    You are also correct that whether you use birch tar or cade you need only a trace - any more and the whole fragrance ends up smelling like a freshly extinguished bonfire.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

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