Code of Conduct
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 35
o
  1. #1

    Default complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Hi and first off, Hello! I am very excited to be starting my hobby in perfumery.

    I have researched and researched the internet and this website but now I think I have 'information overload'.

    I would like to know which of the following options will suits me best, being brand new and all.

    Perfumersworld K-26 Kit
    Perfumersworld K-161 Kit
    Perfumers Apprentice starter kits
    My own collections from lists found online within the forum (still very overwhelmed but need to start learning somewhere).

    Thank you all for your help and assistance, I look forward to being a valued member of this forum as my experience and knowledge increases.

  2. #2

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Hello and welcome to Basenotes DIY forum.

    Happy New Year!

    Now, to your questions.

    First up I certainly would not buy the Perfumersworld Kits, partly because the website does not appear to make clear exactly what is in either of them - for 161 I could not even find a list of what you are getting for nearly $1k, which is hard to believe! Partly because one of the kits consists entirely of ‘bases’ devised by their in-house perfumer - no formula supplied - which means having learned to mix them you will have learned nothing useful about mixing anything else and will simply be a captive customer of Perfumersworld. Partly because they supply ‘Zolvent’ an unspecified ‘non-alcoholic carrier oil’ simply to fit in with their ABC gimmick and mostly because the general impression I got from looking at the website was that they have devised the whole thing to take advantage.

    The Perfumer’s Apprentice kits by comparison are thoroughly documented, based on clearly identified materials that real, working perfumers use and put together by people who are dedicated to enabling others to learn about perfumery rather than merely take them for as much money as possible. That being said I would still hesitate to buy natural materials from PA simply because I think most can be obtained more cheaply elsewhere: there is a large and competitive market in essential oils that does not exist for small quantities of aroma-chemicals. Their range of aroma chemicals is however excellent, their explanations of everything some of the best available and prices at least reasonable (especially if you don’t have to pay all the extra costs associated with getting the stuff out of the USA).

    Whatever kit you buy, my betting is that within a short time you’ll want to expand out into other materials quite quickly so it isn’t a bad idea to start off buying things that interest you - with help from the several lists in this forum and elsewhere. The advantage of a kit is that you’ll have a good basic set without having to do all the thinking and planning necessary to put it together - the disadvantage is that you won’t have the benefit of the learning that comes with doing that research either.

    If you want to end up making the kind of perfumes you are familiar with buying in the big Department stores you are also going to need to get hold of, and get to grips with using, ethanol rather than carrier oils: only a tiny percentage of the worlds perfume production is sold diluted in carrier oils.

    I hope that helps!
    ďBattle cries and champagne just in time for sunrise.
    ― David Bowie
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    Fine fragrances hand made in The Shire
    Quality perfume making ingredients
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume
    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog for more info about perfumes and perfumery.

  3. #3

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Hi Chris, thank you for such a detailed reply. It is very much appreciated.

    Since I am obsessive compulsive in nature, I'd love to start learning the best possible way but with complete control. i think I will just start collecting myself from the lists within this forum and go from there.

    The explanations you detailed are the exact reasons I was unsure about any of the available kits. In any industry, there are always people out there trying to get a lot of money from a newbie, and most of the time it is to their success and not the newbies.

    Now I just need to find a practical starting list and begin playing/mixing/learning......

    Thank you once again for your time in replying, it is 'very' much appreciated!

  4. #4

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    You’re welcome

    I’ve done a couple of starter lists myself that are on here somewhere - one for naturals and one for synthetics - I’ll see if I can find them and copy them in here. It might be useful for other people to have them together too.
    ďBattle cries and champagne just in time for sunrise.
    ― David Bowie
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    Fine fragrances hand made in The Shire
    Quality perfume making ingredients
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume
    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog for more info about perfumes and perfumery.

  5. #5

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Here is my starter-list of aroma-chemicals:

    In no particular order:
    Synthetic Ambergris - there are several and I use one in many, many accords I make - Ambroxan and Ambrarome are common ones.
    Iso E Super - adds a unique diffusive quality to many accords. IFRA limits this to 21.4% but that's more than you are ever likely to want to use anyway - I find 2% is plenty in a finished product (that's 2% of the total product not 2% of the aromatics, just to be clear)
    Hedione - works well in lots of blends especially florals, it brightens the blend and enhances many florals especially the jasmines, but by no means only those. It can be used quite freely.
    Synthetic Civet and Castoreum - these are vital for adding animalic notes to perfumes where you are not using real animal ingredients. Use with caution and keep well diluted - 0.1% and 1%. Ambrarome is a less powerful animalic note with more leathery quality than civet that works really well to fix and diffuse florals especially chypre types.
    Musks: Ambrettolide, Celestolide, Ethylene brassylate, Exaltolide, Galaxolide, Habanolide, Muscone, Romandolide, Tonalide etc. - all useful, all slightly different.
    Vanillin, Ethyl vanillin - these are vital for sweetening and softening blends - strong chemicals though so keep diluted to about 1%
    Lilial, Lyral and hydroxycitronellal - these are all imitations of Lily of the Valley, all different and all restricted by IFRA to low usage. Even so they enhance a lot of floral and other blends in small amounts and are lovely used in combination with each-other and many florals.
    Methyl ionone (& ionone alpha and beta) - useful to add some 'punch' to florals and add depth - quite heady and not that nice on their own but enhance a lot of blends. Essential to add a violet note.
    Geranyl acetate and Linalyl acetate are especially useful to add top notes when you don't want either citrus or lavender to be apparent in your blend. They will enhance all sorts of other things too.
    Calone is a wonderful clean, fresh sea-breeze note that is essential for creating those popular 'aqua' type colognes. Strong stuff so dilute to 1%. Ultrazur is an alternative with similar effects.
    Floralozone is similar but more versatile in small quantities in lots of blends to brighten them up - as the name implies much more ozonic and also more floral.
    Helional, stemone, verdilyn and cis-3-hexanyl acetate are all good green notes
    Javanol is a good replacement for or booster with sandalwood (more booster than full replacement really). Ebanol and sandalmysore are more direct replacements for sandalwood oil.
    Cedramber is a nice cedar-wood like scent with some depth
    Veramoss is a substitute for Oakmoss - not as good as the real thing but handy to boost it because the IFRA permitted quantities are so low. Good general fixative too.
    Vertofix is a good general fixative with a warm woody scent with an ambery, slightly leathery quality.

    I’ve missed off the main aldehydes as these are probably a bit more difficult to work with and so best left for a later order but it does depend on your priorities - if your ambition is to produce something like Channel No5 then you’re going to need to get to grips with them:

    Here are the main ones I use (and I keep them all diluted to 1% in ethanol when blending, except where noted, as they are strong):

    C-11 undecylenic - very powerful, rosy-citrus-woody effect with a soapy element. Use in traces.
    C12 lauric - a waxy, citrus-rind note. Very useful and distinctive.
    C12 MNA - curious stuff with a fresh scent but base-note characteristics. Amplifies musks and ambers.
    C14 Peach - distinctive fatty-peache aroma. Actually a lactone rather than an aldehyde. Very fruity.
    C12 Strawberry - strawberry, waxy scent. Not as obviously strawberry as the previous one is peachy, works well with florals to brighten them. Very persistent.
    Cyclamen aldehyde - lovely soft, transparent floral scent. I use this one at 10%
    Cucumber aldehyde - very strong, distinctive cucumber / melon scent. A little will smell like cucumber, a tiny, tiny trace will brighten almost any blend, but it’s so powerful I keep this at 0.1% to work with and even then only use very small amounts.

    BTW, ethyl vanillin is technically an aldehyde but I’ve already listed it as it does not need quite the same caution as most of the group - though it does have the characteristic power.
    ďBattle cries and champagne just in time for sunrise.
    ― David Bowie
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    Fine fragrances hand made in The Shire
    Quality perfume making ingredients
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume
    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog for more info about perfumes and perfumery.

  6. #6

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    To add to Chris Bartlett's excellent posts, I'd just reiterate that you MUST dilute most of the aroma chemicals to at least 10% and quite often 1% or even less. Some, such as Lyral, start off where you cannot smell them, but then after a second or third time, you CAN totally smell them, even to the point where they become annoying. Then there are some like Benzyl Salicylate that you can barely smell even in large amounts, and yet in a blend they end up doing something amazing.

    I would also suggest you try the technique that I've seen in many books where you try various pairs of smells, pairing them at 20/80, 40/60, 60/40, 80/20, and noticing how they go together at each proportion, how they smell at first, and how they evolve with time. Knowing these pairings will be really helpful when you have to compose new combinations.

    The other thing you must do is write everything down. I use a spreadsheet and put notes down for every blend, and every exercise, and also, over time, as Chris suggested. It's really important to make these notes because you will go back to them over and over again.

    I got started by asking Luca Turin to recommend a basic list of starting materials for a beginner. He pointed me to all-naturals at profumo.it. Each of these is already diluted to 10% or some dilution that is reasonable for the particular essential oil. It makes it very easy for a beginner to get started making some nice blends, with very little fuss. A key difficulty with essential oils is finding a source you can trust. I think that profumo.it is a trustworthy vendor.

    Here's Luca Turin's suggested list for a beginner, followed by the link to where you order them.

    Flowers
    --------
    Geranium
    Jasmine
    Lavender
    Neroli
    Osmanthus
    Tuberose
    Rose (Turkish)
    Ylang ylang

    Fruity
    ------
    Bergamot
    Grapefruit
    Lemon
    Petit grain

    Spice
    ------
    Clove
    Thyme
    Vanilla

    Trees & woody
    ----------------
    Cedar (Marocco)
    Myrtle
    Oak Moss
    Vetiver
    Patchouli
    Rose wood
    Sandalwood (Mysore)

    Resins
    -------
    Benzoin
    Cistus
    Galbanum
    Oppoponax
    Styrax

    Animals
    ---------
    Castoreum
    Civet

    Special
    --------
    Iris
    Tonka
    Violet leaves

    Scroll down the page at this link to order: http://www.profumo.it/perfume/custom_perfumes_new.asp

  7. #7

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Great list of suggestions - my list of naturals (which I’ve yet to track down) is very similar. I would have missed out tuberose and osmanthus, only because they are both so expensive and myrtle because I hadn’t thought of it. Also I would not use natural civet for moral reasons - I don’t have the same issue with castoreum. All the rest would certainly be on my list assuming that cistus means labdanum (Cistus ladanifer or Cistus creticus).

    My additions would include juniper, rosemary, coriander and basil, sweet orange, lime and green mandarin all of which I use quite a lot and find easy to work with. I might also include both Atlas and Virginian cedar.

    There are probably cheaper places to buy these oils too, though I must agree with the reliability of Profumo.it as a source.
    ďBattle cries and champagne just in time for sunrise.
    ― David Bowie
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    Fine fragrances hand made in The Shire
    Quality perfume making ingredients
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume
    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog for more info about perfumes and perfumery.

  8. #8

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Hi Chris: yes Labdanum. Profumo's "cistus" is a really nice one, too. The tuberose and osmanthus are not overly expensive, though they are somewhat more dilute, (everything is diluted in 95% ethanol), so that's how the price is kept low. The point is: a novice can still experience these exquisite natural essences and use them in practice fragrances. It's a lot of fun.

    I agree with all your additional natural essences, too.

  9. #9
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Hi! Like the original poster I am just starting to pursue a longstanding interest in hobby perfumery and am compiling a "starter kit."

    I am grateful for this excellent thread and am using the above posts to order the various synthetic and natural aroma chemicals.

    It looks like many of the aroma chemicals come as crystaline solids, some come already dissolved in IPM, some are liquids, etc.

    I am a laboratory scientist by occupation, and as such have access to very pure 95% ethanol, and am very familiar with making dilutions and weighing and dissolving solid chemicals. I'm planning on making ethanol-based perfumes. Is the thing to do is to dissolve/dilute the aroma chemicals each into an ethanol stock solution (like the above mentioned ones at 10% or 1% depending on the chemical) and use these for mixing?

    Are all the above listed chemicals soluble in ethanol? Will I need any other solvents or diluents like Isopropyl myristate (IPM), propylene glycol (PG), benzyl benzoate, etc? Which would you recommend that the beginner have on hand to get started? Thanks!

  10. #10

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    I think everything on those lists is soluble in ethanol and yes, making stock solutions is the way I do it. There are things that you will need other solvents for: musk ketone is normally dissolved in benzyl benzoate for example and I have a lovely Juniper Berry CO2 select that needs some help from IPM to get into solution in ethanol.

    IPM, PG, DPG, TEC and so forth are all commonly used - I’d suggest sticking with ethanol to begin with though and move to the others as you find you need them. Check the entries on the Good Scents Company site for solubility of most ingredients in the more common solvents - there is usually a list if you are likely to have any trouble with ethanol.
    ďBattle cries and champagne just in time for sunrise.
    ― David Bowie
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    Fine fragrances hand made in The Shire
    Quality perfume making ingredients
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume
    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog for more info about perfumes and perfumery.

  11. #11
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    California
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    That's great, thanks Chris!

    So, does one typically make a standard dilution (e.g. 50% w/v?) stock solutions, with a few very potent compounds stored at greater dilutions (e.g. the aldehydes mentioned above?).

    Or, is it advisable to make up stocks that vary in concentration from chemical to chemical according to solubility, how strong it is, etc? Any tips?

    Sorry for such a mundane question, but I'm just trying to get oriented about some of these mechanics before I really get started.

  12. #12

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Ah, I’m glad you mentioned w/v because I should have realised that as a laboratory scientist it would be your default. For perfumery it’s important that you dilute everything on a w/w basis because that’s how the regulations are framed and it’s how any pre-diluted materials you buy will have been diluted.

    I keep most of my stock solutions at 10% in ethanol - a few at higher percentages (things that are often used in larger amounts such as Hedione), a few lower (such as the aldehydes, violet leaf absolute, or calone) according to odour yield and these are what I use when I’m designing blends or making up small amounts. Almost everything will go into solution at about 10% in ethanol, even if you need another solvent to help it along. The major exception to that is natural CO2 extracts which are sometimes almost completely insoluble in ethanol and a whole other subject.

    With materials that are solid when pure (or usually solid, like Exaltolide for example, which melts at about 35 C) I tend to keep a higher percentage stock solution as well - 50% is good - to use when I’m mixing a concentrate.

    Hope that helps and don’t worry about mundane questions!
    ďBattle cries and champagne just in time for sunrise.
    ― David Bowie
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    Fine fragrances hand made in The Shire
    Quality perfume making ingredients
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume
    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog for more info about perfumes and perfumery.

  13. #13

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    I am also looking to have a go at this, but the price deters me a bit. If I limit myself to the essential oils list mentioned here, I am still looking at an order of 600 euros. Or am I missing something? Chances are that I will use most of it mixing up expensive stenches instead of fragrances...

  14. #14

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Quote Originally Posted by thomash View Post
    I am also looking to have a go at this, but the price deters me a bit. If I limit myself to the essential oils list mentioned here, I am still looking at an order of 600 euros. Or am I missing something? Chances are that I will use most of it mixing up expensive stenches instead of fragrances...
    There are lots of other places to buy the naturals, many of which will be cheaper. The synthetics are not so widely available, but there are several sources you can look at including Hermitage, De Hekserij and Olfactik in Europe and Perfumerís Apprentice and Perfume Supply House in the US.

    Iíve given some more comprehensive recommendations on my blog about what to consider to start with, that you may find helpful too.
    ďBattle cries and champagne just in time for sunrise.
    ― David Bowie
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    Fine fragrances hand made in The Shire
    Quality perfume making ingredients
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume
    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog for more info about perfumes and perfumery.

  15. #15
    Super Member nicok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    311

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    I'd like to add here that olfactik's formula kits are very good.
    The largest kit has anything somebody needs to build jasmine and rose from scratch and also make a chypre or fougere base.
    I'd also like to advise the starters not to spend so much on naturals and particularly the super expensive ones as jasmine abs or tuberose absolute.

    There are really nice bases to replace these materials at least for the beginners.
    If I was starting now I would purchase for example all the sandalwood synthetics available instead of 5g real sandalwood that is so faint

  16. #16

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Thanks for the pointers guys!
    The prices of Olfactik are the lowest I've found so far. Their kits seem pretty nice too. I was already considering to kick out the expensive naturals and replace them with an acceptable synthetic. At least while I'm still learning, unless there is a very strong reason not to. There seem to be some naturals included with these kits, like bergamot, geranium, neroli, lavender, oak moss, patchouli, sandalwood and vetiver. Are these the naturals? No need to place a double order for these...
    Does anyone know off the top of their head how high or low their shipment costs are? If not, I'll just drop them an email, dont worry.

    In any case thanks for the imput!

  17. #17
    Super Member nicok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    311

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Yes it's a nice kit, and it was around 20-30 pounds I think for the shipment.
    geranium, neroli, bergamot, oakmoss, patchouli, sandalwood are all naturals from this kit. Don't buy them again!


    there are tens of things u probably don't need for the beginning like Padma, vetiver or oak moss, but it has anything u need to build a rose accord or jasmine or a fougere base or a chypre base.

    Also this kit doesn't have iso E super and dihydromyrnesol. So buy a large quantity at least from the first. It is absolutely essential.

  18. #18

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    nicok, as it seems like you have this kit, could you specify the 8 floral bases you can build with it? Just to know which natural essetial oils I can take off the list when buying this kit.

    I am also a bit confused about the term "floral base". Does it just mean that it is a basis further develop the scent upon? Or does it mean that these are necesarily base notes as opposed to top or middle notes?

  19. #19
    Super Member nicok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Dublin
    Posts
    311

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Quote Originally Posted by thomash View Post
    nicok, as it seems like you have this kit, could you specify the 8 floral bases you can build with it? Just to know which natural essetial oils I can take off the list when buying this kit.

    I am also a bit confused about the term "floral base". Does it just mean that it is a basis further develop the scent upon? Or does it mean that these are necesarily base notes as opposed to top or middle notes?
    I have the kit number 3, and it came with the formulas of several bases. I don't remember them all but I can l check it and tell u.
    The bases are jasmine, rose, chypre, fougere, lily of the valley, tuberose, hyacinth, honeysuckle and maybe one more.

    A base is a different thing than a base note. It is a recreation of a scent made of some (usually around ten) materials. These materials can be synthetics, naturals or even other bases.

    I haven't blended all the bases from olfactik and some look weird. For example their base for tuberose recommends an overdose of lyral.. that I haven't seen in other tuberose bases.

    The jasmine base, rose and chypre are very good. Their chypre base is so nicely vintage too.

  20. #20

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    OK, so here is the list I plan on going with. I understand that going through this is a bit of a hassle, but any comments would be very much appreciated!

    It comes at 300 euro, and Im ordering from one supplier only, Olfaktic, to avoid extra shipping costs (this adds quite a bit to the total picture). Some things are missing because they are too expensive, mainly the flowers, and for now they will be replaced by the synthetic bases. Other things are missing simply because Olfaktic doesnt have them. Some of the other spices, for example. I could also pick those up locally I guess for a couple of extra euros.

    Is there any use in getting a steam destillation setup? I would like to include the scent some very local products in my creations. Or would tinctures be a more viable/easy option?

    Flowers
    --------
    Geranium
    Jasmine (base)
    Lavender
    Neroli
    Tuberose (base)
    Rose (base)

    Fruity
    ------
    Bergamot
    Grapefruit
    Lemon
    Petit grain
    sweet orange
    lime
    green mandarin

    Spice
    ------
    Clove
    Coriander
    juniper

    Trees & woody
    ----------------
    Myrtle
    Oak Moss
    Vetiver
    Patchouli
    Sandalwood (Mysore)
    Cedar atlas

    Resins
    -------
    Benzoin
    Cistus
    Galbanum
    Oppoponax



    Special
    --------
    Tonka


    synthetics
    -----
    ACA
    Aldehyde C9 (Nonenal) (10%)
    alpha Terpineol HP
    alpha Ionone
    Anisaldehyde
    Aurantiol
    Benzyl acetate
    Benzyl alcohol
    Benzyl propionate
    Benzyl salicylate
    beta Ionone
    cis 3 hexenyl Acetate
    Citronellol
    Coumarin (50%)
    DBCA
    Equalide (Musk)
    Eugenol
    Geraniol
    Hedione
    Indole (10% solution)
    Linalool
    Linalyl acetate
    Lyral
    Mehtyl anthranilate
    Methyl benzoate
    Methyl ionone
    Methyl nonylenate (10%)
    Methyl salicylate (50%)
    Musk T
    Nerol
    Phenyl acetaldehyde
    Phenylethyl alcohol
    Vanillin (50%)
    iso E super
    geranyl acetate
    lilial
    cedrambrette
    octanal
    decanal
    C14 peach

  21. #21
    Basenotes Plus
    pkiler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    8,912

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    As for what is possibly missing, you might consult the stickie:
    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/374...Aromachemicals

    If you have not already...

    As for a Still, and whether it is the choice vs Tinctures. Certainly Tincturing is easiest and fastest. but it also depends upon the material and it's nature. Distilling will net you a more concentrated material as well, it sort of depends upon your plants, purpose, and requirements.

    And for tinctures, you can always repeatedly "charge" the alcohol, by placing more material into the same alcohol, and therefore, makign it a 3X fold or 5X folded tincture, which may indeed be strong enough for most uses. The only two plants that I tincture, I do so, because they have a resin on their leaves which contains the scent, which dissolves readily into alcohol,

    The other bit to contend with when tincturing of course is water content of the plants that is transferred to the Alocohol, which may later pose issues dependant upon usage.


    PK
    Last edited by pkiler; 20th June 2014 at 07:09 PM.
    Paul Kiler
    PK Perfumes
    http://www.PKPERFUMES.com
    In addition to Our own PK line, we make Custom Bespoke Perfumes, perfumes for Entrepreneurs needing scents for perfumes or products, Custom Wedding Perfumes, and even Special Event Perfumes.

  22. #22

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Please let us know how you get on Thomash, would love to know how the Mysore Sandalwood smells. Fee free to check out my link below - I may be able to help you fill some of the gaps in your naturals.
    The Little Blue Bottle Premium Perfume Kits Now Available
    https://twitter.com/TLBBPPK
    http://www.thelittlebluebottle.com.au/

  23. #23

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    There are lots of other places to buy the naturals, many of which will be cheaper. The synthetics are not so widely available, but there are several sources you can look at including Hermitage, De Hekserij and Olfactik in Europe and Perfumer’s Apprentice and Perfume Supply House in the US.

    I’ve given some more comprehensive recommendations on my blog about what to consider to start with, that you may find helpful too.
    wow, that's dedication (take a look at the dates of the posts), thumbs up to you Chris! How have you made out since your posts in 2012? In terms of your tastes? Wardrobe changes, etc...?

  24. #24

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Quote Originally Posted by Niche1 View Post
    Please let us know how you get on Thomash, would love to know how the Mysore Sandalwood smells. Fee free to check out my link below - I may be able to help you fill some of the gaps in your naturals.
    I will certainly get back to you on that, but in september. I decided to teach myself the history, lingo and classifications of perfumery before buying any raw materials. Furthermore, I am currently sniffing everything I encounter in the "real world" (well, not everything). I noticed that I really dont know what common things *actually* smell like.

    This slow approach is in part due to organisational reasons, but the idea is to be fully prepared when I start to learn composing stuff. I know, it sounds and feels like Im just torturing myself

  25. #25

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Good plan, I did the same thing until I couldn't wait anymore and I found that I needed a smell to go with all the terms I was learning. I started by visiting a perfumer in Melbourne that had a scent bar of accords - she also kindly let me smell most of her materials. Good luck with the learning,
    The Little Blue Bottle Premium Perfume Kits Now Available
    https://twitter.com/TLBBPPK
    http://www.thelittlebluebottle.com.au/

  26. #26

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Quote Originally Posted by thomash View Post
    I will certainly get back to you on that, but in september. I decided to teach myself the history, lingo and classifications of perfumery before buying any raw materials. Furthermore, I am currently sniffing everything I encounter in the "real world" (well, not everything). I noticed that I really dont know what common things *actually* smell like.

    This slow approach is in part due to organisational reasons, but the idea is to be fully prepared when I start to learn composing stuff. I know, it sounds and feels like Im just torturing myself
    That's a very good way to begin. In general we don't use our sense of smell nearly enough; we need to smell everything and realise how wonderful our sense of smell is. The more you do something the better you get at doing it.

  27. #27

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheOpiumJuices View Post
    wow, that's dedication (take a look at the dates of the posts), thumbs up to you Chris! How have you made out since your posts in 2012? In terms of your tastes? Wardrobe changes, etc...?
    My palette now runs to about 1000 different materials so Iím not sure posting the list is a good plan - I think Basenotes might object - and anyway it isnít something fun to read.

    Despite this I still find Iím constantly investigating new materials and ways of combining existing ones: thatís part of what makes it fun though!

    That post has been updated a couple of times since I first made it so it still represents a set of things I consider a good place to start. They are all still things I use regularly myself too.
    ďBattle cries and champagne just in time for sunrise.
    ― David Bowie
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    Fine fragrances hand made in The Shire
    Quality perfume making ingredients
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume
    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog for more info about perfumes and perfumery.

  28. #28
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    137

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Thomas, I couldn't agree more with David Ruskin about educating your nose. Unfortunately, because of some lingering hangups about physicality and sensuality in Western culture, our physical and sensual education is often lacking. But if one wishes to be a perfumer, it is - pardon me - essential that one learn what things smell like. Modern perfumery, with its stunning array of aromachemicals, is now less concerned with duplicating natural fragrances than it once was, but starting with easily accessible natural aromatic materials is probably still a good idea. And if you should wish to concentrate on naturals, then it's absolutely imperative that you learn what things are supposed to smell like. When you're buying naturals, it will help you immensely - not just being able to tell the difference between thyme and rosemary without having to read the label, for example, but being able to tell from the fragrance of any given essential oil what conditions the plant must have grown in. With a sufficiently educated and experienced nose, you'll be able to read a story of soil and sun, water and weather in each essential oil - some more than others, though!
    "Just as the waters of all the great oceans of the world have but one taste, the taste of salt, so too do all true teachings have but one taste - the taste of liberation." --The Buddha

  29. #29

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    Hello everyone!

    Another beginner here. After studying the theory of perfumery for couple of months, I thought it's time for practicing. Some research on the internet, I ended up with couple of kits for beginners. All of them have been mentioned in the thread except for the one by Vetiver Aromatics:
    https://vetiveraromatics.com/collect...xe-perfume-kit

    I like the flexibility of this option for selecting almost any fragrance oil for the package. It also got good reviews. Do you have any comments about this product. Your help is much appreciated.

  30. #30

    Default Re: complete newbie, which starter kit please.

    To rezalotfalian: The problem is that fragrance oils are not good starting materials. You have no idea what is in them. They typically are made with synthetics of unknown origin. They are difficult to source if you need more or if you decide to produce in volume. Also, they are not "real". In that list we find things like honeysuckle and lily of the valley which are impossible to obtain from nature. These are one person's concept of these smells created from synthetic molecules, but not the real smells. In contrast, starting materials such as rose otto or orange oil are truly made from the real thing. Most of us on this forum probably believe that if you are serious about perfumery it is better to familiarize yourself with real natural materials as well as real synthetic molecules (such as hedione for instance) instead of buying fragrance oils. If you are just interested in having some fun and not serious in pursuing this as a serious hobby then the kit from vetiver aromatics will probably be a lot of fun. One more comment: for $200 you could buy A LOT of good real honest perfumery ingredients instead of a bunch of fake fragrance oils.




Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 28
    Last Post: 4th January 2018, 08:40 AM
  2. Help for a complete 23 year old newbie in the UK
    By MissHKeith in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 3rd June 2010, 05:20 PM
  3. Starter Oud scent?
    By chipper in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 29th July 2009, 03:45 AM
  4. starter animalic
    By ands in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10th December 2008, 07:01 AM
  5. My Starter Post!
    By elleana in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 18th June 2007, 04:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000