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  1. #31

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Quote Originally Posted by Irina View Post
    Thank you, Chris, this already an awesome starting point!

    I do have an important side note: I assume you are aware of the upcoming EC regulation for EU (2013) 1223/2009 regarding toxicity? Those standards override the IFRA percentages (and most of the times are a lot lower) due to toxicological exposure %.
    http://www.cosmeticsandtoiletries.co...132196008.html

    If one would make a perfume and sell it within the EU to the public with regards for the OP %, it does not necessarily mean that the particular perfume would be considered safe to be sold to the public. Therefore you would need an experienced toxicologist to calculate the individual MoS (Margin of Safety) for each substance that goes into the end product and advise the perfumer accordingly.

    An example for lavender essential oil the MoS in a lotion would be 0.5%
    http://www.efchemicalconsulting.co.uk/lavender-mos.pdf

    while according to IFRA a perfumer could use up to 1.6% in an edp (fragrance concentrate 10%)

    (p.s. the above calculation should be adjusted by a few % as a lotion falls into a different IFRA category and exposure than a perfume)

    For hobby purposes or non-EU standards the OP is great. However if you intend to make perfume professionally you would need to take these new regulatory developments into consideration (and yes, I agree that it's huge headache!).

    Maybe you could add this to the OP, Chris, just to make sure people are aware?

    eta spelling
    There is definitely an issue here - and I’m happy to explore it - at this point my interpretation and yours look rather different, so I’m seeking a more expert opinion before I say anything that might not be accurate.

    Also I think we will probably need a separate thread on it, to avoid getting tangled in different numbers: once I’ve got what I believe to be a definitive view I’ll see if I can put something together, but that may take a while.

    One thing is very clear - it’s going to give all of us a headache!
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
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    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

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    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  2. #32

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Chris, thank you, for me, you don't need to put more time into it, as I'm fully aware of the implications

    Just thought it was worth mentioning. Of course (anyone) feel free to begin another thread on it, my time is rather limited thus I can't do so atm (also not sure if this forum is targeted to the pro perfumer for that matter), but I would happily pitch in if the moment arises

    Thanks again for all the effort and time you put into keeping this DIY section alive, interesting and informative! *thumbs up*

  3. #33

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Quote Originally Posted by BoisLeLe View Post
    Thanks so much for all the great information. I spent hours on the IFRA site yesterday and came away with a bigger headache than the time I sniffed too much eucalyptus oil.

    My next challenge is in figuring out how to actually calculate the amounts of Eugenol and Geraniol. I'm thinking it must be more complicated than just weighing drops of Bergamot Oil vs. Alcohol. The IFRA site mentions "PPM" (parts per million, I'm assuming), but I can't find any reference to the actual PPM for these ingredients on my supplier's web site... I've checked the MSDS and C of A sheets.

    Any advice or guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thanks you!
    You have two options: you either need a specific GC/MS analysis of the oils you are using - you may be able to get that from your supplier if you ask - or you need to use the defined ‘typical maximum’ contents listed by IFRA in Annex 1 to the Code of Practice.

    In either case you then need to add up the amounts present in all the oils you are using in each product. A spreadsheet is a practical way to do this. Don’t forget that it isn’t just Eugenol and Geraniol - methyl eugenol is another particularly difficult one. I plan to add to this thread as an when I get time with more of the key practical areas to consider.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
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  4. #34
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Thanks, Chris. You rock!

  5. #35

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    I’ve added another batch of aroma chemicals to the OP tonight: celeriax, Hydratropic Aldehyde, Hyacinth butanal, Phenylacetaldehyde, Patchouli ethanone, 1-Octen-3-yl acetate and Tacrolimus.

    That completes all the items from the Restricted Standards (QRA) - so if you spot something I’ve missed please say so - all the Prohibited Standards are also in now, so I’ve just to add some of the Specification and non-QRA ones.

    Of the new set, the one you are probably most likely to encounter is Phenyl acetaldehyde (it’s more usually written with a space, but IFRA have it without so that’s what’s in the list). Anyway it smells like hyacinth, is usually diluted in Phenyl Ethyl Alcohol (PEA - an aromatic ingredient in it’s own right) and the restriction is quite low. It occurs in a range of natural products including lots of fruit and veg, coriander oil and narcissus absolute among others and the actual scent of hyacinths.

    Finally I realised that some of these chems are given such bewildering names (to those not trained in organic chemistry) and have such a wide range of different ways of writing the name, plus in many cases pithier brand names that it can be very hard to know just what you are talking about.

    Throughout the list I’ve tried to start with the most commonly used name with other common ones and the name IFRA uses in brackets. With all the new additions I’ve also added a link to the Good Scents page on that material where you can see a list of synonyms, a list of some of the natural occurrences if any and get a link direct to the standard. Eventually I plan to put those in for everything and I wish I’d thought of it to start with . . .
    Last edited by Chris Bartlett; 7th June 2012 at 06:50 PM. Reason: minor corrections
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
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    Chris Bartlett
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  6. #36
    Super Member otocione's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks again Chris. You made a good choice writing phenylacetaldehyde that way, since that comes from the IUPAC name which requires the words to be joint.
    For those who encounter problems with this names it's good to remember that each material has its own CAS number, you can find it easily via google and use it as a key for your searches (it's useful because it's written always the same of course).

  7. #37
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    Default

    Sorry double post

  8. #38

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    I did think about putting CAS numbers into the list, but in the end I didn’t because they too are subject to some confusion. Take Lyral for example - the name that appears in the IFRA list is

    3and4-(4-Hydroxy-4-methylpentyl)-3-cyclohexene-1-carboxaldehyde (HMPCC)

    The ‘3and4’ part of which is recognising that there are actually two similar substances involved, with CAS numbers:
    31906-04-4
    51414-25-6
    These same two substances also have the EC numbers:
    250-863-4
    257-187-9

    If you put Lyral into a product you have to declare it on the label, as it is one of the 26 allergens regulated by the EU, but when you do that you have to use the INCI name, which is:
    Hydroxyisohexyl 3-Cyclohexene Carboxaldehyde
    and that has the CAS number:
    31906-04-4 (as though it was just the ‘3’ version)

    Now if you put 'Lyral IUPAC' into Google the top result is from ChemIndustry indicating it has another CAS number:
    68411-90-5

    While if you look it up on Wikipedea you find that chemical details are given, including the IUPAC name
    4-(4-hydroxy-4-methylpentyl)-1-cyclohex-3-enecarboxaldehyde (as though it was just the ‘4’ version)
    plus CAS number 31906-04-4 and EC number 250-863-4 (as though it was just the ‘3’ version)
    As well as a list of other names under which it is sold:
    Lyral, Kovanol, Mugonal, Landolal

    Which, strikingly to me, does not include the name used by my own supplier, and under which it is listed by The Good Scents Company which is Leeral

    If I were to attempt to reconcile all that stuff for every entry I’d have failed in my objective to produce a simplified reference summary, so in the end I decided that the best quality, most complete information for the widest range of materials seemed to be that included in The Good Scents Company pages: hence my decision that links there would be useful.

    How the ordinary consumer is expected to make any sense out of all this is a mystery!
    Last edited by Chris Bartlett; 4th February 2012 at 11:51 AM. Reason: added quotation marks to clarify the Google search
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
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    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

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    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
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  9. #39

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Some from my collection but it's on the fragrance concentrate. I think they are not on the list.

    bornylacetate 9% of concentrate
    terpineol alpha 30% of concentrate
    ethyl butyrate 8% of concentrate
    anisaldehyde 10% of concentrate
    galbex 183 6% of concentrate
    benzyl propionate 10% of concentrate
    styrallyl acetate 5% of concentrate

    Please check and adjust or let me know if editing is required.
    Last edited by princeOK; 4th February 2012 at 03:32 PM.

  10. #40

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Right, another update to the OP just completed - I’ve added Dimethyl anthranilate, Estragole, Methyl β-naphthyl ketone, Methyl eugenol, Musk indane and Safranal.

    This update completes all the non-QRA Restricted Standards. It also really shows that those who said I should make the list complete were right, because it includes two of the most important and difficult standards (in bold). I’m going to add lists of the natural materials containing these somewhere: I think it might be most useful to put them into the same post with the Eugenol list for ease of reference later.

    There are still most of the specification standards left - not quite sure how best to handle those as they are not so easily summarised - and there are also quite a few Prohibited Standards left to add (all the natural materials are in, but not all the synthetics).

    This has turned into rather an epic task!
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

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    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
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  11. #41
    Super Member otocione's Avatar
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Chris, my message was just to suggest users to use as well CAS numbers because they are useful, I wasn't suggesting you to put it in your list, as it would be actually too much work as you say!!
    As for the problems you reported about CAS, actually it is a precise and unambiguous method of classification if we consider the exact molecule. The problem arises from the fact that often chemicals are given common or commercial names which can be not precise and create confusion as you describe (the matter with lyral is that as you said two chemically different molecules, which have obviously two different CAS, are called both lyral, or leeral; the third CAS you cited is an error of that site because that number turns out to correspond to Hexanedinitrile).
    I suggest everyone to use Sigma-Aldrich site for their searches about chemicals, it's a precise source of information and there you are sure to find the correct CAS
    Sebastiano - Organic Chemist

  12. #42

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    The Sigma Aldrich tip is useful, thanks. Yes I realise the CAS numbers are precise for their purpose: if you buy materials direct from the big manufacturers you always get CAS numbers quoted too.

    The whole thing is still very confusing to those of us without the organic chemistry background!
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

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    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
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  13. #43
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    The whole thing is still very confusing to those of us without the organic chemistry background!
    I know, I hope I didn't enhance the confusion, my tip had the opposite purpose: facilitate the identification of chemicals by using a mean which is different from the long annoying chemical names Anyhow, it's good to know there's this possibility, just in case!
    Sebastiano - Organic Chemist

  14. #44

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    No, no - not at all - I appreciate the idea and link. Once I have the Good Scents links there the CAS number is another thing that can be picked up from them. I can’t be sure how reliable they are for those, not having checked a meaningful sized sample, but pretty much anything else on those pages that I’ve ever cross-checked has turned out to be accurate so it should be - and for Lyral they give full chemical details, including both correct CAS numbers, for both the variants that are present in the commercial product.

    I think we are slowly building up a really useful resource here.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
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    Chris Bartlett
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    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
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  15. #45
    Super Member otocione's Avatar
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    I think we are slowly building up a really useful resource here.
    I agree
    About Lyral I was wondering: is the commercial product containing both the molecules or is it just the same name for two slightly different products each one with one molecule?
    Sebastiano - Organic Chemist

  16. #46

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    I’m not quite certain because I don’t know how the stuff is made, but from my reading of some of MSDS and the EU papers on the subject I believe all the commercial products contain both molecules, presumably either because the mix is desirable or because they are both made in the production process and there is no commercial incentive to separate them.
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  17. #47
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    thank you,

    the original post is getting better and better.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    There are still most of the specification standards left - not quite sure how best to handle those as they are not so easily summarised - and there are also quite a few Prohibited Standards left to add (all the natural materials are in, but not all the synthetics).
    what is the problem with these specification standards, could you give an example? i would like to think it over if that could be of any help, and i am sure many others feel this way too.

    maybe in the meanwhile you could start with the prohibited synthetics?

    please do keep up the good work, it surely is appreciated. and thankfully the mods have taken note, and made this thing sticky. :)

  18. #48
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    This has turned into rather an epic task!
    don't bite off more than you can chew (in dutch we say something about stacking too much hay on ones fork, which evokes funny images to my mind).

    personally, i would rather see the list complete than a summary of all the naturals that contain the restricted ingredients. don't get me wrong; such a list would be nothing less than great, but if you feel it's becoming too much i think you should leave that part out for now.

    and you surely should get something like a medal pinned to your user profile when you manage to accomplish all this. ;)

  19. #49
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    As I can deduce by the IFRA website the specification standars include few materials but they are a little bit more complex to understand, not being just a number but an explaination of particular cases.
    E.g. "Allyl esters should only be used when the level of free allylalcohol in the ester is less than 0.1%. This recommendation is based on the delayed irritant potential of allylalcohol"
    I don't know if this is what Chris meant to say but still it's one possibile issue.
    Sebastiano - Organic Chemist

  20. #50

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Quote Originally Posted by otocione View Post
    As I can deduce by the IFRA website the specification standars include few materials but they are a little bit more complex to understand, not being just a number but an explaination of particular cases.
    E.g. "Allyl esters should only be used when the level of free allylalcohol in the ester is less than 0.1%. This recommendation is based on the delayed irritant potential of allylalcohol"
    I don't know if this is what Chris meant to say but still it's one possibile issue.
    Yes that is the sort of thing I meant - I’ve oversimplified the Cade and Birch Tar ones in order to essentially turn them back into a number, but some of the standards talk about production methods.

    Take this one on Vetiveryl acetate for example:

    Acetylated vetiver oil (Vetiveryl acetate) should only be used as a fragrance ingredient if produced by methods that lead to a reduction in allergenic materials, like the ones outlined below (acetylation methods using acetic anhydride):
    - without catalyst, at a temperature not exceeding 120įC
    - with ortho phosphoric acid at room temperature
    - with sodium acetate in toluene at reflux temperature
    The first two products can be used in their crude form after the usual procedures, but may be further purified. In the last case, distillation is necessary. Another method accepted is an enzymatic acetylation process.
    This recommendation is based on test results of RIFM with samples prepared according to different acetylation methods (private communication to IFRA).
    I can’t see any obvious way of summarising that without rendering it meaningless, yet Vetiveryl acetate is a very commonly used ingredient so I’m loath to miss it out.
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  21. #51
    Super Member otocione's Avatar
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Actually it's complicated but there's no way to make it simpler. I don't know maybe we could just put the direct link to the IFRA pdf of any specification so that it's easily accessible, then if anybody needs help, that's why we are here
    If someone has a better idea it would be definitely welcome!
    Sebastiano - Organic Chemist

  22. #52
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    i think it would be the most simple to just list them with the others, with a short note of the matter *, plus either a link or a footnote.

    material, problem, reference.

    in that way, you keep the list readable, just one line per item. all in one place.

    the reference could then exist in the form of a more extensive listing with either full or simplified data below the main alphabetic summary list. this could possibly be divided under headers of certain case types (i do not know whether many are shared or not) alphabetic, or whatever makes the most sense (i do not know what these cases are).

    alternatively (less work) a link to the original data should do it as well, provided they keep the information on the same page over time. a bunch of broken links would be a terrible waste of valuable work.

    and while not everyone would understand everything, at least it's there and you can always find out more, one way or the other. ask the suppliers, ask here on the forum, google some terms, and so on. diy-ers tend to be resourceful. :)

    *) the vetiveryl acetate case, for instance, could be described without giving any detail. it's good enough to know that they demand a type with allergens reduced, for a start. provide a pointer to additional detailed information, and it's all great.

    i hope this helps.

  23. #53
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    @gido the links at IFRA site may change as they update the information on regular basis, so it would be necessary to check occasionally their validity
    Sebastiano - Organic Chemist

  24. #54

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    OK thanks for the thoughts guys - I’ve just finished adding Versalide, several new links, colour coding and references to Specification Standards. I’ve gone for a combination of:

    the Good Scents link - so far they are reproducing the specification in their material data for everything I’ve linked that has a standard.

    A generic link to the list of Specification Standards on the IFRA site - hopefully that link should be stable even if the individual pdf links change.

    To make them stand out more I’ve also colour coded the *, ~ and ‘prohibited’ notes.

    To be continued . . .
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
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  25. #55
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    WONDERFUL
    Sebastiano - Organic Chemist

  26. #56

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Another update - I’ve now added a detailed explanation of the IFRA Categories so that you can see exactly what is included in the Category 4 numbers given in the main table as well as what would fall into all the other categories if you want to look something up. It took me hours of searching to find this information on the IFRA site the first time I needed it, so I thought it useful to include.

    Also note that there are a range of products in Category 11 for which the majority of the standards simply state ‘Not Restricted'
    Last edited by Chris Bartlett; 8th June 2012 at 04:53 PM. Reason: minor corrections
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  27. #57

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Wow Chris! Thank you for your diligence. This is a huge undertaking and I hope people realize the work you have had to put into this. I don't work with aromachem's, only naturals and this is really fantasic.

    Thanks, Tracy
    It isn't happiness that makes us grateful, but gratitude that makes us happy.

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  28. #58
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Fantastic guide! This thread gets better each time I look at it.

  29. #59
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    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    Given the restrictions around all these, I'm guessing we'll see a lot of creative work in Category 11 in these next few years.

  30. #60

    Default Re: IFRA Standards - a summary

    I strongly suspect that’s one of the reasons we’ve seen an explosion in sales of reed diffusers in the last year or two. Now, far from being the poor-relations of the home fragrance business you can get some really excellent ones.

    The relaxed restrictions are certainly one of the reasons I decided to launch my own range: sometimes making a skin-fragrance you feel as though you’re running with a sack of lead - so it’s nice to put it down and run free every now and then!
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