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  1. #1

    Default how do you get the best from a candle?

    I am fed up of buying candles, only to throw them away because the wick has burnt, but at least 30% of the wax is still around the sides of the container. Has anyone got any advice towards getting the most from candles?

    (side note: i saw a honey chocolate candle yesterday, thought it was amazing, but didn't make the purchase because of my wax waste issues)

  2. #2

    Default Re: how do you get the best from a candle?

    I use a candle warmer after I no longer want to light it. Then, once the scent is about gone, I pour out the spent wax, dispose of it, and while the container is still very warm I use paper towels to wipe out the wax that didn't pour out and quickly peel off the label. Remaining adhesive and wax residue is then easily removed from the warm glass with some oil, salt and one of those green scrubby pads. After removing the oil by washing it with plain ole soap and water I have a drinking glass, vase, sample catcher or whatever.

    http://www.gd-wholesale.com/userimg/...034-18-369.jpg
    Last edited by socalwoman; 29th January 2012 at 02:23 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: how do you get the best from a candle?

    The advice I had (from Linda Pilkington at Ormonde Jayne) is
    1) Trim the wick short (leave only enough to light - 1/4 inch) and trim it again before every lighting
    2) Whenever you light it, leave the candle to burn for long enough that you have a complete layer of molten wax on the surface (i.e. no solid crust at the sides).
    3) Keep the sides clean of smoky dirt.
    4) Keep away from draughts or it will burn unevenly.
    This works for Ormonde Jayne candles which normally burn to nothing. Though the glass isn't much use afterwards as it has Ormonde Jayne printed all over it.

    I used to work for a magazine and we printed advice for readers to freeze candles before use - they will burn more slowly. I haven't tried this and it probably isn't the point of a scented candle, but I do know on that occasion we had a lot of reader complaints because it was Christmas, and the gold/silver finish on most candles flakes off if you put them in the freezer.

  4. #4
    hednic's Avatar
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    Default Re: how do you get the best from a candle?

    That's good advice. I'll need to remember that. I usually take a knife and knock the excess wax off the side of the glass so that it all collects around the wick. It's a pain, but the candle lasts longer and I don't feel I'm throwing away my money that quickly.

  5. #5

    Default Re: how do you get the best from a candle?

    Thanks for the advice. I will try what's written

  6. #6

    Default Re: how do you get the best from a candle?

    I always make sure to trim the wick so that its not extraordinarily long.

    for swap/sale:





  7. #7

    Default Re: how do you get the best from a candle?

    Madaba's advice is great. You should follow all of it (and particularly the part about trimming the wick before lighting and only lighting when you have enough time to let the candle burn edge to edge) But I take one more step to get full life out of my candles.

    If I still have wax in the container after the wick has burned away completely, I will remelt the wax and add a new wick. I do this in one of two ways depending on the container. One option is to place the container in a small pot of water on the stove and turn the heat on low. The water level should be slightly above the level of the remaining wax in the container, but should not be so high as to allow water to enter the container. That would ruin the wax. Be careful with the heat. If you turn the heat up too high or if the water becomes hot too quickly, you risk cracking the container. And if the water reaches boiling, turn the heat off completely and let the hot water do all the work. Once the wax is fully melted, drop in a new wick (take care to center the wick), allow the wax to cool and completely harden over the next two hours, and then trim the wick to within 1/4" of the surface of the wax with a pair of scissors. If you have a lot of wax, you may find you have nearly 1/3 of a candle remaining and once the wax hardens, your candle will look almost as good as new, with a smooth, creamy surface.

    Another option is to scrape out the remaining wax, place the wax in a Pyrex measuring cup in a pot of boiling water (basically using the Pyrex cup as a double boiler), and then repour the wax into the original container with a new wick once it is melted. You can also pour the wax into tealight containers if you prefer.

    If you want to go the tealight path, simply buy a pack of inexpensive, unscented tealights, remove the tealight candle from the tealight tin, remove the wax from around the wick, (so now you have just an empty tealight tin with a wick sitting in the center) and pour your candle wax into the empty tealight containers. Now you can use that great, expensive candle fragrance in any container you like.

    Wicking a candle is a science. Finding the perfect wick for any given wax type in any given candle size takes much research. But I find that an HTP 73 prewaxed wick works reasonably well with most regular sized (Diptyque sized) containers. These wicks come with a base attached and usually run about 10 cents US each and can be found at craft stores and on eBay. Well worth the tiny 10 cent investment if you purchase a lot of high end candles.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: how do you get the best from a candle?

    Quote Originally Posted by madaba View Post
    The advice I had (from Linda Pilkington at Ormonde Jayne) is
    1) Trim the wick short (leave only enough to light - 1/4 inch) and trim it again before every lighting
    2) Whenever you light it, leave the candle to burn for long enough that you have a complete layer of molten wax on the surface (i.e. no solid crust at the sides).
    3) Keep the sides clean of smoky dirt.
    4) Keep away from draughts or it will burn unevenly.
    This works for Ormonde Jayne candles which normally burn to nothing. Though the glass isn't much use afterwards as it has Ormonde Jayne printed all over it.

    I used to work for a magazine and we printed advice for readers to freeze candles before use - they will burn more slowly. I haven't tried this and it probably isn't the point of a scented candle, but I do know on that occasion we had a lot of reader complaints because it was Christmas, and the gold/silver finish on most candles flakes off if you put them in the freezer.
    this is good stuff i learned alot
    1. Dior Homme Original
    2. Musc Ravaguer
    3. Portrait of a Lady
    4. Noir de Noir
    5. L Instant Guerlain pour Homme Extreme
    6. New Haarlem
    7. Pure Coffee
    8. Blu Mediterraneo Sicilian Almond
    9. Rose 31
    10. Spiritueuse Double Vanille

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