Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1

    Default Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    often describe it as "strong and musky?"

    This is something I've found baffling. On at least half a dozen different times, different women, each with varying degrees of interest in perfume, smell a scent they don't like and either say it's "too strong," "too musky," or both. Regardless of the strength or presence of musk.

    Has anyone else witnessed this?

    Obviously I have my ideas. Any scent you think is unpleasant and is suddenly assaulting your olfactory sense will seem "too strong," I guess. And I think people tend to confuse "musky" with "musty," so anything that smells like an older scent (not the vanilla-laced gooiness or fruity-floral frothy concoctions shelled out from VS and BBW) gets associated with something old and musty and then called "musky."

    What general terms have you heard misapplied to scents when people don't like them?

  2. #2
    hednic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    McLean, NYC, & B˙zios
    Posts
    78,541

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    Not necessarily misapplied, but I often hear: generic, boring and heavy. Have used them at times myself for unpleasant scents.

  3. #3
    Hillaire
    Guest

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    I have always understood it as a misnomer for 'musTy'. Many of us actually understand musk to be a 'cleaner' smell. But when I 'hear' it (musky) employed as an aspersion, it seems like often people are implying it's somehow dirty or dank.
    Could be wrong.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    Soapy seems to come up sometimes forgetting the fact that most soaps are perfumed.

    I've also witnessed "bug spray" comments but really, what do you expect when you pump a few sprays on a card and shove it (still dripping) under your nose!?

    Oh, and I agree with your comments re "musky" not actually meaning musky at all.

  5. #5
    teardrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    The south of England
    Posts
    5,787
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    l agree with the interpretation of "musty" as "musky", ie. something that's rather retro or classic in style.

    l have also noticed some basenoters (particularly newer members) describe perfumes they like as "musky" as well, even though those perfumes have no musk notes in them at all, & are not even classic-style perfumes. l am not sure what they mean by this, but perhaps they interpret notes like amber as "musky", because they meld so well with that person's natural skin odour? Just my theory.
    "What is this secret connection between the soul, and sea, clouds and perfumes? The soul itself appears to be sea, cloud and perfume..." - from Zorba the Greek by Nikos Kazantzakis.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    I think people are simply using terms wrongly.

    If one of our more skilled members claimed a scent was very musky I'd almost immediately believe it. But if a person who appears claims to be relatively new claims that I'll doubt it.

    for swap/sale:





  7. #7

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    Yes, I agree with everyone who's noticed the frequent confusion between musKy and musTy. MusTy is associated with damp basements, unaired cupboards, everything old and neglected, therefore it's used as a word for "bad". Nobody wants to smell like that. But some people dislike musKy smells as well, using the term correctly, I think because of the association between musky scents and detergent perfumes, especially in the US. I love the smell of musk and I take it as a compliment if someone says I smell musKy, but maybe I have to rethink that now!

  8. #8

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by Hillaire View Post
    I have always understood it as a misnomer for 'musTy'. Many of us actually understand musk to be a 'cleaner' smell. But when I 'hear' it (musky) employed as an aspersion, it seems like often people are implying it's somehow dirty or dank.
    Could be wrong.
    I think Hillaire has summed this up pretty well. Another explanation: I think people often make the association with musk as an animal essence and then assume -since it is an animal essence- it must be the heavy, dark, cloying aspect in fragrances they dislike. Recently, I was talking fragrances with a colleague and she mentioned her dislike of "musky" perfumes. As the conversation went on, it dawned on me that what she thought of as "musk" was actually a fragrance muddied with heavy patchouli.

    I must admit, I still marvel at the fact that an animal essence can create a clean scent!

  9. #9

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    Well it depends, it could be to sweet, to musky, harsh. For me it cant be to spicy, if it is i hate it.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    I describe a scent I do not like buy saying it is plasticky, smells like a science experiment gone wrong or incomplete fragrance or synthetic mess
    "Nature and all her wonders guide me...Emotions find expression in fragrance. Fragrance is the music of my dreams. Fragrance is my inspiration." - Annick Goutal

  11. #11

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    Another phrase that is commonly used is old man or old woman scent.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    One of the least usual unfavorable comments I ever got on a fragrance was: "too Oriental" and even "too salty".

  13. #13

    Default Re: Why do people who dislike a scent . . .

    Quote Originally Posted by redrose View Post
    MusTy is associated with damp basements, unaired cupboards, everything old and neglected, therefore it's used as a word for "bad". Nobody wants to smell like that.
    Speak for yourself, my dear

    Not sure abour unaired cupboards, but 'damp basements, everything old and neglected' can also describe some aspects of vetiver, moss and darker patchouli bases and some leathers . . . also musty, forest floorish etc. I think it's quite common for kids to use 'musky, musty and old man/woman' etc. for anything that predates the calone and 'fresh' driven 90's.

    Dans Tes Bras and Onda both have immediate and very positive connotations of the basement in my childhood home in NZ - dry, cool soil and exposed rock that hasn't seen sunlight for years underneath the wooden structural beams. Musty, earthy, organic, compelling, mysterious and not unpleasant at all. (No accounting for taste, right?).

    I think the 'musky' thing is basically a combination of inexperience with classic perfumery and poor descriptive skills . . . no big deal and as hedonist says, relatively easy to see where the poster is coming from.

Similar Threads

  1. So I let 2 fragrance uneducated people pick my scent for evening
    By dreamer81 in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 29th August 2012, 09:52 PM
  2. Do people stop smelling their own scent after a while?
    By kewart in forum Female Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 22nd November 2010, 06:14 PM
  3. If i dislike Narcisso Rod. Musc will i dislike the edt
    By jdnba in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 28th January 2008, 01:47 PM
  4. lol... Are you like me when people ask about your scent...
    By J.Riv in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: 28th October 2007, 11:17 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 3rd September 2007, 07:46 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •