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  1. #1
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    Default Fragrance Expiry

    Ok so I was in the fragrance section of The Bay recently and somehow I got on the subject of expiry with a sales associate. She told me that fragrances go bad between 3 and 5 years after they are produced, regardless of storage conditions. Now, this made me very nervous. But then I started having some doubts about what she told me, because I realized that many of you guys own over 100 bottles. And it would be absolutely foolish to have any more than 10 or so if you would have to throw them out and replace them every 3 years. So can you guys give me the truth with regards to fragrance expiry? Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default

    If you store the bottles correctly, in their box in a dark, cool environment, they will last for many years to come.

    Sunlight is the death of many fine fragrances unfortunately.

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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    Quote Originally Posted by Apep View Post
    If you store the bottles correctly, in their box in a dark, cool environment, they will last for many years to come.

    Sunlight is the death of many fine fragrances unfortunately.
    I store mine in a dark closet, so sunlight is not an issue. But when you say "cool," what temperature are we talking about? Mine are just at room temperature.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    This is a free translation from Les Sens du Parfum by Guy Robert regarding storage. The author is a highly respected perfumer, who was literally brought up among the greatest noses of the 20th century. He is the creator of such classics as Madame Rochas, Dioressence, Calèche, and Equipage, and is also one of the founders of the ISIPCA perfume school and the Osmothèque in Versailles. --------------------------------



    When someone offers you a perfume, may you be lucky enough to receive a true parfum (instead of an eau) in a beautiful, large bottle. Chances are you will fall in love with it, and that you will want to replace it at some point. A valuable advise, in that case, is to purchase the smaller bottle. Depending on your perfume habits, a "half ounce" or "one ounce" will suffice. Larger volumes will obviously take many more months to finish; but while a well-made perfume can stand the test of time, age does'nt give it any interesting qualities either. Once you have opened the bottle, a light oxydation process takes place inside. If you forget to close the bottle after you have used the perfume, this will only speed up the process. The fresh, fleeting top notes of the fragrance will tend to "calm down" a bit; it's true that this will not completely ruin the fragrance, but it will change the initial impression you get from your perfume. When the natural ingredients are derived from such noble raw materials as jasmin, orange blossom, jonquil, and rose, the colour will become slightly browner. Depending on the composition of the perfume, it can develop into a brownish-red within a few years. If it has a green teint, that green may become darker. This is normal, and it does not necessarily mean that the fragrance is deteriorated. However, when you purchase a new bottle of the same perfume, you may get the impression that they sold you a lighter, more fleeting fragrance. This phenomenon causes many customers to take their new bottle back to the store, claiming it is not the same; hence, manufacturers are asked on a regular basis to analyse and check recently purchased bottles in their laboratories. The ageing process is increased when you add light and heat. Don't keep your perfume on the bathroom shelve, which is often located near a radiator: your interior decorator may say it looks fabulous, but it's really the wrong place for perfumes. If, on top of that, you expose the bottle to direct sunlight, you have done all you can to kill the fragrance. Remember that the sun is a perfume's greatest enemy. At the Osmothèque, the fragrance library in Versailles, classic and discontinued fragrances are kept in a cellar at a constant temperature, all through summer and winter. This cellar is completely dark; our perfume reserves are protected by means of argon, a gas heavier than air, which keeps the top of the bottles and jars inert. That way, the liquid does not come in contact with air. A new bottle of parfum of which the cap has not yet been removed (it's even better if the bottle was stored in its packaging) can be kept, depending on its composition, from fifteen to twenty years. Bare in mind, though, that perfumes with orange blossom, jonquil, and its derivates as their main ingredients will age faster and will turn red, while those composed around jasmin, rose, and iris will change less. In each perfume, some molecules react with others, and then transform rather quickly; these are usually chemical reactions between natural and synthetic elements, which can produce undesired esters. The only natural product which doesn't age well is patchouli: two years after it has been mixed with other (natural or synthetic) products, chemical reactions transform its beautiful and rich scent in an inevitable "celluloid-like" odour. More and more perfumes contain patchouli nowadays; they do not necessarily become unwearable, but their character does change a little bit through time.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    sunlight is one thing, if you place your bottle in your car and drive around, turn the heater on in the winter, it can expire in one day. And this may be out of your control too since when you buy a fragrance online, you don't know where it has been in what conditions.

    There was a store where i tested out designer fragrances recently, almost all of them were weak with lots of alcohol smell including One Million, only a few didn't have it, le male and dior homme.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    maybe try decanting the whole bottle to another one and adding oil to it to prolong its life.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    Quote Originally Posted by socalwoman View Post
    This is a free translation from Les Sens du Parfum by Guy Robert regarding storage. The author is a highly respected perfumer, who was literally brought up among the greatest noses of the 20th century. He is the creator of such classics as Madame Rochas, Dioressence, Calèche, and Equipage, and is also one of the founders of the ISIPCA perfume school and the Osmothèque in Versailles. --------------------------------



    When someone offers you a perfume, may you be lucky enough to receive a true parfum (instead of an eau) in a beautiful, large bottle. Chances are you will fall in love with it, and that you will want to replace it at some point. A valuable advise, in that case, is to purchase the smaller bottle. Depending on your perfume habits, a "half ounce" or "one ounce" will suffice. Larger volumes will obviously take many more months to finish; but while a well-made perfume can stand the test of time, age does'nt give it any interesting qualities either. Once you have opened the bottle, a light oxydation process takes place inside. If you forget to close the bottle after you have used the perfume, this will only speed up the process. The fresh, fleeting top notes of the fragrance will tend to "calm down" a bit; it's true that this will not completely ruin the fragrance, but it will change the initial impression you get from your perfume. When the natural ingredients are derived from such noble raw materials as jasmin, orange blossom, jonquil, and rose, the colour will become slightly browner. Depending on the composition of the perfume, it can develop into a brownish-red within a few years. If it has a green teint, that green may become darker. This is normal, and it does not necessarily mean that the fragrance is deteriorated. However, when you purchase a new bottle of the same perfume, you may get the impression that they sold you a lighter, more fleeting fragrance. This phenomenon causes many customers to take their new bottle back to the store, claiming it is not the same; hence, manufacturers are asked on a regular basis to analyse and check recently purchased bottles in their laboratories. The ageing process is increased when you add light and heat. Don't keep your perfume on the bathroom shelve, which is often located near a radiator: your interior decorator may say it looks fabulous, but it's really the wrong place for perfumes. If, on top of that, you expose the bottle to direct sunlight, you have done all you can to kill the fragrance. Remember that the sun is a perfume's greatest enemy. At the Osmothèque, the fragrance library in Versailles, classic and discontinued fragrances are kept in a cellar at a constant temperature, all through summer and winter. This cellar is completely dark; our perfume reserves are protected by means of argon, a gas heavier than air, which keeps the top of the bottles and jars inert. That way, the liquid does not come in contact with air. A new bottle of parfum of which the cap has not yet been removed (it's even better if the bottle was stored in its packaging) can be kept, depending on its composition, from fifteen to twenty years. Bare in mind, though, that perfumes with orange blossom, jonquil, and its derivates as their main ingredients will age faster and will turn red, while those composed around jasmin, rose, and iris will change less. In each perfume, some molecules react with others, and then transform rather quickly; these are usually chemical reactions between natural and synthetic elements, which can produce undesired esters. The only natural product which doesn't age well is patchouli: two years after it has been mixed with other (natural or synthetic) products, chemical reactions transform its beautiful and rich scent in an inevitable "celluloid-like" odour. More and more perfumes contain patchouli nowadays; they do not necessarily become unwearable, but their character does change a little bit through time.
    Thanks for that, very interesting!
    Kurt smells like Teen Spirit

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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    Quote Originally Posted by blackmilk View Post
    Ok so I was in the fragrance section of The Bay recently and somehow I got on the subject of expiry with a sales associate. She told me that fragrances go bad between 3 and 5 years after they are produced, regardless of storage conditions. Now, this made me very nervous. But then I started having some doubts about what she told me, because I realized that many of you guys own over 100 bottles. And it would be absolutely foolish to have any more than 10 or so if you would have to throw them out and replace them every 3 years. So can you guys give me the truth with regards to fragrance expiry? Thanks.
    I agree, it's refreshing to see that you're an individual thinker who doesn't just listen to what sales associates say (like me) lol. I just figure that if there's a vintage fragrance market that features scents from 50+ years ago, and people still want them, surely they don't just go bad and are at least wearable.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    Quote Originally Posted by Apep View Post
    If you store the bottles correctly, in their box in a dark, cool environment, they will last for many years to come.
    Absolutely

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    Quote Originally Posted by hednic View Post
    Absolutely
    What constitutes a cool environment though? Is room temperature ok?

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    imo, if you store the bottles correctly, in a dark, cool and dry environment, they will last for many years. Sunlight and heat is what you should be worry about. Also I have a bottle that I've had 10+ yrs and it stills smells good

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    Quote Originally Posted by socalwoman View Post
    This is a free translation from Les Sens du Parfum by Guy Robert regarding storage.....
    a wonderfully informative post .... THANK YOU socalwoman !!!

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    Quote Originally Posted by socalwoman View Post
    This is a free translation from Les Sens du Parfum by Guy Robert regarding storage. The author is a highly respected perfumer, who was literally brought up among the greatest noses of the 20th century. He is the creator of such classics as Madame Rochas, Dioressence, Calèche, and Equipage, and is also one of the founders of the ISIPCA perfume school and the Osmothèque in Versailles.
    Nice article! I've learnt alot from here
    Current Top 5:
    1. Frederic Malle L'eau d'Hiver
    2. Tom Ford Noir de Noir
    3. Dior Homme / Dior Homme Intense
    4. Thierry Mugler A*Men Pure Havane / Pure Malt
    5. Creed Aventus / Tom Ford Tobacco Vanille

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    Thanks for all the info so far! Can anyone answer this, though?

    Quote Originally Posted by blackmilk View Post
    What constitutes a cool environment though? Is room temperature ok?

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    imo room temp is fine. Mine are stored around 25C in a cabinet.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Fragrance Expiry

    I agree, it's refreshing to see that you're an individual thinker who doesn't just listen to what sales associates say (like me) lol. I just figure that if there's a vintage fragrance market that features scents from 50+ years ago, and people still want them, surely they don't just go bad and are at least wearable.

    Ditto. If the vintage bottles are good enough for the true blue die hard collectors, then they are good enough for me!

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