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  1. #1

    Default Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Sometimes it's good to rub a fragrance in. For example, the Patou Pour Homme thread got me curious about my Bijan Men, which supposedly smells like PPH. However, Bijan is too strong to just spray, so I sprayed one spray on my arm then rubbed it in both arms vigorously spreading it all around. It's tone down, more tolerable and much better smelling this way.

    Rubbing it in sort of leap frogs you to the mid / dry down, which is often a good thing.

  2. #2
    hednic's Avatar
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I've spoken to a few people who also do that with some scents and they say the same thing you do.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Al is correct, but he is wrong about the reason why it's bad. Roja Dove actually said that the friction caused by rubbing it in causes the top notes to evaporate. Most people know that already. However, he also said that by rubbing you actually cover the fragrance with the oils on your skin. So you kind of form a layer over the fragrance, but I guess that's a good thing with a really really strong fragrance.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Meh, that's one of Al's trademarks. Technically, he is right if friction kills topnotes a bit. Sure, in cases this may be desirable, but he's not wrong per se. Either way, I find his videos awesome. Love his enthusiasm.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Who cares I love to hear him say it Makes me giggle
    He enjoys fragrances and that's all that should matter
    No rights or wrongs that's what makes fragrances great it's what you like and however u want to use them
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I never intentionally rub my fragrances. Why would you do that?
    If you do not like a scent from the get-go, just try to find another to your liking.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by dollars&scents View Post
    I never intentionally rub my fragrances. Why would you do that?
    If you do not like a scent from the get-go, just try to find another to your liking.
    My same sentiments.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I stand in front of a mirror. Spray. Rub. Rub some more. Rub just a bit more. Spray again.
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  9. #9

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I think it's easier and better to spray on the chest and then just blow on that area while trying not to breathe in the top notes. That way, you get a little of the top notes but you avoid olfactory fatigue and can deal with frags that have massive openings.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by SculptureOfSoul View Post
    I stand in front of a mirror. Spray. Rub. Rub some more. Rub just a bit more. Spray again.
    Yeahhh BABY !!!
    Rub it in, Biaatttccchhhh

    On a more serious note I do sometimes rub my frags in, in case I want to walk past the top notes faster and get to the mid and base faster........just a FYI TIP

    For instance I hate the top notes of Habit Rouge so in testing and using it, I tried rubbing it in and the sharp floral top evaporated a bit faster that way. I still disliked the frag though ..... sighhh
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  11. #11

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I wouldn't say it "kills the molecules", rather it may reduce some of the aromatic chemicals used to make the top notes project the way that they do. Which in some cases, it's favorable, due to sickening, cloying, overly chemical, etc, type top notes.

  12. #12
    Dependent mesaboogie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I respect that.
    "I am a robot and I like cheese"

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  13. #13

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I always thought rubbing it in gets u to the mid notes faster. So if u hate the top, rub rub rub!

  14. #14

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I do enjoy his enthusiasm in the street scents videos, but I can only take so much of him saying the exact same thing every time.

    I mean....what does "It kills the molecules" mean? That line doesn't really make sense.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by starshipvelcro View Post
    I do enjoy his enthusiasm in the street scents videos, but I can only take so much of him saying the exact same thing every time.

    I mean....what does "It kills the molecules" mean? That line doesn't really make sense.
    Yup. I'm not a chemistry major, but saying something like, "rubbing the fragrance spreads the molecules out more so they outgas or evaporate more quickly" seems simple and way more accurate.
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  16. #16

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by mesaboogie View Post
    I respect that.
    lol

  17. #17

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by jamwires View Post
    lol
    The question is WHY would you rub it in? I never felt the need to do that. If I dislike the top notes that much, I will not wear the fragrance..

  18. #18

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by SculptureOfSoul View Post
    I stand in front of a mirror. Spray. Rub. Rub some more. Rub just a bit more. Spray again.

    Amouage Reflection Man?

  19. #19
    Basenotes Junkie Sidney_Falco's Avatar
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by Tropics View Post
    Amouage Reflection Man?

  20. #20
    DIRTYDUNNZ
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Generally, one should not rub in fragrance, but allow it to develop. However, Roja Dove states that rubbing it in is fine, only in combination with a moisturizer. My experience is that rubbing with moisturizer tends to mute the fragrance. I prefer to layer it by first rubbing with moisturizer, then spraying the fragrance for the final layer. This should not be done with all fragrances, as some are too strong. To Al's credit, the whole "kills the molecules" thing might be just a colloquialism. It would be more accurate to say that it kills the opening. However, it depends on how hard someone rubs. Nevertheless, it's still a good rule of thumb.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by DIRTYDUNNZ View Post
    Generally, one should not rub in fragrance, but allow it to develop. However, Roja Dove states that rubbing it in is fine, only in combination with a moisturizer. My experience is that rubbing with moisturizer tends to mute the fragrance. I prefer to layer it by first rubbing with moisturizer, then spraying the fragrance for the final layer. This should not be done with all fragrances, as some are too strong. To Al's credit, the whole "kills the molecules" thing might be just a colloquialism. It would be more accurate to say that it kills the opening. However, it depends on how hard someone rubs. Nevertheless, it's still a good rule of thumb.
    I respect that ^

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    BTW Al is a boss, Street Scents FTW.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    In the A-Z Guide, TS says that it doesn't "crush the notes" or "break the molecules" or any other leap of faith in physics. What rubbing does do is spread the liquid more thinly across the skin, making a larger, thinner coating which can evaporate or be absorbed more quickly. Rubbing with some exertion will also raise the temperature, due to friction. Either way, all you're doing is mitigating the top/middle of the frag.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    There's was a woman on one of his video's that was a ninja rubber inner and got away with it. You could tell that she knew it was wrong and did it really fast when he turned his back to her and faced the camera. Half the fun of his video's are seeing if they can get away with it. Al's great!

  25. #25

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Seems like everyone is in agreement that rubbing a fragrance in prompts a loss in top and/ or mid notes. Al's opinion, as he expresses in HIS videos, is simply that one should experience the entirety of a fragrance. Is this thread, which title reads that he is WRONG, really fair to him? As fragrance lovers, can we truly say he is WRONG for wanting someone to experience the entirety of a fragrance? Lay off the guy.

  26. #26

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    He made a street scents video recently (past couple of months I think) where a guy who was into essential oils was the guest. The guy that was into essential oils rubbed it in slightly. Al asked why and told him why you shouldn't. The essential oil guy disagreed and gave his reason why. Check it out on youtube.

    I agree with Al BUT I do think that if you don't like the top notes OR if you are using a essential oil or something that has a single note or two, then rubbing may be a good thing.

  27. #27
    Dependent mesaboogie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I haven't noticed any difference when rubbing my wrists together or not. The top notes didn't magically disappear and the longevity wasn't affected. The only difference was that I saved a spray by not spraying both wrists. I think dabbing your wrists together is a good compromise.
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  28. #28

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by gmm150 View Post
    He made a street scents video recently (past couple of months I think) where a guy who was into essential oils was the guest. The guy that was into essential oils rubbed it in slightly. Al asked why and told him why you shouldn't. The essential oil guy disagreed and gave his reason why. Check it out on youtube.

    I agree with Al BUT I do think that if you don't like the top notes OR if you are using a essential oil or something that has a single note or two, then rubbing may be a good thing.
    Yeah it was on the Street Scents of Allure Homme Sport Eau Extreme....

    The guy seemed to be knowledgeable, if I'm not mistaken I can remember Al stating in a video maybe 4 videos again stating that he would be bringing that guy back to discuss essential oils.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Attars are meant to be rubbed in. Top notes and all.
    Kurt smells like Teen Spirit

  30. #30

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I was up in Guerlain earlier today, they had their traveling sales rep in who apparently is very good at matching frags to people and supposedly knowledgable about Guerlain products. So I start chattin' her up and she asks what i wear. I say "lots of stuff." She says, "well what recently?" I tell her "Ivasion Babare, Reflection, Memoir, JXXV." She's clearly getting annoyed that I haven't mentioned Guerlain. She then says, "well what do you own from Guerlain?' I tell her. She grabs a bottle of London and bombs me without three sprays and immediately starts rubbing my arm then lightly smacks it a few times. I told her "I thought we weren't supposed to rub it in." She dismissed what i was saying in way I'd only let a french broad get away. Bottom line. I didn't respect that.
    "I drank what?" -Socrates

  31. #31

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I don't think he's wrong.

    I notice a definite shorter life/projection (at least on some fragrances). It neuters the fragrance, so to speak. The top notes do get dampened in strength and it could ultimately influence someone's opinion on a scent compared to how it would have naturally presented itself.

  32. #32

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    If a fragrance is too strong, I may spray on one arm and rub on the other once in a while.

  33. #33

    Default Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    I'm a chemist. The whole "killing (or crushing) the molecules" thing is utter bullshit.

    If you rub your wrists together like you're trying to kindle a fire, the heat of friction could prematurely evaporate top notes. If you feel you have too much juice on one wrist, gently rolling your wrists together would serve nicely to redistribute the fragrance to the other wrist with no ill effects of premature evaporation. Or, perhaps one would want some extra evaporation to accentuate the top notes?
    Last edited by tensor9; 11th June 2014 at 04:15 PM.

  34. #34

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by tensor9 View Post
    The whole "killing (or crushing) the molecules" thing is utter bullshit.
    Lol, finally, thanks.
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  35. #35

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNY View Post
    Seems like everyone is in agreement that rubbing a fragrance in prompts a loss in top and/ or mid notes. Al's opinion, as he expresses in HIS videos, is simply that one should experience the entirety of a fragrance. Is this thread, which title reads that he is WRONG, really fair to him? As fragrance lovers, can we truly say he is WRONG for wanting someone to experience the entirety of a fragrance? Lay off the guy.
    .

    Relax.everyone else is entitled to their opinion also. This is a fun debate and I did not see anyone personally attacking Al who is a fun guy. It is only opinion.

  36. #36

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    He's the yo yo it's Al huh ? LOL. I hate his reviews LOL.

  37. #37

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Probably does make it less potent. Putting on a spray and just letting it set there it'll evaporate. The rubbing will obviously spread out the amount and also your skin will suck it up the more you rub. As far as "destroying the molecules", that's just his trademark thing. What's not to like about his video's? Have you seen the women he has on there lately? No reason for the hate.

  38. #38

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Al is cool. He seems like a really good guy, but I've heard him used the "crush the molecules" reasoning behind not rubbing. I cringe every time. If he's against the rubbing, that's cool, he should just use a legitimate reason for it.

  39. #39

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Wwwwwwwhat's going on everybody. Al here! Street scents!

    Is it...a tester?

  40. #40

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Lol

    Quote Originally Posted by moleo View Post
    wwwwwwwhat's going on everybody. Al here! Street scents!

  41. #41

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by mesaboogie View Post
    I respect that.
    LOL

    I thought I read somewhere the Frederic Malle says not to rub it in either, but not because you destroy the top notes. He says not to rub it in because then you spread the same scent on you in multiple places, thus preventing you from being able to sample something else later on if you want. He also says not to spray on the top of your hand, which I disagree.
    Last edited by BRM85282; 12th June 2014 at 05:42 AM.

  42. #42

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by tensor9 View Post
    I'm a chemist. The whole "killing (or crushing) the molecules" thing is utter bullshit.
    I'm sure by "killing" he means hinders the scent in how it's ought to project itself, and not the annihilation of the cellular molecules zzzz

  43. #43

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Some theorize that rubbing increases heat friction and destroys sensitive molecules. Well, we know this is true since washing hands for 15 seconds and rinsing with warm water destroys bacteria in a general sense. So, without high-tech analysis we can't be certain what it does. Enthalpy is a thermodynamic quantity equivalent to the total heat content of a system. It is equal to the internal energy of the system plus the product of pressure and volume. We certainly use pressure when rubbing and heat is created, which could drive a reaction to the right. Whatever the case, I personally feel that what ever application method makes you happy, go for it!
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  44. #44

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by SpaceAboveSky View Post
    I'm sure by "killing" he means hinders the scent in how it's ought to project itself, and not the annihilation of the cellular molecules zzzz
    killing or crushing (or whatever term you want to use) molecules can be interpreted no other way. And the molecules at hand are not cellular, they're the fragrance molecules. Cellular molecules would be the ones in your skin cells.

  45. #45

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentologist View Post
    Some theorize that rubbing increases heat friction and destroys sensitive molecules. Well, we know this is true since washing hands for 15 seconds and rinsing with warm water destroys bacteria in a general sense. So, without high-tech analysis we can't be certain what it does. Enthalpy is a thermodynamic quantity equivalent to the total heat content of a system. It is equal to the internal energy of the system plus the product of pressure and volume. We certainly use pressure when rubbing and heat is created, which could drive a reaction to the right. Whatever the case, I personally feel that what ever application method makes you happy, go for it!
    No. If the fragrance molecules decomposed at such low temperatures (the temperatures achieved by rubbing your skin together), they wouldn't last long enough to be used in a fragrance. This would mean the kinetic barrier to decomposition would be sufficiently low as to allow an unacceptable decomposition rate at room temperature. And the pressure applied is miniscule, so that would have no effect either.

    The molecules are doing nothing more than evaporating faster. That's it.

  46. #46
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by tensor9 View Post
    No. If the fragrance molecules decomposed at such low temperatures (the temperatures achieved by rubbing your skin together), they wouldn't last long enough to be used in a fragrance. This would mean the kinetic barrier to decomposition would be sufficiently low as to allow an unacceptable decomposition rate at room temperature. And the pressure applied is miniscule, so that would have no effect either.

    The molecules are doing nothing more than evaporating faster. That's it.
    What he said.

  47. #47
    Basenotes Junkie bigbloke's Avatar
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by BRM85282 View Post
    LOL

    I thought I read somewhere the Frederic Malle says not to rub it in either, but not because you destroy the top notes. He says not to rub it in because then you spread the same scent on you in multiple places, thus preventing you from being able to sample something else later on if you want. He also says not to spray on the top of your hand, which I disagree.
    I'm cautious about spraying the top of my hand now. Due to months of multiple samples a day my skin there has become sort of tired and irritated.

    I too think that it's about the top notes perhaps dissipating a little quicker rather than nuclear bombs going off.
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  48. #48

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by tensor9 View Post
    No. If the fragrance molecules decomposed at such low temperatures (the temperatures achieved by rubbing your skin together), they wouldn't last long enough to be used in a fragrance. This would mean the kinetic barrier to decomposition would be sufficiently low as to allow an unacceptable decomposition rate at room temperature. And the pressure applied is miniscule, so that would have no effect either.

    The molecules are doing nothing more than evaporating faster. That's it.
    I understand, but you're making assumptions. Some may apply more pressure than others but agree that this should have little effect. I personally don't know how sensitive natural ingredients are. I'm sure they all have varying stabilities within itself and the solution. So, I can't defer to your opinion because no one has literally measured the effect which I'm sure would be different for each perfume possibly. Highly speculative.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  49. #49

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentologist View Post
    I understand, but you're making assumptions. Some may apply more pressure than others but agree that this should have little effect. I personally don't know how sensitive natural ingredients are. I'm sure they all have varying stabilities within itself and the solution. So, I can't defer to your opinion because no one has literally measured the effect which I'm sure would be different for each perfume possibly. Highly speculative.
    The amount of pressure required to break a typical covalent bond is absurd. Not only is this pressure hopelessly unattainable by just using your wrists, the pressure would have to be incredibly directed. This is not a gas-phase equilibrium process where added pressure shifts the reaction to the left or right (depending on the number of moles of products/reactants). It's a liquid phase process. Before any chemistry has a chance to occur (at temperatures, produced by a tiny bit of friction, only very slightly above skin temperature), the most volatile notes will just have evaporated. Almost no speculation is required to come to this conclusion. If the molecules were that sensitive, they wouldn't be viable for perfumery in the first place.

  50. #50
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by tensor9 View Post
    The amount of pressure required to break a typical covalent bond is absurd. Not only is this pressure hopelessly unattainable by just using your wrists, the pressure would have to be incredibly directed. This is not a gas-phase equilibrium process where added pressure shifts the reaction to the left or right (depending on the number of moles of products/reactants). It's a liquid phase process. Before any chemistry has a chance to occur (at temperatures, produced by a tiny bit of friction, only very slightly above skin temperature), the most volatile notes will just have evaporated. Almost no speculation is required to come to this conclusion. If the molecules were that sensitive, they wouldn't be viable for perfumery in the first place.

    No kidding. If you were rubbing that hard you'd burn your skin right off.

  51. #51

  52. #52
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by remik View Post
    ... and then hair would start growing on your knuckles, from all the rubbing...

    It really does seem to be regarded as sinful by some. I like to use two sprays instead of 3. (Cheap) one on the throat, one on the wrists, rub wrists together. Guess I'll suffer for that! I also put a parfum directly against my wrist and use my wrist to smooth it around my throat and other arm. So Sue me! I've never noticed the scent going "off" because of this. This seems so wacky to me. This is just the perfumers trying to sell more juice.

  53. #53

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by tensor9 View Post
    The amount of pressure required to break a typical covalent bond is absurd. Not only is this pressure hopelessly unattainable by just using your wrists, the pressure would have to be incredibly directed. This is not a gas-phase equilibrium process where added pressure shifts the reaction to the left or right (depending on the number of moles of products/reactants). It's a liquid phase process. Before any chemistry has a chance to occur (at temperatures, produced by a tiny bit of friction, only very slightly above skin temperature), the most volatile notes will just have evaporated. Almost no speculation is required to come to this conclusion. If the molecules were that sensitive, they wouldn't be viable for perfumery in the first place.
    I'm not saying anyone is right or wrong because again you're missing other factors and I'd need some primary lit on it. I agree with you under standard laboratory conditions, but what if the person has oily skin, applied some cosmetic like lotion, etc. We know oily skin changes the scent, but to what degree, I don't know. it's hard to say what impact the mechanical action would have. In case you haven't noticed, my position is neutral. So before you push me into the camp that says it destroy fragrance, reread my posts. I'm merely hypothesizing what may, or may not happen while stating what others have thought and clearly don't care either way enough to pursue such a study. LET ME SAY THIS LOUD AND REPEAT MYSELF, apply fragrance how ever you want to!! It makes no difference to me and shouldn't have an effect on the experience.
    Last edited by Scentologist; 13th June 2014 at 08:05 PM.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  54. #54

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by remik View Post
    ... and then hair would start growing on your knuckles, from all the rubbing...

    ��
    Or a UTI would develop indirectly
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  55. #55

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Ok, here is an article that says rubbing wrists bypasses the top notes and goes straight the heart nots. Does it? IDK, but according to this expert it does.....

    "But according to Mr. Frémont, there is a good reason to stop that wrist-rub habit: it changes the way the scent performs on your skin.
    Typically, complex scents are a combination of top notes, middle or heart notes and base notes. Top notes are more delicate, lighter, and dissipate most quickly; base notes are heavier molecules, longer lasting. And if you rub your wrists together right after putting on your favourite fragrance, you really do spoil those light-molecule top notes. The friction between the perfume and your skin’s natural oils “rushes the fragrance,” says Frémont. In effect, he says, you’re fast-forwarding your scent experience, bypassing the opening and going straight to the heart notes. Catastrophic? No. But when you spend what you spend on fragrance, and the top notes are what attracted you to the perfume in the first place (you have to love the top notes even to consider sampling the juice, right?), why would you skip the first-date stage of your day?

    UPDATE: Harry Frémont is the master perfumer behind the new Estée Lauder Modern Muse fragrance"
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  56. #56

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Another article that states the molecules aren't broken, but evaporate away when heat is generated since perfume works through evaporation. The article suggest to rub your wrist slowly if you must do it.

    "Perfumes work through evaporation. When you spray a fragrance onto your skin, your body temperature causes the fragrance molecules to start evaporating. As they evaporate they fly away from the body and give off their scent. The warmer your body is, the faster these scents evaporate.

    What you’re doing when you rub your wrists together is generating heat. Heat increases the rate of evaporation and some notes are more susceptible to heat than others. Due to the different rate of evaporation, the perfume may end up smelling different than it should.

    This does not mean that wrist rubbing should be banned and you’re a terrible person if you rub your wrists together to distribute the fragrance. Nah. If you want to rub or you’re just used to it, then do it slowly. You’re not in the wrist rubbing competition here and you’re probably not trying to start a fire using your wrists either. Though that would probably make you very popular among smokers and campers."
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  57. #57
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Quote Originally Posted by kumquat View Post
    It really does seem to be regarded as sinful by some. I like to use two sprays instead of 3. (Cheap) one on the throat, one on the wrists, rub wrists together. Guess I'll suffer for that! I also put a parfum directly against my wrist and use my wrist to smooth it around my throat and other arm. So Sue me! I've never noticed the scent going "off" because of this. This seems so wacky to me. This is just the perfumers trying to sell more juice.
    LOL, Paula, I guess the big smiley didn't come through... I posted my comment via Tapatalk form my iPhone, I see it stripped the emoticon. That was just a joke, I have nothing against rubbing fragrance the way you described.


    Quote Originally Posted by Scentologist View Post
    Ok, here is an article that says rubbing wrists bypasses the top notes and goes straight the heart nots. Does it?
    Good point, but this may not necessarily be a bad thing. If you think about it, the top notes never last very long anyway, and if you are shopping for new fragrance, perhaps this method can allow you to get to the heart of the fragrance faster than sitting there and waiting in the store for half an hour for the fragrance to reach the point that you'll be normally "stuck with" for several hours. There are perfumes (I'm looking at you, Creed!) that are very top-loaded and the initial impression is what sells them, only to fizz out and mellow out to "blah" levels - I think using the rubbing method you can quickly see how the fragrance develops and what you will really be smelling after the wonderful top notes are gone.

    I'm not taking sides, pro or against rubbing fragrances in, I think there are reasons to justify both options, and explanations that you can use to support (or not) this method. Whatever works for you. There are fragrances I'd like to fast forward the opening, personally, so this may be a viable way to achieve that. And there are fragrances I love the opening of, in which case I'd try not to rub anything and enjoy the top notes as much as I can. Whatever works, right?

  58. #58
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Seems like only a theory to me. Impossible to prove and strictly a matter of opinion. Rather than missing out on top notes, I'd say what you get is COVERAGE. You get the full effect of the fragrance more quickly. What's wrong with that?

    Remik, I got your smiley! Thanks!

  59. #59

    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    Agree Remik, whatever works for you do it. I don't rub simply because I don't spray on my wrists. The few times I have, I recall rubbing on occasion.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  60. #60
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    Default Re: Al from Street Scents is wrong about rubbing it in

    PS, I'm certainly not taking this very seriously. It strikes me funny, that's all.

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