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  1. #31
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    To the people who quoted my post, my remarks were based on my experience in the U.S., though it may be different in other developed countries.

    And yes, I would agree that it's more common for a woman to wear perfume, as beauty products are seen as more feminine, and there is a stigma that men who take too much care of their appearance are gay or metro.

  2. #32

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Rüssel View Post
    I smell fragrances on men and women every day. Not rare here.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Surprised. Where are you based, if you don't mind me asking?

    Or maybe its just that I'm invading people's personal space more? :-p
    central london, mayfair! but then again, i don't go around sniffing people on the street, don't use public transport (i cycle), don't go to clubs and/or night bars (or any bars, married with 1 small child and another on the way) and usually dismiss what i smell in dept stores as their whole space smells like perfume. i think my observations are based more on the work enviroment and people i work with/for. also, maybe i've become completely anosmic to smells and do not smell anything else but myself. i've had a friend recently visiting from eastern europe and she mentioned that everyone in london smells really nice, wherever you go, being tube, buses or just walking down the street. my reaction to her was: "really???". also, i might be a bit biased as i when i've answered to the question i thought more of men and their daily use of fragrance, rather then women which i've thought as 'normal' to use perfume on a daily basis. hmmmmm... am i contradicting myself??.. alfarom's comment is even more surprising than mine, he lives in italy, i'd have thought everybody uses fragrance as part of their daily beauty routine over there!

  3. #33

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by danny1967 View Post
    central london, mayfair! but then again, i don't go around sniffing people on the street, don't use public transport (i cycle), don't go to clubs and/or night bars (or any bars, married with 1 small child and another on the way) and usually dismiss what i smell in dept stores as their whole space smells like perfume. i think my observations are based more on the work enviroment and people i work with/for. also, maybe i've become completely anosmic to smells and do not smell anything else but myself. i've had a friend recently visiting from eastern europe and she mentioned that everyone in london smells really nice, wherever you go, being tube, buses or just walking down the street. my reaction to her was: "really???". also, i might be a bit biased as i when i've answered to the question i thought more of men and their daily use of fragrance, rather then women which i've thought as 'normal' to use perfume on a daily basis. hmmmmm... am i contradicting myself??.. alfarom's comment is even more surprising than mine, he lives in italy, i'd have thought everybody uses fragrance as part of their daily beauty routine over there!
    Not using public transport probably helps lol. I'd say around here (London Bridge, Clapham, etc) quite a few of the well dressed men also wear fragrance, sometimes quite loudly so. I do notice it much more since taking interest in perfume though, trying to sniff out what they're wearing, so I'm probably looking for it more.
    My girlfriend is Eastern European, not sure if she's typical, but she certainly does apply her scents quite lightly. Maybe they don't spray so much over there.

  4. #34

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by alfarom View Post
    Same here...

    I'm really surprised by this, whenever I visit Italy I find more people seem to wear fragrances than they do back home. But I suppose it could be because I'm visiting holiday destinations and the big cities, Rome, Turin, Naples and Milan most often (with detours to smaller cities like Parma, Modena and Bologna sometimes), and maybe people are more likely to wear fragrance in those parts of Italy... I dunno :P
    Last edited by Hilaire; 6th July 2012 at 12:07 PM.

  5. #35

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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by andylama View Post
    What drives me crazy: I'll be in public and come across some random guy (usually a guy) who's wearing something that catches my nose instantly because it smells absolutely fantastic, and I have no idea what it is...and I'm not about to ask. So I go through the rest of my day wishing I knew what the hell it was...but I will never know. Alas!
    That's terrible! What will happen if you ask the guy?

    Maybe you need to have a female friend with you at all times to help in these situations.

  6. #36

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    I rarely smell fragrance on anyone except the occasional old lady or party-goer. Having consistently no smell at all is an achievement of the late 20th century that seems by far the most popular expression of modern grooming.
    Last edited by frug; 6th July 2012 at 02:03 PM.

  7. #37

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Where I work exactly 50% of the males wear fragrance every day and 100% of the women. Confirmed and rock solid information from the CEO of the company.

    And I come across some great wafts of sillage around Central at lunchtime - caught some Vanille Galante strolling by one day, Oriental Brulant another.

  8. #38

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    In the UK - I only occasionally ' smell fragrance on anybody during the day, but come nighttime, especially weekends - Everybody seems to be wearing it - men and women.

  9. #39
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    (sigh) Rarely, too rarely. I attended a 4th of July street fair Wed and smelled NOTHING except kettle corn during the whole time there with hundreds, if not thousands, in attendance.
    There is one young man at work who tastefully wears scent and I encourage him by passing on samples.
    Even clients who used to routinely douse themselves in fruity floral body sprays seem to have ended that phase of their lives.

    How I long to say the magic words "You smell good- what are you wearing" to someone.
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  10. #40

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quite often! Around 1 in 3 people I meet are wearing a perfume.

  11. #41

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    In France, body odor IS a frag for some guys.
    Sorry, just kidding.

  12. #42

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    I'm a high school teacher (in the US) and a very high percentage of students, both males and females, wear fragrance. For the males, most of the time it's some nasty smelling AXE, or something popular and recognizable like AdG or Chrome, and occasionally something that actually smells good (sorry AdG and Chrome fans).

    But just because you don't notice it, doesn't mean people aren't using it. I tend to be pretty trigger happy with my fragrances, but when I recently mentioned to my father that I was selling off some of my collection, he commented, "You wear cologne?"
    Just because it happened to you doesn't make it interesting.

    In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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  13. #43
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    I never do, unfortunately. But when I do, despite my personal snobbishness, I think it is great ! It is usually Cool Water or Armani Code. Hey, at least the guy is trying! One that I do not like smelling is Acqua di Gio pour Homme. Blech ! And that is just my reaction to the guys who wear them ( tight Ed Hardy and Tap Out shirts ...etc). I also don't care for the fragrance in its melon disaster self.

    Women moreso have a smell to them. It is usually a body spray or hair product. Fragrance being worn is rare as well, like men. Once in a blue moon I get a drive-by assault of Angel. That is usually followed by me making a trip to the store for some candy and chocolate.

    I should add that I don't really go out to "da club" or bars or just out in general too much. I have a feeling that people, where I live, think fragrances are for a special occasion only or "going out".
    Seeking: Bottles/decants : of Aramis New West, Alain Delon Iquitos, Feeling Man, Gucci pour Homme, Essence of John Galliano, Oxford & Cambridge, Azzaro pour Homme (vintage),...etc.

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  14. #44
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Kagey View Post
    Of course, there are always people who wear so little that you can't smell them in passing. I'm told I'm one of those people. Even if I apply what I think is a lot, people say they can't smell me.
    I think this applies... especially when the wearer is wearing primarily for their own enjoyment, is concientious of how they are perceived, and is considerate to others.
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  15. #45
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Kagey View Post
    That's terrible! What will happen if you ask the guy?

    Maybe you need to have a female friend with you at all times to help in these situations.
    Yes Kagey! I'd ask. I have and I would again, in a second.

    Quote Originally Posted by knit at nite View Post
    (sigh) Rarely, too rarely. I attended a 4th of July street fair Wed and smelled NOTHING except kettle corn during the whole time there with hundreds, if not thousands, in attendance.
    There is one young man at work who tastefully wears scent and I encourage him by passing on samples.
    Even clients who used to routinely douse themselves in fruity floral body sprays seem to have ended that phase of their lives.

    How I long to say the magic words "You smell good- what are you wearing" to someone.
    Kettle corn - gives me a giggle. But, it's true, isn't it? Not nearly enough people wearing perfume!

  16. #46
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    I work in healthcare, so I don't come across people wearing perfume often. If they are, it is a visitor or a nurse may wear it occasionally (usually one of the CLEAN line). I used to come across perfume more often when I worked in retail.

    edit: I forgot to mention that I notice fragrance on men a lot more than women. Fragrance seems to project more or men may apply more of it than women do.
    Last edited by Hayven; 9th July 2012 at 10:33 AM.

  17. #47
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by SmellsLike View Post
    I'm a high school teacher (in the US) and a very high percentage of students, both males and females, wear fragrance.
    I was about to say that I think it's more popular among the "younger" demographic (under 25, high school and college).....for a few obvious reasons: 1) they're very much into themselves (sorry, young people...it's true), and 2) they use it as a conversation piece and ice breaker as much as to actually "smell good". Kind of a "Hey, what are you wearing?" sort of thing. Actually, I don't think that the scent attracts a girl to a particular guy or "draws her in", so to speak, as much as it provides her with a build-in ice-breaker/ conversation starter with a guy that she finds "hot" or attractive. Young girls aren't shy about approaching guys they may be interested in, and commenting on his cologne/fragrance is just a natural conversation starter.

    That said....I do think that wearing fragrances probably reached it's peak in popularity in the U.S. in the 80's/early to mid 90's. At least, it doesn't seem quite as mainstream for men to wear fragrances in the U.S. these days as much as it was during that time period. And I'm not sure exactly what may have changed that....but I can't help but wonder if Calvin Klein coming out with CK1 had anything to do with the decline in interest (mid 90's, around the time period I think interest seemed to start to wane a bit). I mean, once companies started marketing to men and women as if they are the same and there is no difference...I wonder if a lot of men were turned off by the idea of wearing a fragrance? (sorry, ladies...we may love ya....but most men still want to smell different than you / i.e. - "more like men") I also think that having so many companies coming out with so many different fragrances....many of which are literally here today and gone later today.....along with the "weaker projection and poor longevity" from many of today's fragrances (as not to "offend" anyone) might have a lot of adults these days saying "why bother?" Oh well, food for thought.....

  18. #48
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    I was about to say that I think it's more popular among the "younger" demographic (under 25, high school and college).....for a few obvious reasons: 1) they're very much into themselves (sorry, young people...it's true)....
    No, it is not true. Just your opinion. Sure, younger demographic may be more "into" their looks/fashion...etc. But that is because of experience. Once you are older and more experienced ( I suppose, for lack of better word), you may not care as much or just get tired and move on......or more likely just still care as much about your looks/fashion, but not be as vocal about it.
    I could go on and on.....really.

    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    ... 2) they use it as a conversation piece and ice breaker as much as to actually "smell good". Kind of a "Hey, what are you wearing?" sort of thing. Actually, I don't think that the scent attracts a girl to a particular guy or "draws her in", so to speak, as much as it provides her with a build-in ice-breaker/ conversation starter with a guy that she finds "hot" or attractive. Young girls aren't shy about approaching guys they may be interested in, and commenting on his cologne/fragrance is just a natural conversation starter....
    Maybe....

    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    ....I do think that wearing fragrances probably reached it's peak in popularity in the U.S. in the 80's/early to mid 90's. At least, it doesn't seem quite as mainstream for men to wear fragrances in the U.S. these days as much as it was during that time period. And I'm not sure exactly what may have changed that....
    I think you could be correct with your first line. As far as what changed that, there is no one particular reasons. It can be many. But the fact is, this happened on the watch of the demographic that is older than 25 years old right now ( Gen X and Baby Boomers).

    Also, for a good reading on why fragrances changed and transitioned from the 1980s, the book Perfume: The Art and Science of Scent by Cathy Newman gives some pretty good insight ( Aids/ Notion of what smells attractive/changing aromachemicals/smelling clean Vs. erotic....etc). Since the book is by National Geographic, it comes with nice pictures ( unlike many books on Perfume).

    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    ....but I can't help but wonder if Calvin Klein coming out with CK1 had anything to do with the decline in interest (mid 90's, around the time period I think interest seemed to start to wane a bit).....
    No, I would totally disagree. If anything, early 1990s Calvin Klein fragrances help the fragrance industry and popularity. Yeah, I don't like the fragrances. And yes, they were very different than what was around 5 years earlier. But they ( CK One, Escape, Eternity ) were smash success's and schools were reeking of them. CK One was massive in popularity.

    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    ...I mean, once companies started marketing to men and women as if they are the same and there is no difference...I wonder if a lot of men were turned off by the idea of wearing a fragrance? (sorry, ladies...we may love ya....but most men still want to smell different than you / i.e. - "more like men").....
    Again, strongly disagree. There is an abundance of "manly man" fragrances out there. Most don't sell as good as the cleaner or sweeter fragrances.

    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    ... I also think that having so many companies coming out with so many different fragrances....many of which are literally here today and gone later today.....along with the "weaker projection and poor longevity" from many of today's fragrances (as not to "offend" anyone) might have a lot of adults these days saying "why bother?" Oh well, food for thought.....
    There are alot of releases, agreed. It is overwhelming.
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  19. #49
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Surfacing View Post
    No, it is not true. Just your opinion.
    Yes, you are correct....that is my opinion.

    You do bring up a good point, though, that people may not be as "vocal" about it as they get older, and that they still care.....I will agree with you about that. But I stand by my comment that younger people are very much into themselves (and that's not being critical, it simply is what it is)....because while it's my opinion, it's also based on life experiences. I was once "under the age of 25" (I'm now 20 years past that), so I have life experiences from my personal life, my generational peer group, the current generation (and I do interact with many of them), etc. to base that on. And to be honest, I'd be willing to bet that nearly any poll taken would reflect that there are an awful lot of people who think and feel as I do about that, if they are honest about it.

    That said.....

    Quote Originally Posted by Surfacing View Post
    Sure, younger demographic may be more "into" their looks/fashion...etc.

    early 1990s Calvin Klein fragrances help the fragrance industry and popularity. Yeah, I don't like the fragrances. And yes, they were very different than what was around 5 years earlier. But they ( CK One, Escape, Eternity ) were smash success's and schools were reeking of them. CK One was massive in popularity.

    There is an abundance of "manly man" fragrances out there. Most don't sell as good as the cleaner or sweeter fragrances.
    If you follow your comments above that I have quoted out to their logical conclusion, if you really think about it....you are basically reaffirming what I said previously that may be the case (younger people, schools, sweeter *i.e. - more 'unisex' type* fragrances selling better than the more "manly" scents, etc.) Because I was basically talking about how the older demographic doesn't care as much about fragrances as the under 25 age group, and therefore was asking the question/making the comment that perhaps it may have been the "unisex" explosion in the fragrance industry that could have been a turnoff to older adults (and I was just past the age of 25 when CK One came out)....because in the 80's/early 90's, it wasn't unusual to smell a man in his 50's or 60's wearing what most would consider, a "manly" cologne. Now, though, you simply don't see as many "older" adults even wearing fragrance as much as you USED to (at least, not in many parts of the United States). And I believe that's why the OP started this thread and asked this very question regarding popularity in the first place. I was simply coming at it from an "over 25" angle, since most people under 25 still use fragrances and that likely isn't going to change, for the reasons that I mentioned (more into themselves, and as a conversation piece and ice breaker, etc.).
    Last edited by SportsFan; 8th July 2012 at 01:16 AM.

  20. #50
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by SportsFan View Post
    ....If you follow your comments above that I have quoted out to their logical conclusion, if you really think about it....you are basically reaffirming what I said previously that may be the case (younger people, schools, sweeter *i.e. - more 'unisex' type* fragrances selling better than the more "manly" scents, etc.) Because I was basically talking about how the older demographic doesn't care as much about fragrances as the under 25 age group, and therefore was asking the question/making the comment that perhaps it may have been the "unisex" explosion in the fragrance industry that could have been a turnoff to older adults (and I was just past the age of 25 when CK One came out)....because in the 80's/early 90's, it wasn't unusual to smell a man in his 50's or 60's wearing what most would consider, a "manly" cologne. Now, though, you simply don't see as many "older" adults even wearing fragrance as much as you USED to (at least, not in many parts of the United States). And I believe that's why the OP started this thread and asked this very question regarding popularity in the first place. I was simply coming at it from an "over 25" angle, since most people under 25 still use fragrances and that likely isn't going to change, for the reasons that I mentioned (more into themselves, and as a conversation piece and ice breaker, etc.).
    Without getting too much off topic, I believe people can be "too into themselves" in different ways. I think the older demographics are quite guilty of this.

    Anways, with regards to your last paragraph and the topic of older men wearing fragrances : It is really unfortunate that there is this stigma to this supposed "old man cologne". But I suppose it is the same thing as my own personal bias against "d-bag cologne" ( The 1 Millions, Acqua di Gio pour Homme, Fierce....etc). When I went to a store to try out fragrances and mentioned I enjoy far more mature and dated fragrances, I was pointed toward Chanel Bleu .

    I think that stigma to old man cologne has really lessened the popularity of the older fragrances ( but I don't know that to be a fact, just opinion).

    In any event, I really hope there will be a more acceptance of fragrance wearing on a casual basis in the future ( as in, wearing it everyday just because ). I am not sure what would have to happen to create that. It seems alot of people really dislike fragrances, although they don't consider things and choices that they make to disrupt and annoy other people.
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  21. #51
    Basenotes Junkie Indaco's Avatar
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    There's one guy with an office down the hall from mine who wears some aquatic. I'm not sure who it is, but you can always tell when he's around because the hall smells very aquatic (rather than slightly musty). Whenever I notice scents on women, they usually seem to be cheap boring body-spray sorts. Every now and again I'll come across someone wearing an actual fragrance, and the rarity makes it all the more memorable.

    At night, I notice guys wearing things like Le Male, usually over-sprayed to the point of drowning out everything else.

  22. #52
    Basenotes Junkie anomie et ivoire's Avatar
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    But the fact is, this happened on the watch of the demographic that is older than 25 years old right now ( Gen X and Baby Boomers).
    This is a bugaboo, and not directed at anyone here, but I'm 26, born in 1986, and slightly younger people, ages 20-23, will often accuse me of being Gen X.

    That's absurd. Gen X ended in the late 70s--1980 at the very latest.

    Yes, "young people" frequently think anyone even minorly older is old: that narcissism of small differences.

    I mean, we all know that generational cutoffs are pretty arbitrary/liminal and that generations are a slightly larger narcissistic difference in their own right, but grouping anyone who isn't a current college student in with the very distinctive Gen X (and I'd say, I'd much rather be part of their generation but am sadly stuck being one of these internet and video game-raised people) is downright lazy failure to use Wikipedia. And that's *our* generation's one coup!

    I too, and plenty of over 25s, grew up with precious little more than bodyspray as popular scent. At least the Gen X kids had earlier CK and 80s powerhouse stragglers. The scents marketed to young people now are mostly about being clean, banally attractive, that sort of gym mentality that would make all the good baby boomers and gen Xers puke back in their day (sure, now they've mostly settled into hyper-sanitary casual, at least in the USA, too).

    Sidenote: getting into fragrance has been a great way of transcending generational limitations while being able to access sensory artifacts of other times. We can all be 1950s bombshells, 1960s mod chic, 1970s naturals, 80s egomaniac creeps, 90s nihilists, and whatever-the-feck 2000s with the "dzing!" of a sprayer.
    Last edited by anomie et ivoire; 10th July 2012 at 05:52 AM.

  23. #53
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    Thumbs down Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by anomie et ivoire View Post
    This is a bugaboo, and not directed at anyone here, but I'm 26, born in 1986, and slightly younger people, ages 20-23, will often accuse me of being Gen X.

    That's absurd. Gen X ended in the late 70s--1980 at the very latest. ...
    I didn't write that people who are older than 25 right now are all Gen X. I wrote that the fragrance tastes/types changed under the watch of people who are older than 25 right now. I thought we were using the age of 25 to determine who is a naive self entitled lazy child vs. who is a wise and educated person who never makes generalizations about others. .

    I know when Gen X ended.

    When you write :

    The scents marketed to young people now are mostly about being clean, banally attractive, that sort of gym mentality that would make all the good baby boomers and gen Xers puke back in their day
    ^ These are fragrances which Gen Xers and Baby Boomers buy consistently. Gen Xers are just as much afraid of "old man cologne" as Gen Y's. Fragrances are not just marketed towards young people. I see fragrance ads in all kinds of magazines for all kinds of age ranges.
    Seeking: Bottles/decants : of Aramis New West, Alain Delon Iquitos, Feeling Man, Gucci pour Homme, Essence of John Galliano, Oxford & Cambridge, Azzaro pour Homme (vintage),...etc.

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  24. #54
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Still, most fragrance marketing is a hypersexual take on the teen to twenty-fiver demographic, silverfox gentleman stuff, or graceful lady standbys as fronted by very youthful looking grown women like Gwyneth Paltrow and Julianne Moore. There is so much more out there to be exploited and played with, and yes, ads should be irrelevant and are mostly annoying--but they get the word out at least... old ads can be an absolute delight in comparison for their striking variety... http://www.vintageadbrowser.com/perfume-ads-1960s

    Surfacing sorry for the silly mini-rant. I thought your insights were fascinating and great and agree, but it can be really strange how younger generations have not only no regard for history but an active suspiscion of anything or anyone with history. Wow... now I really do sound like an old lady...must be all the old lady 'fumes. Going to read Perfume: The Art and Science of Scent as per your mention.

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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by anomie et ivoire View Post
    ....Surfacing sorry for the silly mini-rant. I thought your insights were fascinating and great and agree, but it can be really strange how younger generations have not only no regard for history but an active suspiscion of anything or anyone with history. Wow... now I really do sound like an old lady...must be all the old lady 'fumes. Going to read Perfume: The Art and Science of Scent as per your mention.
    No worries, but I strongly feel it is older generations that dicate the younger generations behavior. Now, more than ever. Exploit.....exploit......exploit. My favorite is how older generations label the youth as "self entitled". This seems to be very trendy nowadays. You have to provide good schools and social well-being to have good youth ( and much more). And not just YOUR kids ( I am not picking you per-se). Everyones. Older generations are not as interested in history as they make it out to be anyways. Seems like alot of them are just interested in propaganda, cultural necrophilia and just re-asserting dominance.

    And to be fair, I do get that there is a problem with youth having little interest in history, being ageist ( or considering anyone above a certain age to be ancient...etc), disrespect.....etc. But I get why many are that way as well. It still is something that bothers me as well.


    By the way, thanks for providing that link to the Perfume Ads. I do agree, older ads are great. It is interesting because much is made of those CK ads being edgy and cool from the 1990s.......I find those ads to be lame and boring. I love older ads. But even some new and recent ads are quite great. I love Kenzo fragrance ads ! Also, YSL ads for Rive Gauche pour Homme are great. So much more....

    I have seen a different Lauder for Men ad ( 1980s) a while back on the net and thought it was remarkable on how different it was compared to ads of today ( this one is like that as well : http://www.vintageadbrowser.com/perfume-ads-1980s ). You rarely see such a conservatively dressed man in a fragrance ad these days. The ads of today make the man seem like he is either on the prowl or asserting dominace ( could be in a stance position).
    Seeking: Bottles/decants : of Aramis New West, Alain Delon Iquitos, Feeling Man, Gucci pour Homme, Essence of John Galliano, Oxford & Cambridge, Azzaro pour Homme (vintage),...etc.

    Seeking decant/sample of PdE Ambre Russe, Jil Sander Feeling Man, Comme des Garcons 2 Man, Giorgio VIP, ....etc. I have samples to swap.

    More HERE
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  26. #56
    Basenotes Junkie anomie et ivoire's Avatar
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    I think the 1950s construct of the teenager and its mass, unending fetishization has done a major number on the west, cementing hellish narcissism in us all. Once being wise and experienced rather than brash and careless becomes cool, maybe we'll stop f'ing things up for future generations.

    While I hear you Surfacing, this problem of generational blame has been cycling forever and is unlikely to stop. There will soon be kids blaming us, too. Sure, there hasn't been a more financially and socially irresponsible lot as the yuppies spawned of former trend-counterculture folks in some time, but when we all see how knowing history is just as important as being able to forget it at the right times, maybe the cycle will be less intense. Increased availability of self-education sources could be an answer.

  27. #57
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by anomie et ivoire View Post
    I think the 1950s construct of the teenager and its mass, unending fetishization has done a major number on the west, cementing hellish narcissism in us all. Once being wise and experienced rather than brash and careless becomes cool, maybe we'll stop f'ing things up for future generations.

    While I hear you Surfacing, this problem of generational blame has been cycling forever and is unlikely to stop. There will soon be kids blaming us, too. Sure, there hasn't been a more financially and socially irresponsible lot as the yuppies spawned of former trend-counterculture folks in some time, but when we all see how knowing history is just as important as being able to forget it at the right times, maybe the cycle will be less intense. Increased availability of self-education sources could be an answer.
    I tend to agree, and disagree with what you just said.

    You're blaming the right, and I blame the left. You blame the 50's, I blame the 60's. You blame the yuppies, I blame the hippies.

    Other than that, we're kind of singing the same sort of tune.....

  28. #58
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by anomie et ivoire View Post
    I think the 1950s construct of the teenager and its mass, unending fetishization has done a major number on the west, cementing hellish narcissism in us all. Once being wise and experienced rather than brash and careless becomes cool, maybe we'll stop f'ing things up for future generations.

    While I hear you Surfacing, this problem of generational blame has been cycling forever and is unlikely to stop. There will soon be kids blaming us, too. Sure, there hasn't been a more financially and socially irresponsible lot as the yuppies spawned of former trend-counterculture folks in some time, but when we all see how knowing history is just as important as being able to forget it at the right times, maybe the cycle will be less intense. Increased availability of self-education sources could be an answer.
    Very well said and I do agree.
    Seeking: Bottles/decants : of Aramis New West, Alain Delon Iquitos, Feeling Man, Gucci pour Homme, Essence of John Galliano, Oxford & Cambridge, Azzaro pour Homme (vintage),...etc.

    Seeking decant/sample of PdE Ambre Russe, Jil Sander Feeling Man, Comme des Garcons 2 Man, Giorgio VIP, ....etc. I have samples to swap.

    More HERE
    Please PM me !

  29. #59
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    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Sportsfan, really the yuppies are the former hippies anyway. Hmm, I need to get with the current times though, I say blame... the perfume makers--those allergen-pushing decadent devils!

    And Surfacing, as per ads: as a small child I used to idolize and imitate the Kate Moss Obsession commercial, down to memorizing the script. WTF? Scary! Children really are both more mature and more impressionable than they're given credit for... those 80s ads with their extreme dapperness are rather nice. Put a man in a suit in an advertisement now and he'll probably be some actor looking a bit unnatural and stiff.

  30. #60

    Default Re: The actual popularity of fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Astrud View Post
    In France, body odor IS a frag for some guys.
    Sorry, just kidding.
    I Love this. Serieusement, J'adore. Bravo. I have lived outside of France "in the Provinces" (For Parisians = Anywhere that's not Paris) for fifteen years now. When I go back to Paris, I hate everything: It looks like Disneyland now. All that gold leaf! Everything so clean! Everybody complaining! Really the only thing I miss about France is being able to: 1. Embrace my own body scent if I feel like it, and 2. Feeling free to wear nuclear strength scents and not feel out of place. When I go back to Paris, I enjoy mostly: the smells. I love the smell of cheese. I love the smell of ladies on Avenue Montaigne. I love the smell of the women in the TATI at Barbes. I love the smell of dapper men walking down rue de Rivoli. France is a paradise of smells: Even the really appalling ones are fascinating to me, like the "Gauloise Chain Smoking Old Yellow Man on The Metro" one. It seems to me, walking around "In the Provinces," all you smell is: Cigarette smoke, urine, that "beer + B.O. + misery" accord: The only time you get to smell something lovely is when the flowers are in bloom and you walk through them. Otherwise, unless you happen to be at Barney's, nobody smells like anything, and when they do, it's misery. SO: That is why I will walk out of my house with up to 10 sprays of EdT under my clothes, and at least 4 sprays or dabs (depending on the comp) of Parfum, because I do live in a major cosmopolitan city, and often times I feel it is my sole responsibility to perfume it in its entirety......
    "...a Chacun son Mauvais Gout."

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