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  1. #1

    Default Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    Though I didn't realize it, I acquired a bottle of the new Acteur in a swap recently (I thought it was vintage but that's another story and I still would have done the swap). Unlike most other such reformulations, the base of the new Acteur seems reasonably good and faithful to the original. The opening, however, is different. In the vintage version there is a boozy, rosy quality that is strong and rich. In the new one, there is more of a weird fruity quality that has a "blob"-like aspect to it. I think there is some lemon in there but otherwise it has a bit of that candle wax/fruit accord I've come across before (such as in Rochas Moustache concentrated version). I don't like it. However, while I don't think it smells particularly good, it is easier to wear than the original, which is really strong (and many will think too "feminine," I'd guess). After perhaps an hour or two they are much more similar than at first. I'll have to do more testing but this is my initial impression. Anyone else have experience with both versions?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    I've never smelled the current version, but i think vintage is exactly how you describe it. Boozy and Rosy! Nice Stuff.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    I don't know which version I have but it is nasty stuff!!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    I think if it says 90% on the front of the bottle it is the original, and I'd guess splash bottles are original.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    O/T: The perfumer for Acteur is Maurice Maurin. What an intriguing chap! I saw him recently in 'The Cave of Forgotten Dreams' by Werner Herzog; he was sniffing gaps between rocks in the Chauvet area of Southern France, in order to try and detect smells of ancient inhabited caves:


  6. #6
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    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    Bigsly, that was interesting to read. "Blob"! If the drydown comes anything close to the original then it's always good news.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    My guess is that they tried to recreate the drydown with considerably cheaper ingredients. If you don't smell it up close it's a fairly good recreation, but the top notes are not pleasant to me in this new one.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    I agree too Bigsly. I have a 100ml bottle of 'new' acteur and a small sample bottle of the 'old' version and your description for me nails it. The boozy, heady fruit smell is missing at the start replaced by a toned down, less intense version of it. The drydowns are, for me, virtually identical but the fragrance as a whole seems much more one-dimensional than the older formulation. I still like it as a fragrance though and wear it quite often. It lasts amazingly well and is still, for me, a well put together masculine rose fragrance.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    I just got a bottle of this on Tuesday and am impressed. I am not sure if it is the new or old formulation, but it is definitely boozy to start off with. It kind of reminds me of rose scented Turkish delight mixed with an aromatic fougere.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    Quote Originally Posted by EarNoseThroat View Post
    I've never smelled the current version, but i think vintage is exactly how you describe it. Boozy and Rosy! Nice Stuff.
    Agree.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    Quote Originally Posted by Derbyman View Post
    I have a 100ml bottle of 'new' acteur and a small sample bottle of the 'old' version
    Same here. I also mistook new for vintage (no regrets though).
    After the surprise of having both new and vintage, I did hand2hand and felt the new is a watered down vintage.
    They're so similar that I'm stuck between saying f*** and thanks to whomever is now in charge for scents at Azzaro.

    Regards, Odor.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    I'm quite interested to try this as I work in Theatre. I imagine it smelling like a more classic, synthetic version of Lyric Man.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    I have the new formulation and i quite like it. It lasts a long time but dont have much projection, even with a heavy application.

    For me this version is very green (the entire rose, with petals, leafs and stem)

  14. #14

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    The opening of the vintage is too strong and simple for me, which is similar to what I've encountered with a lot of niche frags. The opening of the new one is just nasty to me. However, after the openings subside I was surprised at how similar they were. Since I am mostly interested in the drydowns of frags, it should be okay, though I wonder if they could have spent a little bit more to create a better opening, even if it wasn't that similar to the original. I think the new one might have a simpler drydown but that you really notice that only if you smell where you sprayed, not if you allow it to waft up a foot or more to your nose. I was surprised to learn that this one was reformulated at all, since it seems like if it was popular, that was long ago.
    Last edited by Bigsly; 21st July 2012 at 02:25 AM.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    Hi Bigsly & fellow Basenoters -

    Vintage is, to me, both superior in ingredients and much more well-constructed. I find the soliflore of a wilting rose (not fresh) with a bowl of fruit beneath it catching the petals. There is definitely a boozy warmth. The depth of the composition in Vintage is remarkable - with true oakmoss in the base! It wears incredible smooth, masculine and has a radiant, "aura-scent" vibe that is Azzaro's trademark. The new formulation has a "fizzy" rose note on top, less structure in the heart (key ingredients that make this outstanding are the off-setting, sharp carnation that livens up the middle and the deep, earthy patchouli that also adds a lot to the fragrance) and a weaker base. Both have leather, but it is superior in Vintage - along with the key "warming" notes of amber and the nice musk. I find more vetiver in Vintage as well. I bought a bottle of current formulation and it is put away after a few test wearings. I have multiple bottles of Vintage, including Splash bottles that I decant as well as sprays. I have multiple sources for Vintage at a very fair price.

    I find that you need to apply this from a bit of distance from an atomizer, as it is very brooding if applied directly from a splash and you don't get the note separation. However, the key to this scent for me is to apply it rather liberally to my chest, neck and wrists and let it breathe (similar to how I wear Azzaro Pour Homme). I always like to put this one on the backs of my hands as well - as it really projects (same with APH).

    My wife adores it and believes the rose note (alone) could be for a woman's fragrance, but the supporting notes make this clearly masculine. It is one of the absolutely most incredible masculine rose scents ever created (in Vintage formulation). I like it as much (if not more) than Vintage Azzaro Pour Homme - the flagship Aromatic Fougere that made Loris Azzaro's house what it is today. Similar to the reformulation of Azzaro Pour Homme - sharper top notes in the current formulation, a more hollow heart/middle and less depth on the base (with NO or very little Oakmoss due to IFRA regulation). Both scents are shadows of their former selves...but still wearable.

    Cheers.
    Last edited by ericrico; 21st July 2012 at 05:11 AM.
    “Some perfumes are as fragrant as an infant’s flesh, sweet as an oboe’s cry, and greener than the spring; While others are triumphant, decadent or rich; Having the expansion of infinite things, like ambergris and musk, benzoin and frankincense, which sing the transports of the mind and every sense.”

    ― Charles Baudelaire, The Flowers of Evil & Paris Spleen

  16. #16

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    Interesting.

    I was actually under the impression that Acteur was long gone and only available in a few overpriced vintage bottles (and I recently considered buying one nevertheless). I wore Acteur in the nineties and used to think of it as "bitter honey". I remember trawling perfumeries for the last bottles and testers when it was discontinued (I am sure I was told it was) and keeping my dwindling resources in the fridge for quite some years. This is the first thing I hear about it being reformulated.

    From what I read, I think I'll stay away.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    I've never gotten a major oakmoss note from the original so I don't miss it in the new one. Instead, I get a really dry woody drydown in both versions, with rose and spices blended into it. There's a touch of some sort of fruit but hardly noticeable by the drydown. The new one might be a little weaker and not quite as rich (possibly a little "synthetic" if smelled up close on the skin), but at least they did a decent job of recreating the drydown, rather than something like generic amber and wood, which is so common in reformulations, probably because those are marketed to the "drug store" crowd, unlike Acteur.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Acteur: An interesting reformulation.

    Interesting Bigsly -

    I get Oakmoss both as a note in the base - but the role it plays in Acteur is more significant as a fixative. The warmth of the scent and depth of notes is due to the fact that Oakmoss is incorporated. It is, most definitely, a rich floral and has nice wood (and patchouli) - but what I find is how the Oakmoss establishes a "foundation" for the scent and allows the other key notes to radiate and breathe on your skin. I find this also true in Vintage Azzaro Pour Homme, but the actual note of Oakmoss in the classic Aromatic Fougere is even more prevalent, as well as a wonderful fixative.

    I have to say that the house of Azzaro, with its reformulations of these two scents, has really given it a solid effort. Compared to how some other fragrances have totally been diminished and are nothing but top and middle notes - and smell vaguely similar to their Vintage bottlings...Azzaro has at least made them wearable. Layering is not out of question, as you can blend Vintage and Current formulations, but I only find myself doing this with Azzaro Pour Homme - never Acteur.

    We are the last (or next to last) generation of fragrance lovers who will get to appreciate the beauty of these Vintage fragrances in their true glory with the amazing depth. I feel lucky and blessed for that...as time is ticking.

    Cheers,

    ericrico

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigsly View Post
    I've never gotten a major oakmoss note from the original so I don't miss it in the new one. Instead, I get a really dry woody drydown in both versions, with rose and spices blended into it. There's a touch of some sort of fruit but hardly noticeable by the drydown. The new one might be a little weaker and not quite as rich (possibly a little "synthetic" if smelled up close on the skin), but at least they did a decent job of recreating the drydown, rather than something like generic amber and wood, which is so common in reformulations, probably because those are marketed to the "drug store" crowd, unlike Acteur.
    “Some perfumes are as fragrant as an infant’s flesh, sweet as an oboe’s cry, and greener than the spring; While others are triumphant, decadent or rich; Having the expansion of infinite things, like ambergris and musk, benzoin and frankincense, which sing the transports of the mind and every sense.”

    ― Charles Baudelaire, The Flowers of Evil & Paris Spleen

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