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  1. #1

    Default The Abstract Perfumist

    I've been dabbling with perfume making for a couple years now and lurking here on Basenotes for a little shorter time than that. I have great respect for everyone here and I have gleaned so much information from all the DIYers here, I cannot thank you all enough.

    I have noticed that, like painting, there are many ways to create perfumes. At least, I envision perfumes like paintings, blending scents instead of colours on a liquid canvas. I fancy myself as more of an abstract perfumist than a structured one. With the exception of MSDS and associated safety considerations, I seem to view everything else as guidelines, instead of rules. I like to build a perfume around an idea, and perhaps one or two main notes, and go from there. I have been lucky enough to build a few wearable perfumes right off the hop... and my disasters are sitting, waiting for a rainy day and the right inspiration.

    I'm just curious, what kind of perfumist do you consider yourselves to be?

  2. #2

    Default Re: The Abstract Perfumist

    I consider myself to be a Perfumer (now retired). You are lucky in that you can do what you want and go where your fancy takes you. Most perfumers, including myself, have to work to a specific brief that has been agreed with a specific client, so we cannot do what we want.

  3. #3

    Default Re: The Abstract Perfumist

    A curious perfumer...

    As I learn more, I realise I know less.
    As I create better perfumes, I realise they are not yet my best.
    I realise that to learn is to be humble.
    I realise that my nose can never smell every smell there is to be smelled.
    I realise my learning will never end and this makes me happy.
    I begin to realise how much the masters must know.
    I wish I had begun this when I was younger so that I could have studied in Grasse or the like.
    I seek the most pure and the very best ingredients I can.
    I like to make my own ingredients and to steal smells.

    It is the most wonderful thing I have ever chosen to do. I like the freedom and I equally like some constraints to keep the challenge reined in a bit. I am also lucky to be free of any commercial/financial restraint. However in the same breath, it is harder to start to paint on a white canvas than on a prepared one. I do challenge some of the traditional views of top, middle and base as being a little simplistic. I prefer to think of a perfume as 'what is leaving' and 'what is left' at certain stages during the development. This may be making my journey even more complex, but I will, no doubt, find out the hard way.

    The only way to the finish line is to start at the beginning, except as you get any nearer, the line moves....
    I see that perfumery is a never ending road with many lanes each side to choose to take a detour or not.

  4. #4

    Default Re: The Abstract Perfumist

    i like abstraction in perfumery, too. in the spirit of oscar wilde's essay 'the decay of lying', i think that mimicking nature is boring, and will most likely result in inferior copies anyway. i want my perfumes to be the child of imagination and inspiration.

  5. #5

    Default Re: The Abstract Perfumist

    Quote Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post
    I consider myself to be a Perfumer (now retired). You are lucky in that you can do what you want and go where your fancy takes you. Most perfumers, including myself, have to work to a specific brief that has been agreed with a specific client, so we cannot do what we want.
    Ditto, adding 'in training' after 'perfumer', with a very small p. With a preference for analytical fragrance chemistry & science, functional fragrance and cosmetic science.
    Customized consultancy on olfactory branding, design & research
    I also offer individual online personalised advice on perfume making to anyone eager to learn how to smell and design like a pro
    www.irinatudor.nl

    Social platform & network on all things smelly
    www.somethingsmelly.com


    The facts on IFRA restrictions & EU regulations

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