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  1. #1
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    Default Max Factor Signature For Men



    I was cleaning out a friend's attic a few years ago, and we came across a bottle of this Max Factor for men cologne, which he gave to me. It's a 3 oz spray bottle, about 75% full, and I'm just wondering if anyone has ever heard of, or even seen this cologne before. I can not find any information about this cologne, and my friend is up in years, around 70, and he really could not remember when he picked this up, but he suspects it was either the '50s or '60s. The design seems pretty '60s to me - the big black plastic cap is ridged with concentric circles around the top.

    If anyone knows anything about this fragrance, or has any details about the vintage line of Max Factor colognes, please come forward, I'd love to know more about this. And yes, it still smells good, although a bit musty.

  2. #2
    AromiErotici
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    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    perfumeintelligence has only this : that it was made in 1950. There's no other information I could find on it.

  3. #3

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    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    Hate to resurrect this but think about this. This is not a modern fragrance. It is not unwearable though. It just probably isn't what you want unless nostalgia is the driving factor. Unless you like something that smells vintage that is. I bought two new bottles at a garage sale from a gift set. Like too many from the 60s/70s it starts with a nice crisp accord, citrusy and soapy and clean. But underneath? Musk. Sweet and heavy. Unlike some that you think you like, like Jess Bell Colorado Sage, there is a nice bit of spice and soap to balance the musky base. I don't actually mind this stuff but nothing in it makes it not smell dated. Like others out of the 70s this is dated smelling but not because its aged. Two full unevaporated bottles stored in dark conditions are going to give what this stuff was. A nice soapy, spicy, citrusy accord balances the heavy musk, but it smells outdated. When I smell it, when I put it on or at the drydown I immediately think 70s. It is not untolerable. It is wearable. It just does not smell modern. In unmolested glory, when compared against its period it is an OK cleanish musk based cologne. Others leaned it toward powdery, this one leans soapy. If you took an older formulated cologne, like Royal Copenhagen, that does a citrusy lavender, leans powdery, then goes to sweet musky honey type notes, this goes on citrus and soapy, and goes musky and spicy. Heavy enough on soapy spicy notes that it all evens out. Outdated by all means but wearable if its your taste.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    That's a blast from before my past!

  5. #5

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    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    It shares elements with Canoe and other old popular colognes trying to get down to what exactly it smells like, its not easy. I only put on a dab yesterday just for testing purposes, maybe I'll give it a wear today and see how it plays out over the course of an entire day. Just smells dated IMHO. I suppose you could wear it if you aimed for nostalgia. For $1 for two bottles I'm willing to use it once in a while for a change.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    It just smells like a more sophisticated Aqua Velva Musk to me. Nothing special, just a little heavier on the soapy spices and musks. I guess it's still wearable, if you like AV Musk.

  7. #7

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    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    I can see the AV Musk comparison. I wore it to work yesterday to see if it would get any sort of response, but narry a word. My take on that is that it isn't too unusual and isn't good or bad. If I wear something bad it gets noticed, if I wear something outdated it gets noticed, if I wear something good if it gets noticed. If it doesn't get mentioned its run of the mill. Personally I think it smells outdated. Maybe its just me but I've got 8oz of it now so I'll have to wear it every so often.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    I'm 52 and I do not remember this.....Gary

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    I'm not a huge fan of it either, although it's not bad. Definitely outdated. I felt the same way about AV Musk back a few years ago when I bought a bottle, although the AV version suffers from that headspacey "cologney" vibe of too much alcohol and synthetics. I've had this bottle for about five years now, and haven't really worn it. I gave it a test-strip sniff again yesterday. It's much better than any aftershave, there's definitely a sweetness and a spiciness that comes from ingredients that are probably outlawed in today's frags. It has a depth and clarity to it that is refreshing, but unfortunately this entire scent profile is not something I generally go for, nor apparently does anyone else. I can count on no hands how many times I've smelled something like this on anyone else lately. It's an interesting scent, though, because it gives me insight into what some men smelled like back in the 1950s.

  10. #10

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    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    I'm sure such a fragrance profile was well available into the 1970s. You can see similar notes on various Avon scents, it shares elements with Royal Copenhagen, AV Musk, Canoe etc. Seems to have a dirty lavender or something in there, lots of musk, soapy and spicy. Nothing really unusual for the timeframe. The thing is if you wear it now you'll know its outdated and unless you're some 80 year old guy, if you're wearing it you're doing it for that purpose because its outdated quality distinguishes it from everything else. The opening notes are totally out of place for a modern fragrance. The soapy musky stuff that follows is anyones guess. I don't find it offensive, I think it smells similar to a couple of other 70s fragrances. I don't mind the soapy notes. I just think the whole thing blends together all wrong to be worn in a modern setting unless it is some sort of nostaliga you're aiming for in your distinguishing scent.

    Whereas Royal Copenhagen ends up as a strongly powdery scent, Canoe, and Clubman turn into what are your typical barbershop scents sweet and vanilla type, this lingers as a weird soapy musk. It doesn't seem to have that timeless quality that Jovan Musk has perhaps because it is too sweet and heavy, perhaps it leans too sharply to floral (which I actually think it does). The dash of medincal doesn't help in this case.

    I think this is why it hasn't survived to the present. Pretty much everyone can tolerate a barbershop or a scent that becomes or is heavily powdery, but a weird floral musk with soapy qualities doesn't aling with the current sought after fragrances, it doesn't have that timeless appeal. Those of the era that did survive lean heavily in a given direction and are not some odd amalgam of the then desired notes.

    There is a lot of weird stuff from back in the day and it ranges from good to bad. You've got ones you wonder why they're not still around like Trouble, which I always thought was a nice refreshing aftershave. You've got ones like Jess Bell's Colorado Sage that after putting it on the top notes are pretty darn good leaving you wanting more until you're leveled by an awfully strong sweet character that smells terribly outdated. You've got ones that survived because they were not to trying on accepted themes. Do a search on ebay and you'll find scores of long forgtton colognes, and if you're the curious type they're fun to try but I wouldn't open my wallet at insane prices unless you found a gem (some oldies go for a lot of $). I buy well preserved ones when I come across them at yard sales or thrift stores for curiousity. They're fun to wear because chances are you'll be the only one wearing them.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Max Factor Signature For Men

    I used Signature for over ten years until it went off the market and never found it to be "musky";if anything, it is rather "perfumy", similar to Trouble perfume. Signature was a definate "chick magnate"- My female friends would very often use mine in place of their perfume and many purchased their own bottle. Because eo many "men's fragrances begin as a perfume I had often thought Sinature was an off shoot of a Max Factor perfume...but I could never verify that theory.
    The one thing that really stands out is it's "pop"; as a young and tender male in my early 20's I used it after shaving...Only Old Spice had more "zing".
    I learned a trick that I use to this day...Use a light weight after shave with the cologne to reduce it's potency. When I use a strong cologne or perfume (I was the first one to use Obsession.) like Trouble, to reduce it's potency, I will put some Aqua Velva in my palm and then add a small bit of cologne or perfume <When using perfume, wet your face and hands with water before using any fragrances> Or get a bottle of denatured alcohol...but be prepared for a real "zing"after you shave. Enjoy.

    - - - Updated - - -

    I used Signature for over ten years until it went off the market and never found it to be "musky";if anything, it is rather "perfumy", similar to Trouble perfume. Signature was a definate "chick magnate"- My female friends would very often use mine in place of their perfume and many purchased their own bottle. Because eo many "men's fragrances begin as a perfume I had often thought Sinature was an off shoot of a Max Factor perfume...but I could never verify that theory.
    The one thing that really stands out is it's "pop"; as a young and tender male in my early 20's I used it after shaving...Only Old Spice had more "zing".
    I learned a trick that I use to this day...Use a light weight after shave with the cologne to reduce it's potency. When I use a strong cologne or perfume (I was the first one to use Obsession.) like Trouble, to reduce it's potency, I will put some Aqua Velva in my palm and then add a small bit of cologne or perfume <When using perfume, wet your face and hands with water before using any fragrances> Or get a bottle of denatured alcohol...but be prepared for a real "zing"after you shave. Enjoy.

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