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Thread: Perfume oil

  1. #1
    Basenotes Junkie Curly11's Avatar
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    Default Perfume oil

    Hello-

    I'm a novice and want to blend my own perfume oils. I've been reading as much as time permits, mostly online, and have a general idea about the process. My confusion is about how to convert percentages into drops. I don't have a scale and need to figure out the number of drops needed for the base, middle, and top notes. Most of the resources give percentages of those parts of the total blend. I know that one ml equals 20 drops. My blend will equal a total of 60 drops; that should equal 3 ml, right? So, if I have 20 percent base, 50 percent middle, and 15-20 percent top, how do I figure the number of drops. Probably I'll add 20 drops of carrier oil in addition. Thanks in advance for any and all advice.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Perfume oil

    Even though measuring by volume is not a totally accurate measure it will probably suffice in the very beginning. It's recommended to dilute the EOs before blending to 10-20% in carrier oil or alcohol. You can use a disposable pipette to measure out 1-2mls of EO then add enough carrier oil or alcohol to make it up to 10 mls in total. Giving you a dilution 10-20%.

    The rest is quite simple.

    20% of 60 drops is 12 drops
    50% of 60 drops is 30 drops etc...

    Your final blend will then already be diluted to 10-20%. if you found it too strong you could add 60 drops of your carrier and then have a 5-10% dilution.

  3. #3
    Basenotes Junkie Curly11's Avatar
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    Default Re: Perfume oil

    Thank you, ClaraAus.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Perfume oil

    Just another note that carrier oils and alcohol do not mix but essential oils are soluble in either. So you have to decide from the outset whether you will make an alcohol or oil based perfume. Whatever you dilute your essential oils in will be what you have to use for your perfume base.

  5. #5
    Basenotes Junkie Curly11's Avatar
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    Default Re: Perfume oil

    Thanks again.

    I had read elsewhere to mix the EOs, allow them to cure for about a week, and then add the carrier oil. After the addition of the carrier oil, the entire blend is to cure for 1-3 months. At this time, I do not have perfumer's alcohol so that is why I am going to work with carrier oil. Eventually I will obtain some perfumer's alcohol, but I just received some new absolutes and oils yesterday and am eager to mix them. I purchased my oils and absolutes from Eden Botanicals and also received a
    few samples. I want to blend orange blossom, rose, carnation, sweet orange, tonka bean, rosewood, and amyris. If you have recommendations for additional fragrances, please let me know. Can you recommend a helpful book for beginners?

  6. #6

    Default Re: Perfume oil

    There is another thread already with book recommendations, just search for it. I don't have any recommendations as I'm beginner myself and got the info I posted above from reading this forum and advice given to me. I plan to work with oil based perfumes rather than alcohol because I prefer perfume thats dabbed rather than sprayed. From what I can gather your absolutes are alcohol rather than oil soluble, you may be able to mix them with your carrier oil with DPG ( dipropylene glycol) which is an oil miscible alcohol. Its quite cheap and easy to buy.

    I recently posted a thread titled DIY naturals kit, you may want to have a read of that as several kind folks here posted lots of recommendations or basic notes for me. I'm sure it won't be long before more knowlegable forumites offer you their help as well.

    The reason its recommended to dilute your EOs before blending is so that you can smell the nuances of each one as you blend. EOs neat are so powerful they dampen your ability to discern the entire aroma. You won't get a true sense of your scent as you blend if they are not. It's also a way to limit wastage of your expensive materials if you are discarding a dilution rather than a concentrate. Try it for yourself, put some undiluted EO on a smelling strip and then a dilute of the same oil on another one. The diluted EO will smell fuller and more pleasing. I learnt this when I bought some very expensive pure neroli oil, it smelt acrid and horrible in the bottle nothing like neroli at all until it was diluted down to about 5% then it blossomed into that gorgeous flower.
    Last edited by ClaraAus; 20th October 2012 at 05:33 AM.

  7. #7
    Basenotes Junkie Curly11's Avatar
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    Default Re: Perfume oil

    Yes, I know what you mean about the neat oil vs. the diluted solution. The carnation absolute is solid and smells not unpleasant, but not like carnations, either. Will check the other threads for more advice.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Perfume oil

    Quote Originally Posted by Curly11 View Post
    Thanks again.

    Can you recommend a helpful book for beginners?
    I've posted on my blog about books I recommend, but my top recommendation for you is Tony Curtis and David G Williams’ An Introduction to Perfumery - details on the blog.
    A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person.”
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation I’m happy to quote: if you want free advice, that’s what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  9. #9
    Basenotes Junkie Curly11's Avatar
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    Default Re: Perfume oil

    Thank you, Chris. I'll look at your blog for the book. Probably I'll need to purchase books about formulating from Amazon or Ebay because my local library and bookstores do not carry much that will be helpful to me.

    - - - Updated - - -

    O.K., so I learned something interesting about tonka bean absolute today. It quickly solidifies even after being heated. I heated it very slowly in a double-boiler type set-up, and had to work very quickly to get just ONE drop. I have carnation absolute that is also solid in its bottle. My guess is, for ease and convenience, it would be best to put those two absolutes into solution. What is the best liquid for putting carnation and tonka bean absolutes into solution and keeping them liquid? I have 3.7ml of each (well, the tonka bean has been diminished a little). Any recommendations?

  10. #10

    Default Re: Perfume oil

    Absolutes are alcohol soluble, ethanol, possibly also DPG ( although I've not used this myself yet).

  11. #11
    Basenotes Junkie Curly11's Avatar
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    Default Re: Perfume oil

    I'm going to buy both fractionated coconut oil and alcohol. It looks as though you like working with alcohol. Do you use perfumer's alcohol or 190 proof alcoho?

  12. #12

    Default Re: Perfume oil

    I don't use alcohol at all. But you need it if you work with absolutes as I've read here they won't dissolve in oil.
    Last edited by ClaraAus; 23rd October 2012 at 12:26 AM.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Perfume oil

    All absolutes should dissolve in ethanol as ethanol is the final solvent used in their production, however that final stage is occasionally done with hot ethanol so you can sometimes struggle to get them into solution in cold ethanol (and for safety reasons you should never heat ethanol at home unless you have special equipment to contain the explosive vapour).

    Most absolutes will also dissolve in isopropyl myristate.

    Generally speaking it is best to avoid heating absolutes - the reason they are produced is to capture those elements of the scent that would be lost in the boiling inherent to essential oil production - if you must heat them it is best done quickly and briefly.

    Also notice that if you chose to work in an oil carrier (like jojoba or fractionated coconut oil (aka capric/caprylic trigyceride)) rather than ethanol, you can't use ethanol at all because the two don't mix.
    A person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person.”
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation I’m happy to quote: if you want free advice, that’s what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  14. #14
    Basenotes Junkie Curly11's Avatar
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    Default Re: Perfume oil

    Thanks, Chris. Is it best to scrape the solid absolute out of the bottle in order to dissolve it in isopropyl myristate?

    I had wondered about whether or not an ethanol dissolved absolute would mix into an oil-based fragrance. Does isopropyl myristate mix with fractionated coconut oil?

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