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  1. #1

    Default perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Hi,

    Can anyone suggest some perfume formulas that would use perfumers alcohol, glycerin, distilled water and the fragrance oils?

    I want to use between 10-15% fragrance oil

    Thanks so much!

  2. #2

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Why would you want to put glycerine in it? You will create all sorts of solubility problems and make your fragrance sticky on the skin to boot.

    Distilled water is also not necessary but with 10-15% fragrance materials you could probably get away with 5% water to make it a bit cheaper to produce, depending on what's in your perfumer's alcohol. If your perfumers alcohol contains isopropyl myristate I wouldn't risk adding water as it's likely to go cloudy.

    Also be aware that you need to use pure or near-pure fragrance materials for this to work - pure essential oils and aroma chemicals rather than the sort of fragrance oil often sold for use directly and confusingly often called 'pure perfume oil' by those who sell it - it's really at best 30% fragrance materials, with the rest some kind of carrier oil that may or may not dissolve in ethanol.
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  3. #3

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    My fragrance oil supplier suggested the following percentages for the perfume I am planning to create:
    Fragrance: 10.48%
    Alcohol SDA-40: 79.00%
    DiH2O: 10.52%

    And I was reading the mixed reviews of adding dipropylene glycol or a glycerin for the scent to last longer on the skin. It seems the consensus on basenotes is that dipropylene glycol with do nothing to help with scent lasting on skin???? but with many online searches the consensus is that it does help with staying power....really confused on this one.

    My fragrance oil is pure and does not have any additives or carrier oils added to it.

    Thanks so much for any advice.

  4. #4

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Oh Gawd, this again. I don't care what anyone has read, all I know is what I have experienced in over 30 years as a perfumer. To my knowledge DPG is not used as a fixative in Perfumery.

    If you are unsure, why not experiment yourself? Take two samples of your fragrance mix; to one add some DPG (about 10.0%), leave the other alone. Dip your two samples and compare strength, and change in odour over a couple of hours. Should you wish, extend this over a couple of days. Smell, at first, every 30 minutes, then after an hour or so, smell every hour. Make notes, and come to a conclusion.

  5. #5

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Maybe we should go back to basics:

    Perfume is a mixture of a fragrance compound and alcohol. You don't add a fixative afterwards to a fragrance, the fragrance compound needs to have enough fixative power of its own. So in general: don't add glycerin, DPG, DEP, IPM, glucose syrup, BB, Herculyn D or whatever substance to your perfume as a fixative, purchase a good fragrance compound instead.

    When you paint the walls and the rain whashes the paint down you could spray a fixative (like a lacquer) over the wall, it might help, will affect the appearance, but it would be much better to use water resistant paint in the first place.

  6. #6

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    janmeut, you are exactly right. Thank you.

  7. #7

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Totally agree with Jan and David;
    however, there seems to be one "additive" called Glucam P-20, which acts as a post-added fixative for top/middle notes:

    Quote PerfumersApprentice: "This is a material used for the fixing of top and some middle notes. For example, experiments performed in house show that Sweet Orange essential oil (one of the most fleeting of scents- usually lasting only two minutes on the skin) was increased to last half an hour or more on the skin.
    Use up to 5% of your fragrance formula concentrate, but experiment! Using too much will "flatten" a fragrance."


    Website: http://www.lubrizol.com/PersonalCare...lucamP-20.html

  8. #8

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Thanks JSPARLA for reminding peeps of this one.

    And Still, adding glycerin is supremely BAD.
    but, "It's on the Internet, so it must be true!"

    WRONG!!!
    Paul Kiler
    PK Perfumes
    http://www.PKPERFUMES.com
    Gold Medal for "Best Aroma"; Los Angeles Artisan Fragrance Salon

  9. #9

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Quote Originally Posted by jsparla View Post
    Totally agree with Jan and David;
    however, there seems to be one "additive" called Glucam P-20, which acts as a post-added fixative for top/middle notes:

    Quote PerfumersApprentice: "This is a material used for the fixing of top and some middle notes. For example, experiments performed in house show that Sweet Orange essential oil (one of the most fleeting of scents- usually lasting only two minutes on the skin) was increased to last half an hour or more on the skin.
    Use up to 5% of your fragrance formula concentrate, but experiment! Using too much will "flatten" a fragrance."


    Website: http://www.lubrizol.com/PersonalCare...lucamP-20.html
    It's certainly true that Glucam P-20 works as a fixative and is more-or-less odourless, but I still don't recommend adding separately - if I use it I build it in to the fragrance formula - just like benzyl benzoate, which is also an almost odourless fixative.

    Any fixative will have a differential impact on some components of the fragrance - so you may need to adjust other parts of the formula to compensate for it's effect - if you add some at the end the resulting fragrance will likely have more lasting power but may not smell the same as it did before you added it, even though the additive itself is odourless.

    I realise that's counter-intuitive but is essentially the same thing that David and others have describe in relation to materials they are anosmic to: even if you can't smell Benzyl salicylate on it's own you can detect the smoothing effect it has when it's in the blend. Hope that helps.
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  10. #10

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    I would like to find a recipe for Dior's Tendre Poison?

  11. #11

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Ok, so I'll hijack this one as well - since I'm having some trouble with my supposed-to-be base notes..
    Thought of trying those almost-odorless fixatives, but I don't have any.. I know benzyl-benzoate,
    benzyl-cinnamate and cynnamyl-cinnamate.. Is there anything else I should consider buying to fix
    things?
    Thanks

  12. #12

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Quote Originally Posted by Nizan View Post
    Ok, so I'll hijack this one as well - since I'm having some trouble with my supposed-to-be base notes..
    Thought of trying those almost-odorless fixatives, but I don't have any.. I know benzyl-benzoate,
    benzyl-cinnamate and cynnamyl-cinnamate.. Is there anything else I should consider buying to fix
    things?
    Thanks
    A couple of much-underrated fixatives with low-odour that you could consider are IPM and Hedione: they both have a wide-spectrum fixative effect and IPM is as good as odourless, while Hedione has a distinct odour it is easily pushed in the direction of other things itís used with.
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  13. #13

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    ...while Hedione has a distinct odour it is easily pushed in the direction of other things itís used with.
    Is that what is meant when its called an exalter? I assumed it meant it provided a kind of harmony...making other notes "better" without taking over. Is that sort-of correct?

    I've been wanting to try using it, but was hesitant that it might really add jasmine as a note that might overpower (nothing's wrong with jasmine per se, just not where it's not needed).
    Last edited by Meriem; 18th March 2014 at 05:44 PM. Reason: HTML fix

  14. #14

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Quote Originally Posted by Meriem View Post
    Is that what is meant when its called an exalter? I assumed it meant it provided a kind of harmony...making other notes "better" without taking over. Is that sort-of correct?

    I've been wanting to try using it, but was hesitant that it might really add jasmine as a note that might overpower (nothing's wrong with jasmine per se, just not where it's not needed).
    Yes thatís pretty much it - exalt also often implies an improvement in diffusion and radiant certainly carries that implication.

    I wouldnít worry about introducing jasmine with hedione: thereís a good reason itís in 80% of the perfumes on the market, you can use it with almost anything and itís especially effective with citrus as well as many other florals besides jasmine. You can use anywhere from 1-50% of the formula too so well worth experimenting with.

    For even bigger impact you could also try Hedione HC, which I especially like in more masculine compositions.
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  15. #15

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Thanks for explaining further. This is clearly something I do need to experiment with.

  16. #16

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Hmm.. too scared to use hedione - it always takes things to unexpected places..
    I'm a little confused about IPM - I thought that the bottom line was not to think of
    it as a fixative..
    Anyhow, I just ordered some cinnamyl cinnamate from Adam.. And some ambermax

  17. #17

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Quote Originally Posted by Nizan View Post
    Hmm.. too scared to use hedione - it always takes things to unexpected places..
    I'm a little confused about IPM - I thought that the bottom line was not to think of
    it as a fixative..
    Anyhow, I just ordered some cinnamyl cinnamate from Adam.. And some ambermax
    I thought I'd let you know I've tried the hedione in different amounts in both things I'm trying to make, and I think (so far...) it's nothing to be too frightened of. When I opened it, I recognized it immediately from umpteen products (especially from a coworker's perfume, which must have it as a major note); it really does have a distinct scent (though, curiously, a friend who sniffed it couldn't actually smell it at all.) But when I added it, I really couldn't smell it in either mix -- except that the other elements really were immediately fattened up a bit. I think it's what's making the citrus-based mix I'm making, where I used a bit more of it, smell so juicy. We'll see, though, in a few weeks after it's all settled and blended.

  18. #18

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Hi,

    I am new to the forum, doing natural cosmetics since a decade and now creating my 100% natural perfume brand. I would like to know if any of you has ever tried glycerin plant extracts? I am doing my perfumes in a non traditional way using glycerin extracts from mushrooms, seaweed and fruits to provide with complementary naturals scents unavailable in the form of essential oils, CO2 or absolute. Because I prefer oily solutions up to 50%, I find that the small % of glycerin is perfectly ok. The perfumes are not meant to do a big sillage, more to be close to the skin and they last for a day and are less harsh on the skin for allergic people. I also add my own tinctures as I use indigenous plants and fruits, including indigenous carrier oils that all combine to create the fragrance. My perfumes are cloudy and I do not intend to have them transparent, one has to shake the bottle before applying to realize the emulsion and they are hstoring well for a year which is sufficient as I make them fresh but I am working now on packaging and new website. Would be glad to get your experience in pros and cons and thanks for all the information provided on basenotes.

    (sorry I replied to the wrong link before, just getting used to basenotes)
    Last edited by lpp; 24th March 2014 at 08:58 PM.

  19. #19

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    So, We all say: "Don't Use Glycerin in any Perfume". However I have no clue about glycerin based extracts.

    I'm not quite sure how to interpret that comment, "they... are less harsh on the skin for allergic people."

    Allergies come in many shapes and sizes, and using all natural ingredients is actually the opposite to me of what it seems like you are trying to do... The more the molecules, the more chance of allergic reactions. Natural have more molecules that synthetics, and there seems to have the assumption that synthetics are bad/evil, and naturals are good and sweet. This is not accurate in either case.

    PK
    Paul Kiler
    PK Perfumes
    http://www.PKPERFUMES.com
    Gold Medal for "Best Aroma"; Los Angeles Artisan Fragrance Salon

  20. #20

    Default Re: perfume formulas/recipes using glycerin

    Yes sure I didn't express it right. Allergies can be induced by natural products due to the amount of allergens which to some extent can be monitored and limited by the very small amounts used and by getting information on the specific allergy terrain of the person using. What I meant is less alcohol is better tolerated for people with sensitive skin or asthmatics who react to high levels of alcohol.
    I am a phytotherapist as well so quite aware of the healing and poisoning potential of essential oils and extracts. However, although I limit to the maximum the use of essential oils in my cosmetic range in favor of beneficial carrier oil, for the perfume (which as roll on oil based) I cannot follow IFRA regulations as it wouldn't be perfumes at all.
    NadiaZ

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