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  1. #1

    Default The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    I have seen many of the frags that have been around for a long time described as classics by some. The same frag may get called old fashioned dated, or "smells like an old man" by other people. I assume that this has to do with whether they like the scent or not, but I find myself using the terms interchangeably.

    Just as a quick example, I will use Aramis. It was launched 7 years before I was born, my dad wore it (and probably still does on occasion) so I guess it could technically be called old fashioned, but to me it's a classic because I like it a lot and it's just plain classy.

    Knize Ten is another, probably even better example. That stuff is almost 100 years old! I personally love it, but a century can surely be called old fashioned.

    No point in my rambling I suppose, I was just wondering where other BN'ers fall on the subject.

  2. #2

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    I'd consider a true classic to be timeless and thus not old fashioned.

  3. #3

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    For me:
    Knize Ten (1924) - Classic
    Grey Flannel (1975) - Old Fashioned

  4. #4
    hednic's Avatar
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    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rüssel View Post
    I'd consider a true classic to be timeless and thus not old fashioned.
    This

  5. #5

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    A 'Classic' scent is an older fragrance that large numbers of people give praise to and or still wear so that insecure people who have no confidence in their ability to decide for themselves whether or not something is good or bad can feel safe wearing it. An old fashioned scent is not.

  6. #6

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    An example explains the best way...
    Let's take Leonard Pour Homme - from 1980. A good scent imo, but not a classic, afaik.
    But think about Dior Jules from the same year - definitely a classic!
    "Le parfum est la musique du corps"
    (Marcel Rochas)

  7. #7

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Old fashioned = Purple velvet flares
    Classic = Tweed jacket

    I don't think there are any old fashioned scents, just timeless classics, modern classics and 'meh'.

  8. #8

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Can't a classic scent also be old-fashioned? I guess "old-fashioned" could be pretty subjective and dependent on taste. I'd need a better definition.

    Knize Ten is an interesting example. Classic, I'd say yes. Old-fashioned? Sure, why not? But fashions change and old becomes new again, so maybe for me "classic" is something that stands the test of time and changing fashions.

  9. #9
    Overcome By Fumes
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    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    If it's old and I like it, classic. If it's old and I don't like it, old-fashioned (or out-dated, or some less glowing term suggesting age and lack of current appeal). Pretty simple.

  10. #10

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    The difference is personal taste.

  11. #11

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    "Classic" is just a polite way of saying "old fashioned".

  12. #12
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    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Classic = timeless. E.g. Shalimar
    Old fashioned = outdated. E.g. Antaeus (with all due respect)

  13. #13

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    As these answers demonstrate there is no objective difference.

    You could say a classic scent is one which transcends the tastes and fashions of its era, or defines them, and remains wearable even many years after it was made while an old-fashioned scent is a product of past tastes and fashions, and thus incompatible with the current asthetic.

    Applying criteria like this to a scent objectively is difficult. Moreover even if you are being impartial there will still always be many who will disagree.

  14. #14

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Quote Originally Posted by docluv45 View Post
    If it's old and I like it, classic. If it's old and I don't like it, old-fashioned (or out-dated, or some less glowing term suggesting age and lack of current appeal). Pretty simple.
    I like this one.

  15. #15

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    My take on this, using a market based approach -

    Classic - still often sells at a good price in department stores (which means it must still have a big fan base) or exclusive stores (has some snob value) . Aramis fits this criterion.

    Old fashioned - a scent over 30 years old that doesn't have much of a following, because of a general perception that it's use-by date has come and gone. Can often be found heavily discounted, or just manufactured to be sold at cheap prices. The fan base have nearly all passed away. Dana English Leather comes to mind as such an example, while Lagerfeld Classic is making its way there.

    Regards,
    Renato

  16. #16

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    A classic scent is timeless. It never gets old!

    An "old fashioned" fragrance is just old and doesn't relate to later generations.

  17. #17

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    That's sums it up. Old-fashion-ed is related to fashion, the frequently changing diktat by designer corporations telling us what to wear and use. A classic transcends the fleeting fashions.

  18. #18

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rüssel View Post
    I'd consider a true classic to be timeless and thus not old fashioned.
    I agree

    From my experience, at 20 years old in 1988 when Fahrenheit was released, my nose was not ready or could even handle this fragrance. Tastes change, especially in this hobby of ours. Fast forward to today, I find now I adore it and I don't feel out of place wearing it. I am very happy to see it still going strong and readily available despite whatever reformulation it has under-gone.

    It is a classic and still just as relevant today

  19. #19
    Dependent bigsteve's Avatar
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    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Easy. If a frag has been around for some years, and a person likes it, they call it "classic."
    If they don't like it, they call it "old fashioned," "smells like old man," and similar nonsense.
    I wear what I like, without regard to the silly labels.

  20. #20

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Quote Originally Posted by rbaker View Post
    That's sums it up. Old-fashion-ed is related to fashion, the frequently changing diktat by designer corporations telling us what to wear and use. A classic transcends the fleeting fashions.
    I'm glad someone pointed out the use of the word fashion. Fashion meaning a trend with short term popularity.

    Based on this, I can think of 2 ways to define a Classic. Either something you know it is not from the here and now, but you really cannot place when in the past it is from and it does not seem out of place in the here and now, or something that is associated with a certain time, but whose popularity has endured at a pretty high and stable level ever since even after what is fashionable has moved on (so it did not fall "out of fashion", just sidestepped fashion altogether).

  21. #21

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Classic is something that will always be in style. Old fashion is something that is outdated and rarely used.

  22. #22

    Default Re: The difference between a "classic" scent, and an "old fashioned" one?

    Classic mezns most people agree that its worthstill keeping or something of pleasing like a pice of art thats now worth lots but its still old.
    Any opinions I post here about frags only reflect MY PERSONAL TASTE and only my personal preference which could change at any moment.

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