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  1. #1

    Default Jean Carles on base notes and modifiers in cologne...

    I have been a long-time lurker and just recently decided to get involved. A while back a read "A Method of Creation and Perfumery," by Jean Carles. While it was written in the 1960's, I still find a lot of what he explains very useful. However, my one question concerns his view on the composition of colognes and the inclusion on base and modifier notes.

    He writes, "Indeed, conventional colognes are predominantly toilet goods that should have an odor lacking in tenacity, either because said odor should be just sufficient to add to the overall pleasant feeling of cleanliness, or because it should not detrimentally affect one's regular perfume. It is understood that modifiers and base notes may be added to cologne formulations, for the purpose of imparting more lasting properties to such compositions, but, nevertheless, such materials should always be used with moderation in colognes." source: http://www.perfumersapprentice.com/p...n/carles3b.pdf

    What exactly does he mean by this? Is he saying that a solid base accord is not somehow necessary in modern colognes? Or do I not understand what he means by the term "cologne"?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Jean Carles on base notes and modifiers in cologne...

    Jean Carles is using the term 'cologne' in its specific sense, meaning a fragrance that is comprised largely of top notes. As opposed to the term 'perfume' which refers to a fragrance constructed from the traditional pyramid of top, middle and base notes. These days people use the term 'cologne' erroneously to refer to any kind of fragrance, particularly men's fragrances.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Jean Carles on base notes and modifiers in cologne...

    Quote Originally Posted by Trufflehunter View Post
    Jean Carles is using the term 'cologne' in its specific sense, meaning a fragrance that is comprised largely of top notes. As opposed to the term 'perfume' which refers to a fragrance constructed from the traditional pyramid of top, middle and base notes. These days people use the term 'cologne' erroneously to refer to any kind of fragrance, particularly men's fragrances.

    So what then was the use of this "cologne"? Was it used in conjunction with perfumes?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Jean Carles on base notes and modifiers in cologne...

    Welcome!

    To add to trufflehunter's explanation, remember than way back perfumes were typically composed and intended to be used in what today we specifically call parfum or extrait de parfum concentration. "Colognes" were intended as fresheners to be splashed on with abandon as the need arose.

    The old, traditional Eau de cologne is a fleeting, citrus based water, which, in previous centuries, was used for all purposes (including mouth rinse) and by the gallons (by those who could afford it).

    cacio
    Last edited by cacio; 29th December 2012 at 08:23 PM.

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