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  1. #1

    Default What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    I recall Chris saying he used a synthetic instead of grapefruit essential oil because the latter ages badly. What is a good replacement, or what are the options, please?

  2. #2

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Depends upon White or Pink Grapefruit...

    BUT Methyl Pamplemousse is a good start...

  3. #3

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    yes, look for a pamplemousse scent. Pamplemousse means grapefruit I believe.

  4. #4

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Base your replacement on a mixture of Orange and Lemon oils; plus a very small amount of Thiolimonene (Grapefruit Mercaptan). This is also known as Corps 1490, Grapelione or Zestoril. Be very careful with this material. Only use it as a 0.1% or even 0.01% solution. Be careful when ordering it (if possible in solution) and when handling it. This stuff is very, very strong. Methyl Pamplemousse is also a very useful material and somewhat easier to handle. There are other aromachemicals and bases you can choose. Google Givaudan, IFF, and Firmenich for ideas.

  5. #5

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Paul, thank you.

    Walkdogg, thank you too. I was asking about ingredients, not finished perfumes. The clue is that the post appears in the DIY sub-forum. But perhaps you access from a different page.

    My grapefruit oil is down to its last drops, getting old, and smells more of orange than of grapefruit. Apparently the orange smell comes from limonene, the major component of grapefruit oil, and the 'grapefruit' smell comes from a trace sulfur compound. Perhaps it's the same compound whose breaking down can cause the bad eggs smell that Chris mentioned, though I don't notice that coming from my oil. Methyl pamplemousse (grapefruit acetal) sounds interesting as a non-naturally occurring substance. I'm not sure I can easily get hold of it--Perfumer's Apprentice won't ship it overseas--but one problem at a time--it was the information I was after.

    - - - Updated - - -

    David, thank you, I'll look into that. It seems grapefruit mercaptan does occur in some plants but not in grapefruit? (This from The Good Scents Company site.) I wonder whether there's an essential oil that does 'grapefruit' better than grapefruit. Not that I have a 'natural' hang-up but I routinely order essential oils for general household purposes so they're more convenient to obtain.

  6. #6
    Basenotes Member Luís Carlos's Avatar
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    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Ellena recommends sweet orange + Rhubofix (Firmenich)... I read it in some interview. I've never tried it...

    Add Dimethyl Octenone to your list of possibilities.

  7. #7

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Natural Citrus oils should be replaced on their one year anniversary, because of changes that occur in the oils.

  8. #8

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    I have never seen the point of using Grapefruit oil. It seems to be even less stable than most other citrus oils, and the quality is often very poor. Why buy diluted Orange oil when you can make your own Grapefruit substitute. Grapefruit Mercaptan does occur in Grapefruit Oil.

    Another chemical I would consider is called Oxane.

  9. #9

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    "BUT Methyl Pamplemousse is a good start..."

    Methyl Pamplemousse!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    http://www.aromatisches-blog.de
    Here`s something for the tip of your nose!

  10. #10

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alysoun View Post
    I recall Chris saying he used a synthetic instead of grapefruit essential oil because the latter ages badly. What is a good replacement, or what are the options, please?
    Sorry to come to this so late. I did say that indeed for the reasons Paul and David have given, plus the fact that grapefruit, unlike most citrus, can break down to give sulphurous notes that are particularly unpleasant.

    I use the Firmenich Grapefruit, product number 015794 R. It's a really excellent base and all the difficult stuff David mentions about Grapefruit Mercaptan (and Methyl pamplemousse, nootkatone and other exotic chemicals that are needed to replicate this particular oil successfully) has been done for you by expert perfumers.

    In particular I really can't recommend anyone buys Grapefruit Mercaptan in its pure form: it is incredibly powerful, thought to be the molecule that is detected by the human nose at the lowest threshold of any substance, it smells like burnt rubber until massively diluted and then it smells like a gas leak. A tiny spill will render your workplace or home foul smelling for ages - best left to professionals in my view!
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

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    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation I’m happy to quote: if you want free advice, that’s what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  11. #11

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Thanks to all for the recommendations, and the cautions. To diverge slightly: can you suggest any books or other reading on the subject of safe and otherwise sound laboratory practice, especially in the home? I did chemistry at school long ago but I don't think I ever took in the practical side.

  12. #12

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Zubrick's The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual is pretty good.

    Google should turn up a PDF

    -

  13. #13

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skelly View Post
    Zubrick's The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual is pretty good.

    Google should turn up a PDF

    -
    Thank you. I'll read that to start with.

  14. #14

    Default Re: What synthetic replaces grapefruit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Skelly View Post
    Zubrick's The Organic Chem Lab Survival Manual is pretty good.

    Google should turn up a PDF

    -
    Thank you. I'll read that to start with.

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