Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Mad Scientist?

  1. #1
    Basenotes Plus

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    70

    Default Mad Scientist?

    So here I am, 144 bottles of fragrance oils and 52 bottles of aroma molecules...and wondering how I'll ever come up with combinations that make scents

    Seriously, for instance, what can one do with Hedione? What to combine it with? And on and on. How many drops to how many drops of alcohol or DI-propylene glycol?
    Ok, I'm not that confused but maybe.
    Are there any publications or places that have any "recipes" for the aroma molecules? I realize that everyone has their secrets but there must be some starting points?

    I did find something that suggested adding equal parts of Iso E Super, Hedione, Galaxolide and Methyl ionone...and it actually smelled like something

    TIA

  2. #2

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    http://www.perfumersearch.com/ you will find loads of info with this tool. ALso, search the stickies in this forum.
    You can check out my fragrances at www.garnerjames.com
    While I work on the website, you can email me for any inquiries at james@garnerjames.com

  3. #3
    Basenotes Plus

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    Thank you wooznib, looks like a great place to check out.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    Numberz, Using the Perfumers search aforementioned, one can search for a material, say "Hedione". One would then find this link:
    http://www.thegoodscentscompany.com/data/rw1015272.html

    If you look closely for the GREEN BAR, then you will find theFlavor/Fragrance Formulas pertinent and containing that particular element. These formulas are a gift from heaven to learn from... and a very recent addition to The Good Scents Company's website database.

    You can also find formulas around the internet when googling different elements' names, in books found online, and in Patent documents.

    Welcome to RESEARCH!!!
    Paul Kiler
    PK Perfumes
    http://www.PKPERFUMES.com
    Gold Medal for "Best Aroma"; Los Angeles Artisan Fragrance Salon

  5. #5
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    105

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    There's a published cologne in Chris' spread sheet for calculating the weight of dilutions in a formula on his blog.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    Hi Numberz,

    it's really tough to find real usable formulations on the internet; like everyone, even the amateurs, are guarding them with their lives ;-) It's a pity, because if all the great amateurs and professionals here at basenotes could show three or four of their formulations, i think it would open up a great source for a much easier learning curve for all of us.

    I started to 'open source' some of mine, they can be found on my blog.

    Have fun!
    Happy perfuming.

    Jeroen.

    Perfume formulation blog

  7. #7
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    105

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    Yeah that's true. OK I'm going to share my latest one, it's called Honey Amber (for now). It's still a bit of a WIP as is all art (I haven't included any aroma chemicals yet) but I'm happy with it. The longevity and projection are quite good, but not amazing. It's really dark and warm. Perfect for winter. Most of the time it smells of elegant wood / amber notes, but you can definitely smell the honey after a short time. All ingredients are tinctured in alcohol at the given percentage. The honey is a 50/50 tincture of white creamed clover honey and beeswax (takes at the very least a couple of weeks). I hope someone can try this and let me know your feedback! How can I improve it, in your opinion?

    ==========
    HONEY AMBER
    ==========

    Sample can be made in a test tube using drops. Proper formulation should be made using grams.

    Top
    ----
    4 All Spice @ 20%
    2 Mint @ 20%
    1 Bergamot @ 100%
    6 Lemongrass @ 1%
    8 Pink Pepper @ 10%

    Middle
    --------
    10 Cinnamon @ 20%
    2 Nutmeg @ 20%
    12 Honey @ 10%
    1 Geranium @ 10%

    Base
    ------
    4 "Oriental musk" fragrance oil @ 100% (this amount of musk does not really have a detectable scent)
    2 Labdanum Absolute @ 0.1%
    18 Benzoin @ 10%
    7 Rosewood @ 1.5%
    11 Vanilla pod @ 10%
    1 Patchouli @ 10%
    Trace oakmoss

  8. #8

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    *applause*
    Thanx for sharing!
    Hope others will follow our examples!

    I'll definitely give it a try, although i don't have some ingredients and have to substitute them. (All Spice, Honey and Oriental Musk). Let you know!

    Happy perfuming.

    Jeroen.

    My formulation blog

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    105

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    I'm sure you'll make do shouldn't affect it too much if you substitute those. The honey smell actually largely comes from the base notes, which seem to carry the honey a bit. It's taken me some playing around to figure that out.
    Last edited by Ambolt; 26th February 2013 at 09:14 AM.

  10. #10
    Basenotes Plus

    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    Thanks so much for your generosity, I appreciate it.
    This is what I am talking about. Just simple directions that will eventually lead to success!

  11. #11

    Default Re: Mad Scientist?

    Quote Originally Posted by pkiler View Post
    Numberz, Using the Perfumers search aforementioned, one can search for a material, say "Hedione". One would then find this link:
    http://www.thegoodscentscompany.com/data/rw1015272.html

    If you look closely for the GREEN BAR, then you will find theFlavor/Fragrance Formulas pertinent and containing that particular element. These formulas are a gift from heaven to learn from... and a very recent addition to The Good Scents Company's website database.

    You can also find formulas around the internet when googling different elements' names, in books found online, and in Patent documents.
    The Perfumers Search Page also has a Demonstration Formulas search which directly searches these Good Scents Company formulas as well as formulas from other sites.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 14th November 2013, 10:39 AM
  2. Mad scientist...
    By numberz in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26th February 2013, 12:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000