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  1. #1

    Default The eBay sellers do what they want

    Second time this year that I am receiving a different product than the one that was advertised.
    First I bought Zine Davidoff; advertised in the old packaging and I received a brand new product.
    Today I received Habit Rouge parfum. Ordered was the Limited Edition bottle covered with the red leather, I received a regular glass bottle. The price was US$ 129.- + shipping to europe + 35 euro import duty and tax.
    What a waste, I stop with these eBay sellers. I am sure some of you must have had the same experience.
    ----------------------------------------
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  2. #2

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    ow not nice specially for the high price... they should be extra careful...

    if i were you i would open a dispute on paypal and demand a refund....

  3. #3
    PerfumeCollector's Avatar
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    In your case you should take advantage of "ebay buyer protection". They will refund your money and shipping costs it you are unhappy with your purchase. Plus, they will punish the seller that falsely advertized.
    Perfume lovers of the world UNITE!!!!!

  4. #4

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Always verify if the picture is of actual item, whether box is sealed vs no/tester/plain box etc. before making purchase.
    Otherwise as stared above you can always dispute or return if returns are accepted.

  5. #5
    Basenotes Institution sjg3839's Avatar
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    This
    Quote Originally Posted by PerfumeCollector View Post
    In your case you should take advantage of "ebay buyer protection". They will refund your money and shipping costs it you are unhappy with your purchase. Plus, they will punish the seller that falsely advertized.
    Currently wearing: Memoir Man by Amouage

  6. #6

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    If the seller was located in Europe, I would have returned the bottle,
    but shipping it back to the US is just too complicated.
    I hate to open a dispute, but may be it's the only way they'll learn.



    Last edited by Georgio; 22nd February 2013 at 02:29 PM.
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    www.georgecramer.com

  7. #7

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    they will try to use the excuse for you to ship back... you will need to be straight with them... i think but paypal is quite good with the disputes so im sure they will be on your side in this one... you even had to pay for the customs for an item that you didnt order

  8. #8

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Perhaps if it's worth keeping your bottle, see if you can negotiate a partial refund instead of other alternatives?

  9. #9
    Lifelong Sniffaholic
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    In the course of any negotiations with the seller, be careful not to mention feedback. It makes sellers defensive and could be construed by the seller or eBay as "feedback extortion."



  10. #10

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Can you just not buy a leather jacket for your bottle? I agree it's cold but then if you switch the heating on, the bottle may not need it in the end.

    I guess leather jacket has been removed considering the summer seasons.

  11. #11

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Keeping the bottle is the only possibility.
    The seller responded already and regretted the mistake, a refund will be given,
    which is quite easy, since they have the regular bottle also on stock. So the price difference is clear.
    It's just too complicated to return and receiving another bottle, what the seller suggested,
    since the 35 euro import tax needs then to be paid again.
    Thanks for your responses gents!
    ----------------------------------------
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  12. #12
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Quote Originally Posted by bgoc View Post
    Can you just not buy a leather jacket for your bottle? I agree it's cold but then if you switch the heating on, the bottle may not need it in the end.

    I guess leather jacket has been removed considering the summer seasons.
    Is this supposed to be funny?

  13. #13

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    I see you got some satisfaction, which is great.

    You should have absolutely opened a dispute if the seller shipped you what was not ordered, and should not have accepted anything less than a full refund of every penny you are out.

    I use Ebay all the time, and everybody needs to realize something: if you use paypal, which is owned by Ebay, and you complain about not receiving what you ordered, assuming you're right, you will get every penny back. The rule on Ebay is seller beware, not buyer beware. And if you have to mail back an item, you can ask for, and will likely get, a full refund of that amount, too.

    We all keep hearing horror stories, but those either occurred before Ebay's current buyer-friendly policies went into place, or were reported by people that simply accepted their sad lot and did not contact Ebay/Paypal.

    I've now purchased over 500 items (!) on Ebay, including probably about thirty colognes. I have had to open about three or four disputes (none for cologne). In every single one, I received a full refund of all of my money.
    Current Top Five:

    1. Creed Green Irish Tweed
    2. Tom Ford Neroli Portofino
    3. Hermes Concentre d'Orange Verte
    4. Bond No. 9 New Haarlem
    5. Creed Original Vetiver

  14. #14

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    I think we should support economy and perfume houses and buy from the house itself or respectable (niche) perfume shops!

  15. #15

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    What is in the picture doesn't really matter, what matters is the description. I've seen listings on ebay for a 2.5oz bottle of Green Irish Tweed but the picture shows a 4oz bottle. If i order this, should I expect to receive a 4oz bottle even though the listing clearly states the auction is for a 2.5oz? Sellers should be more responsible and use photos of the exact item, but this is not always the case. Often times stock photos are used. Now if the description did state that it came in a leather casing, well that's another story.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Unfortunately this is one of the drawbacks of dealing with certain incompetent individuals selling their items on Ebay. I do believe though that honest mistakes do occur at times.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Quote Originally Posted by PerfumeCollector View Post
    In your case you should take advantage of "ebay buyer protection". They will refund your money and shipping costs it you are unhappy with your purchase. Plus, they will punish the seller that falsely advertized.
    plus +1
    Smelling Good on a Budget!

  18. #18
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Quote Originally Posted by Georgio View Post
    Second time this year that I am receiving a different product than the one that was advertised.
    First I bought Zine Davidoff; advertised in the old packaging and I received a brand new product.
    Today I received Habit Rouge parfum. Ordered was the Limited Edition bottle covered with the red leather, I received a regular glass bottle. The price was US$ 129.- + shipping to europe + 35 euro import duty and tax.
    What a waste, I stop with these eBay sellers. I am sure some of you must have had the same experience.
    This is Habit Rouge Eau de Parfum - there is also a parfum (Habit Rouge l'Extrait).

    By the way, the leather-clad bottle was not a limited edition. It was the standard presentation when the EdP was first released. It was later reformulated (and oud was no longer listed in the notes) and the presentation then changed to the plain glass bottle. So you didn't just get the same juice in a plain bottle - you got the new formulation.

    You didn't link to the listing, but I would repeat others' comments to read the description carefully to ensure you are getting what you think. If it doesn't say specifically that the item is "as pictured" or exactly describe the item then it may not be what you think. Stock photos are easy to spot, and are often completely wrong. A vintage box in a stock photo is almost always not what you will get.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - -

  19. #19
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    i am so careful now with bying perfumes over ebay---my first 2 purchases ever were complete fakes! i got refunded but lost almost 2 months on both...and lost postage ofcourse...

    now i buy only from people who sell perfumes only and have good track record (not necesarrily 100%), but i read others comments and thats how i decide and ask questions if something is not clear....and usually good sellers have many pictures....or they just work like niche shops...so you know if they understand the matter or not...sloppy they are not...

    and how did you end up paying custom? most of those good sellers dont state the full value!

  20. #20
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Quote Originally Posted by JiveHippo View Post
    What is in the picture doesn't really matter, what matters is the description. I've seen listings on ebay for a 2.5oz bottle of Green Irish Tweed but the picture shows a 4oz bottle. If i order this, should I expect to receive a 4oz bottle even though the listing clearly states the auction is for a 2.5oz? Sellers should be more responsible and use photos of the exact item, but this is not always the case. Often times stock photos are used. Now if the description did state that it came in a leather casing, well that's another story.
    What is in the picture is what the buyer should expect to get.

    Imagine an auction for a Ford Mustang with a picture of a Mustang, but in the details in small print it says Ford Focus. Is that legal?

    Fraud is no different with fragrances. Sellers can not show a picture of a vintage fragrance and sell a modern fragrance, but sellers do this. It is fraud. If the headline says Kouros and the picture is a bottle with a metal base, then that is older Kouros and not the new all white bottle Kouros. Sellers have to use accurate pictures. They can't send an all white bottle when the picture is a metal base with different juice inside. That is fraud. Sellers know it is fraud. The problem is nobody sues sellers. Everyone uses ebay for disputes.

    There are many solutions to this problem. You don't need to rely on ebay to fix what is fraud. A good lawyer in the USA will get back costs plus $1000 for each instance of fraud. If more buyers sued sellers there wouldn't be fraud.

    I emailed one seller back and forth several times trying to determine if they were selling modern or vintage. Every answer was deceptive and questions were never directly anwsered. If I asked "Does the bottle have a metal base like in the sellers photo?", the reply would be"It is 100% authentic and sealed in the box.". That doesn't anwser the question. The only fact to go on is the picture, and if the seller sends a different item, hire a lawyer and sue for damages, plus an additional $1000 for fraud, plus legal fees. Lawyers will also get the buisness and home address of the seller, and the lawyers can contact appropriate law enforcement that can send forensic accountants to determine where the seller obtained their products (to determine if it is vintage or not) and whom the seller sold to. If it's over a certain dollar amount, it becomes a felony.
    Vintage Kouros rocks

  21. #21

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    just raise the issue via paypal and ask for a refund + return shipping cost for false advertisement

    and the version you've got is the reformulation which is not as good as the version wrapped in red leather
    AUSSIES, join our exclusive niche split club.

    https://groups.google.com/forum/?fro...s-niche-splits

    Currently splitting:

    Amouage - Tribute, Homage and OPUS VII
    Andy Tauer - Noontide Petals, Miriam and Loretta
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    The Different Company - Oud Shamash, Oud for Love and Aurore Nomade
    Guerlain - Sous Le Vent, Anglique Noire, Bois d'Armenie, Cruel Gardenia, Rose Barbare

    and many more niches up for split...

  22. #22

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Quote Originally Posted by smellgood4u View Post
    What is in the picture is what the buyer should expect to get.

    Imagine an auction for a Ford Mustang with a picture of a Mustang, but in the details in small print it says Ford Focus. Is that legal?

    Fraud is no different with fragrances. Sellers can not show a picture of a vintage fragrance and sell a modern fragrance, but sellers do this. It is fraud. If the headline says Kouros and the picture is a bottle with a metal base, then that is older Kouros and not the new all white bottle Kouros. Sellers have to use accurate pictures. They can't send an all white bottle when the picture is a metal base with different juice inside. That is fraud. Sellers know it is fraud. The problem is nobody sues sellers. Everyone uses ebay for disputes.

    There are many solutions to this problem. You don't need to rely on ebay to fix what is fraud. A good lawyer in the USA will get back costs plus $1000 for each instance of fraud. If more buyers sued sellers there wouldn't be fraud.

    I emailed one seller back and forth several times trying to determine if they were selling modern or vintage. Every answer was deceptive and questions were never directly anwsered. If I asked "Does the bottle have a metal base like in the sellers photo?", the reply would be"It is 100% authentic and sealed in the box.". That doesn't anwser the question. The only fact to go on is the picture, and if the seller sends a different item, hire a lawyer and sue for damages, plus an additional $1000 for fraud, plus legal fees. Lawyers will also get the buisness and home address of the seller, and the lawyers can contact appropriate law enforcement that can send forensic accountants to determine where the seller obtained their products (to determine if it is vintage or not) and whom the seller sold to. If it's over a certain dollar amount, it becomes a felony.
    I think the simplest way is to use the paypal dispute resolution function, which seems to work really well.

    If you can find an attorney to handle the fraud aspect, that's great, but as information remember that (1) fraud laws vary widely from state to state, (2) filing a suit against a person in another state based on an Ebay sale is fraught with potential legal issues (from personal jurisdiction to venue to the measure of damages to the recovery potential), and (3) in my (very, very limited) experience, local authorities are often hesitant to get involved without very compelling facts. But sure, any potential means of recovery should be investigated, especially if for some reason Ebay/paypal doesn't give relief. I just would be pessimistic about devoting a lot of time and energy into a potential fraud suit. Unless I was REALLY pissed.

    On the other hand, I was once contacted by an Assistant United States Attorney halfway across the country who notified me that a piece of computer software I had purchased on Ebay was actually a stolen item, and the seller had been indicted as part of a huge interstate theft case. The AUSA offered to include me in the case as a potential victim entitled to restitution. I declined, because the software had worked and I didn't need to return it as evidence. But it was nice to see the feds policing that sort of thing.
    Current Top Five:

    1. Creed Green Irish Tweed
    2. Tom Ford Neroli Portofino
    3. Hermes Concentre d'Orange Verte
    4. Bond No. 9 New Haarlem
    5. Creed Original Vetiver

  23. #23
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Quote Originally Posted by barclaydetolly View Post
    I think the simplest way is to use the paypal dispute resolution function, which seems to work really well.

    If you can find an attorney to handle the fraud aspect, that's great, but as information remember that (1) fraud laws vary widely from state to state, (2) filing a suit against a person in another state based on an Ebay sale is fraught with potential legal issues (from personal jurisdiction to venue to the measure of damages to the recovery potential), and (3) in my (very, very limited) experience, local authorities are often hesitant to get involved without very compelling facts. But sure, any potential means of recovery should be investigated, especially if for some reason Ebay/paypal doesn't give relief. I just would be pessimistic about devoting a lot of time and energy into a potential fraud suit. Unless I was REALLY pissed.

    On the other hand, I was once contacted by an Assistant United States Attorney halfway across the country who notified me that a piece of computer software I had purchased on Ebay was actually a stolen item, and the seller had been indicted as part of a huge interstate theft case. The AUSA offered to include me in the case as a potential victim entitled to restitution. I declined, because the software had worked and I didn't need to return it as evidence. But it was nice to see the feds policing that sort of thing.
    All 50 states have adopted the Uniform Commercial Code which governs sales and frauds. The law is the same from state to state.

    I would sue in my state, the buyers state, and force the seller to represent himself in my state. The seller can pay the cost of traveling to my state and staying in a hotel in my state. If the seller doesn't come to my state, there is a good chance that without a defense the courts would rule against the seller. The next step would be to take that judgement and enforce it in the sellers state.

    Criminal prosecution is a different matter. Having a conviction in state civil court often will give the police reason enough to investigate the fraud as a crime. Locals may not have the means to investigate, so complaining to the attorney general of the state often helps. The AG will have the resources to send an accountant along with search warrents to determine how much fraud has occured.

    The mistake buyers make is thinking nobody in law enforcement will care over a $80 sale. What buyers fail to realize is these sellers may have sold 1000 times over the same fraud. To the state, it will not be an $80 fraud, it will be a $80,000 fraud that was comitted 1000 times.
    Vintage Kouros rocks

  24. #24

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Quote Originally Posted by smellgood4u View Post
    All 50 states have adopted the Uniform Commercial Code which governs sales and frauds. The law is the same from state to state.

    I would sue in my state, the buyers state, and force the seller to represent himself in my state. The seller can pay the cost of traveling to my state and staying in a hotel in my state. If the seller doesn't come to my state, there is a good chance that without a defense the courts would rule against the seller. The next step would be to take that judgement and enforce it in the sellers state.

    Criminal prosecution is a different matter. Having a conviction in state civil court often will give the police reason enough to investigate the fraud as a crime. Locals may not have the means to investigate, so complaining to the attorney general of the state often helps. The AG will have the resources to send an accountant along with search warrents to determine how much fraud has occured.

    The mistake buyers make is thinking nobody in law enforcement will care over a $80 sale. What buyers fail to realize is these sellers may have sold 1000 times over the same fraud. To the state, it will not be an $80 fraud, it will be a $80,000 fraud that was comitted 1000 times.
    You obviously have thought this out, and I commend you for that. As you probably know, however, the UCC, despite the name, isn't perfectly uniform -- my state, for example, has not adopted several of its provisions, and the fraud provisions are governed in my neck of the woods by our Civil Code. But that's just a quibble -- my point was just that I personally would rather get my money back than invest a bunch of time and energy on a course of action that may not get me much in the end. You obviously feel different, which is great.

    I have tried on several occasions to get law enforcement interested on behalf of my clients, and have not gotten very far. The first question I'm usually asked is whether my clients got their money back, and when I say yes (because Ebay almost always refunds the money), the interest level pretty much vanishes.
    Current Top Five:

    1. Creed Green Irish Tweed
    2. Tom Ford Neroli Portofino
    3. Hermes Concentre d'Orange Verte
    4. Bond No. 9 New Haarlem
    5. Creed Original Vetiver

  25. #25

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    ebay is absolutely horrible when it comes to protecting customers or even their own sellers. They have a fleet of lawyers, but their lawyers are only there to protect ebay, not to protect ebay customers or sellers.

    I was sold what turned out to be an OBVIOUS fake. I documented it and sent that to ebay. They decided I could have my money back if I returned the fake to the seller, meaning the seller could sell it again. In fact, there was physical evidence on the fake that showed it had probably already been sold and returned multiple times. I sent ebay the evidence. They didn't care. There was NO WAY I was going to return the fake to the seller. That would be me taking part in screwing over someone else (because the seller would sell it again). No way.

    The seller admitted the item was a fake in ebay correspondence. I forwarded those messages to ebay. ebay didn't care.

    The seller offered me free merchandise in exchange for a 5 star review. That's against ebay rules. I forwarded those messages to ebay. ebay didn't care.

    When sending me the fake, the seller included a business card with an ebay ID that didn't match the ID I bought from. I looked into it and, of course, it was a banned ID. ebay was able to find the seller had at LEAST 4 banned IDs, but they didn't do anything about it and they let the seller keep on selling.

    ebay does not care.

    I was so fed up with the idea of returning the fake to the seller to get my money back that I took it to the police instead. I live in a city that has an internet crimes department (which may just be 1 or 2 officers, but it's awesome to have it!). The officer confiscated the fake and gave me documentation, which I then gave to ebay to finally get my frigging refund. But did ebay do anything about the seller? NOPE. They let the seller keep on selling.

    ebay does not care.

    There are so many wonderful sellers on ebay. It's such a shame ebay treats them so poorly by allowing fraudulent sellers to sell there too. If there were a better, safer, alternative to ebay, ebay would make safety a priority. But there isn't, so they don't. They don't because, as far as they're concerned, profits from fraudulent sellers are just as good as profits from honest sellers. It's all about dollars to them. The bottle I was sold didn't even have watered down perfume in it. It had what smelled like chlorine.

    Even with police documentation, plus documentation from Dior showing the item was a fake, and even though the seller admitted she sold me a fake and already had multiple banned ebay IDs (!!!), ebay let the seller keep on selling. ebay doesn't care.

    In my opinion, the only thing that works is finding a police department with an internet crimes department and let them handle it. They'll actually be glad you did. I was sold fake Fahrenheit. The officer I spoke with already had a contact with Dior. He told me a few stories about some of the fakes he'd already seen. Go to the police. Have the item "confiscated" (which basically means swapping it for a police receipt). Fax ebay the police receipt form and they'll issue the refund. Beyond that, I doubt there's anything that can be done. ebay simply does not care.

    I'd love it if honest sellers ganged up on ebay with some sort of lawsuit in order to force ebay to permanently ban fraudulent sellers. Like I said, when I gave ebay the police receipt showing the item was a fake and had been confiscated, I also asked that they look up the seller's multiple IDs and write that down on the case I had open. They did. The seller had multiple banned IDs. ebay issued me the refund (after months of hassle!) but they let the seller keep on selling. That's Effing Crazy.

    ebay does not care.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by smellgood4u View Post
    The mistake buyers make is thinking nobody in law enforcement will care over a $80 sale. What buyers fail to realize is these sellers may have sold 1000 times over the same fraud. To the state, it will not be an $80 fraud, it will be a $80,000 fraud that was comitted 1000 times.
    THIS!!!!

    The other mistake buyers make is believing they have to send the fake back to the seller to get a refund. THEY DON'T. If you send the item back, you become part of the cycle that ends up screwing over the next person to receive the fake. Take it to the police. Have it confiscated. Send the police receipt to ebay. Even that won't get the seller banned (because ebay really IS that corrupt), but it'll get you your money back without giving the seller the chance to sell it again, and it'll at least put a black mark in the seller's file with ebay that may someday force ebay to eventually someday maybe ban them (but seriously, ebay doesn't care).

    I should also add: I've lad some very good purchases on ebay. I still use ebay, though I'm more careful now. I'm just shocked by how little protection there is for customers there. They talk about customer protection, but that's just marketing. ebay doesn't protect customers by having them return fake goods to the seller so the seller can sell them again. Could you imagine if brick and mortar stores did a recall only to then put the recalled goods back on the shelves? ebay's business practices are really horrible.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Quote Originally Posted by barclaydetolly View Post
    I think the simplest way is to use the paypal dispute resolution function, which seems to work really well.
    That's what I did and it didn't work for me at all. ebay and paypal are co-owned, but the lawyers do a good job of keeping them separate entities to protect each from the fraud committed on and by the other. It was only after going through round after round with ebay and then with paypal that I finally gave up and went to the police. In an instant, months of fighting with ebay and paypal suddenly ended and I got a refund so fast your head would spin. Not because ebay and papal gave a damn. They just wanted to protect themselves and wash their hands of it. I fought with ebay and paypal for months. After going to the police, documentation of my 100% refund was almost immediate.
    Last edited by L'Homme Blanc Individuel; 23rd February 2013 at 02:52 AM.
    "Follow your nose. It always knows." -- Toucan Sam

  26. #26

    Default

    I recently had a horrible experience with LilyDirect on ebay. I found out the have a website too.

    I strongly advise everyone to avoid these people.

    I bought a Creed Royal Water 2.5 oz bottle to hold me off until my friend gets me the real deal.

    The advertisement said it was 100% authentic tester with cap.

    I paid, and 5 days went by. No tracking # nothing. Finally I message them asking what is going on, and the next day they respond. " We are out of this fragrance with cap. We only have one bottle left, without cap. We waiting for you to advice."

    Why the HELL would you be waiting for me to tell you something when I had no clue what was going on?

    I told them to ship the one without the cap.

    I receive it, and immediately I knew something was up. The box had no
    Creed sticker on the bottom at all. I pull the bottle out, and the juice is apple juice yellow! No lot # stamped or etched on the bottle at all.

    I had never experienced anything like this, I've never got a Creed from anywhere but Neimans.

    I posted a thread here to get opinions, and everyone said basically the juice was OLD as hell. Upon further investigation, I find out that since it had no batch #, that meant it was very old as well.

    So I messaged them. No response for days. Finally they responded, saying "sorry for your old fragrance. Here is our address".

    I'm thinking, the hell if I'm paying for shipping.
    So I opened a case. I got a prepaid shipping label, sent it back. I got a refund 1 week after they received it.

    I was so mad. Never again!

  27. #27

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Quote Originally Posted by L'Homme Blanc Individuel View Post
    ebay is absolutely horrible when it comes to protecting customers or even their own sellers. They have a fleet of lawyers, but their lawyers are only there to protect ebay, not to protect ebay customers or sellers.

    I was sold what turned out to be an OBVIOUS fake. I documented it and sent that to ebay. They decided I could have my money back if I returned the fake to the seller, meaning the seller could sell it again. In fact, there was physical evidence on the fake that showed it had probably already been sold and returned multiple times. I sent ebay the evidence. They didn't care. There was NO WAY I was going to return the fake to the seller. That would be me taking part in screwing over someone else (because the seller would sell it again). No way.

    The seller admitted the item was a fake in ebay correspondence. I forwarded those messages to ebay. ebay didn't care.

    The seller offered me free merchandise in exchange for a 5 star review. That's against ebay rules. I forwarded those messages to ebay. ebay didn't care.

    When sending me the fake, the seller included a business card with an ebay ID that didn't match the ID I bought from. I looked into it and, of course, it was a banned ID. ebay was able to find the seller had at LEAST 4 banned IDs, but they didn't do anything about it and they let the seller keep on selling.

    ebay does not care.

    I was so fed up with the idea of returning the fake to the seller to get my money back that I took it to the police instead. I live in a city that has an internet crimes department (which may just be 1 or 2 officers, but it's awesome to have it!). The officer confiscated the fake and gave me documentation, which I then gave to ebay to finally get my frigging refund. But did ebay do anything about the seller? NOPE. They let the seller keep on selling.

    ebay does not care.

    There are so many wonderful sellers on ebay. It's such a shame ebay treats them so poorly by allowing fraudulent sellers to sell there too. If there were a better, safer, alternative to ebay, ebay would make safety a priority. But there isn't, so they don't. They don't because, as far as they're concerned, profits from fraudulent sellers are just as good as profits from honest sellers. It's all about dollars to them. The bottle I was sold didn't even have watered down perfume in it. It had what smelled like chlorine.

    Even with police documentation, plus documentation from Dior showing the item was a fake, and even though the seller admitted she sold me a fake and already had multiple banned ebay IDs (!!!), ebay let the seller keep on selling. ebay doesn't care.

    In my opinion, the only thing that works is finding a police department with an internet crimes department and let them handle it. They'll actually be glad you did. I was sold fake Fahrenheit. The officer I spoke with already had a contact with Dior. He told me a few stories about some of the fakes he'd already seen. Go to the police. Have the item "confiscated" (which basically means swapping it for a police receipt). Fax ebay the police receipt form and they'll issue the refund. Beyond that, I doubt there's anything that can be done. ebay simply does not care.

    I'd love it if honest sellers ganged up on ebay with some sort of lawsuit in order to force ebay to permanently ban fraudulent sellers. Like I said, when I gave ebay the police receipt showing the item was a fake and had been confiscated, I also asked that they look up the seller's multiple IDs and write that down on the case I had open. They did. The seller had multiple banned IDs. ebay issued me the refund (after months of hassle!) but they let the seller keep on selling. That's Effing Crazy.

    ebay does not care.

    - - - Updated - - -



    THIS!!!!

    The other mistake buyers make is believing they have to send the fake back to the seller to get a refund. THEY DON'T. If you send the item back, you become part of the cycle that ends up screwing over the next person to receive the fake. Take it to the police. Have it confiscated. Send the police receipt to ebay. Even that won't get the seller banned (because ebay really IS that corrupt), but it'll get you your money back without giving the seller the chance to sell it again, and it'll at least put a black mark in the seller's file with ebay that may someday force ebay to eventually someday maybe ban them (but seriously, ebay doesn't care).

    I should also add: I've lad some very good purchases on ebay. I still use ebay, though I'm more careful now. I'm just shocked by how little protection there is for customers there. They talk about customer protection, but that's just marketing. ebay doesn't protect customers by having them return fake goods to the seller so the seller can sell them again. Could you imagine if brick and mortar stores did a recall only to then put the recalled goods back on the shelves? ebay's business practices are really horrible.

    - - - Updated - - -



    That's what I did and it didn't work for me at all. ebay and paypal are co-owned, but the lawyers do a good job of keeping them separate entities to protect each from the fraud committed on and by the other. It was only after going through round after round with ebay and then with paypal that I finally gave up and went to the police. In an instant, months of fighting with ebay and paypal suddenly ended and I got a refund so fast your head would spin. Not because ebay and papal gave a damn. They just wanted to protect themselves and wash their hands of it. I fought with ebay and paypal for months. After going to the police, documentation of my 100% refund was almost immediate.
    I'm sorry to hear about your experience. Like all companies, Ebay cares only about its bottom line. Its stated policy is now to favor buyers over sellers, and that seems to work. Personally, I've always had good success with Ebay's dispute resolution, and not once have I had to contact my local police.

    I should also add that, with well over 500 purchases, I've had to use dispute resolution less than five times. Actually, now that I think of it, since I canceled an old ebay account with another 400 purchases and no disputes at all, we're actually talking about 900 purchases with less than five problems. That compares pretty favorably even to my local brick and mortar stores.

    Ebay isn't perfect, and I never believed it cared for anything other than its bottom line. All I can say is that my personal experience has been uniformly positive. Yours has not.

    But hey, personally, I can't stand Tiffany and will never order from it again after the worst customer service experience I have every had. Others swear by it. Customer service is generally not that great in this country.

    By the way, I'm not an Ebay apologist. I've complained about it in several threads, and had a bad experience selling some cologne once when I clearly stated I would only ship to a US address in a listing, and a guy in the Ukraine won and demanded I ship to him, and Ebay backed him up because I had not also included a code in my listing that automatically blocked non-US members from bidding.

    It's not like I get a commission for Ebay. I'm just reporting my experiences.
    Last edited by barclaydetolly; 23rd February 2013 at 04:19 AM.
    Current Top Five:

    1. Creed Green Irish Tweed
    2. Tom Ford Neroli Portofino
    3. Hermes Concentre d'Orange Verte
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    5. Creed Original Vetiver

  28. #28
    Paul Kiler
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    I recently bought the Globe fragrance in the limited Edition metal packaging. What came was the normal glass bottle. I hate the fragrance and was only buying the bottle. I sent it back, and got a refund.
    Paul Kiler
    PK Perfumes
    http://www.PKPERFUMES.com
    Gold Medal for "Best Aroma"; Los Angeles Artisan Fragrance Salon

  29. #29

    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    I am accepting a 35% discount on the order, but to get that, I first have to give positive feedback.
    These sellers are always on the winning side.
    It's the only way to go since I paid already the import duty and transport. No way to get that back.
    I find this such a unpleasant experience that I do give up on buying vintage from eBay sellers,
    I am sure that if I was located in the same country as the seller, instead of the other side of the world,
    I would have gotten the right product.
    ----------------------------------------
    www.georgecramer.com

  30. #30
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    Default Re: The eBay sellers do what they want

    Quote Originally Posted by Georgio View Post
    I am accepting a 35% discount on the order, but to get that, I first have to give positive feedback.
    These sellers are always on the winning side.
    It's the only way to go since I paid already the import duty and transport. No way to get that back.
    I find this such a unpleasant experience that I do give up on buying vintage from eBay sellers,
    I am sure that if I was located in the same country as the seller, instead of the other side of the world,
    I would have gotten the right product.
    Is it against the rules to ask for positive feedback in exchange for a discounted price?

    That would be a red flag that the seller is not honest. They want the positive feedback to protect themselves.

    I would have saved that request for positive feedback by using a screen capture.
    Vintage Kouros rocks

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