Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1

    Default Oud: the beginning.

    When did Oud appear on western markets?
    It's an easy answer: M7 by Yves Saint Laurent in 2002.
    Wrong answer.
    It was Pierre Montale in 2001 with his "Aouds", right?
    Wrong, too.
    Because Micallef said she used Oud since 1997.

    Right? yes...until now.

    Because it seems there was someone who used Oud even earlier and few people knew it.
    That perfume *maybe* contained real Oud, and you can buy it for pennies in dusty, abandoned stores.
    True or false? judge yourself. (thanks to Bryan Ross, "FromPyrgos")

    OUD: the real beginning?
    http://raidersofthelostscent.blogspo...ng-of-oud.html

  2. #2

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    I acquired a partial bottle of it when I purchased a lot, but I only did a dab sampling. I'll have to dig it out one of these days and see if I can detect something that seems like oud. Thanks.
    Last edited by Bigsly; 2nd December 2013 at 06:49 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigsly View Post
    I acquired a partial bottle of it when I purchased a lot, but I only did a dab sample. I'll have to dig it out one of these days and see if I can detect something that seems like oud. Thanks.
    from "Fragrantica" :
    "it starts smelling funeral, just smelling cemetery.
    The prettiness of this thumbnail does not match the strangeness content.
    Strong, strange, sweet, melancholy, mournful as a agonizing torment."

    well, it is promising :-)

  4. #4

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    I don't know, that's a pretty obscure house. I have no doubts perfumers dabbled with the note for some time, but I would probably consider 10 Corso Como as being the first real mainstream scent to incorporate the note back in 1999.
    The Bark Bites Back.

  5. #5
    hednic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    McLean, NYC, & Búzios
    Posts
    79,411

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    I would have thought also sometime in the nineties but I would have not have had a clue from what house this would be coming from.
    (1052)
    Remember that while it is perfectly acceptable to criticize the content of a post - criticizing the poster is not.
    Mean spirited, nasty, snide, sarcastic, hateful, and rude individuals don't warrant or deserve other individuals' acknowledgement or respect.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    IMHO It don't matter to an extent where it got its training wheels in the perfume realm, but understand that it is important to give credit were credit is due ... Hence, what's important to me is which perfume house or indie house is blending it To a gorgeous enticing level...with all due respects I say this Monsieur Moreau
    "Thank GOD for the nose, for without it we would not be enjoying these beautiful created Scents" also Remember "Balance is everything and the key to appreciating "

  7. #7
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    15,256
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    Whoever made it first is anyone's wild guess but YSL made it popular in North America

  8. #8
    Dependent Arij's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Montréal
    Posts
    1,137

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    Always covering great subjects Andrč! Your blog is a must read affair. Keep up the good work.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    I think the question should be: when popular perfume houses started to use Oud in their formulas?

    Because I belive Oud itself should have been in the west for more than half a century given the high number of

    immigrants from the East have been in Europe for very long time and they definitely have oud.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    If we are speaking about popular perfumes, then the answer is clear: YSL M7, despite its huge failure, was the first "mainstream" perfume to use Oud.
    The iinteresting question, at least for me, is : when , in the Western perfumery, Oud was used for the first time?

  11. #11

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    I suspect the timing of the "oud" explosion in the West could be linked to appearance of Firmenich 010760E and Givaudan Black Agar synthetics. This is a perfect new marketing idea - spin the mystique and exclusivity theme while using cheap yet distinctly new and exotic (the the western consumer's nose) note. Before these ingredients were available the oud note was obviously of no interest to perfume houses - the real stuff is way too expensive and must be blended from many small batches to achieve scent profile uniformity. Even when blended using lower grade oud oil it's still very difficult to keep the costs down and it will never smell the same from batch to batch.

    As for its longevity - pure oud oil can oxidize if exposed to air but that doesn't make it smell bad or rancid like olive oil for example, it simply looses the top notes and some of the more distinct regional profile character that oils from different regions have, the different oils start smelling alike in a way and closer to the typical woody oud drydown one can experience with an un-oxydized oil after the unique top and mid notes burn off. If not exposed to air, oud oils only improve with age gaining a depth and smoothness, revealing more complex facets and loosing some of the sharp edges. Vintage sandalwood oil goes through a similar transformation - stuff from 40-50 years ago smells deep, complex and distinguished compared to the sharper, higher pitched and shallower oils of today.

    But when real oud is blended with other chemical agents and aromachemicals in a spray fragrance, who knows? I wouldn't be surprised if they can "turn" in a fragrance having reacted with other ingredients.

    Either way, who cares when the oud craze started in the West - the western perfume houses have been producing overpriced and overhyped products that smell similar to each other and lack the breath of life the real stuff has in abundance. I wouldn't doubt that they use insignificant amounts of real oud oils in their creations if only to be able to legally pitch their wares as "oud". Even that has harmed whatever little wild oud trees there still were as most are now gone with only small pockets remaining in inaccessible areas. There's just not enough of the stuff to go around with the heightened demand for both oil in the West and wood for incense and carving in the East. I hope the craze passes soon and maybe there's a chance that the next generations will still experience the real stuff from the wild in the decades to come.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    Tom Ford initiated the trend but it gained momentum by 2007-2010, with the advent of Montales. I think Montale really helped creating the Oud craze, which has abated a bit now. If you go back to Basenotes between late 2009- 2011, it was all oud , oud and oud, in particular Montale Black Aoud.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Oud: the beginning.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arij View Post
    Always covering great subjects Andrč! Your blog is a must read affair. Keep up the good work.
    +1 - always great to read thru your blog Andre

Similar Threads

  1. The beginning of the end of perfumers?
    By Snafoo in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 7th December 2007, 03:35 PM
  2. Beginning to really dislike GiT
    By incedal in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 29th July 2005, 12:11 AM
  3. The beginning of my obsession....
    By rjrober22 in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 29th January 2005, 02:42 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •