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  1. #1

    Default Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway


  2. #2

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    I am loving this website more and more. I heard horrible stories about sandalwood and how it harvest and sol so I am glad to read the following

    "After blending and pouring into large drums or small flacons a Certificate of Analysis is logged to the batch number. This means that the final analysis of the oil is traceable back to each plantation. A legal, traceable and transparent supply chain from soil to oil."

    Happy holidays all

  3. #3
    Basenotes Member paimutan's Avatar
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    This was an excellent crash course in understanding sandalwood production. I was particularly awestruck reading that even the stumps are ripped from the ground, for their yield of oil!

  4. #4

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    I've been following the bits and pieces of information about Australian Santalum album, so your series was timely and topical. Such a wealth of information you have provided.

    I heard that Santalum album may have been indiginous to the Australian continent and that these plantations in the tropical north are a sort of home coming for the species. I love the native Australian spicatum and have an assortment of Mysore sandalwoods including several antique examples I've collected as well as tiny samples from the late 90's before the crisis. I would love to see how this recent extraction compares. I'm sure aging will help the oil mellow.

    I really enjoyed learning about the process of extraction. The low yield, 3.7% is not surprising and will probably increase as the trees mature into their 3rd decade. I also appreciate the effort Tropical Forestry Services is making to eliminate waste in all aspects of production and offer a product that is traceable to the plantation, from soil to oil. That is setting a new standard for world production of key perfumery ingredients.

    Thank you for this great series!

  5. #5

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    I was surprised to learn that the trees are ready to begin harvesting. I thought it would take more years of growth. Thanks for the draw.

  6. #6

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    Interesting that different batches of oils are blended together for a more consistent odour profile. I thought they'd just blend everything together. Does this mean that some amount of oil is left behind?

    Also, I wonder if any of the Australian Santalum Album trees will be allowed to reach their full maturity before being harvested? Maybe this way they could offer a superior grade of oil in addition to the regular one (assuming an older tree would give a superior oil - maybe not?).

  7. #7

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    I was very interested to learn that the spot price of Australian album was higher than it's Mysore counterpart, but I would suppose that it being a new crop the demand would ultimately be much higher. compared though to the options I find it surprising that Album still commands such high prices especially with austrocaledonicum having more of the sandal woody constituents such as a-santalol which is what gives the it, it's creamyness.

  8. #8

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    I'm really surprised by the cost of Sandalwood and that, "Over the past 15 years the price has increased on a compound basis by 16 % per annum."

    I would like to see more efforts at sustainability and even highlighting a few locations that are getting it right like this:
    http://www.thesummitvanuatu.com/sour...d-oil-vanuatu/

  9. #9

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    Hi Jordan,
    I learned so many things from this series. I would say that I was most surprised by the fact that nothing is wasted in production. Also, that Italian stump and root pulling machine was something I've never seen before!
    Azar

  10. #10

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    Quote Originally Posted by davidcontact View Post
    I am loving this website more and more. I heard horrible stories about sandalwood and how it harvest and sol so I am glad to read the following

    "After blending and pouring into large drums or small flacons a Certificate of Analysis is logged to the batch number. This means that the final analysis of the oil is traceable back to each plantation. A legal, traceable and transparent supply chain from soil to oil."

    Happy holidays all
    Happy Holidays to you too David. I like the traceable chain. You are in the draw.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    Quote Originally Posted by paimutan View Post
    This was an excellent crash course in understanding sandalwood production. I was particularly awestruck reading that even the stumps are ripped from the ground, for their yield of oil!
    It was a crash course for me too. Fascinating to research. We were awestruck by the same things. Into the hat goes your good name Paimutan.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    Quote Originally Posted by mahboub View Post
    I've been following the bits and pieces of information about Australian Santalum album, so your series was timely and topical. Such a wealth of information you have provided.

    I heard that Santalum album may have been indiginous to the Australian continent and that these plantations in the tropical north are a sort of home coming for the species. I love the native Australian spicatum and have an assortment of Mysore sandalwoods including several antique examples I've collected as well as tiny samples from the late 90's before the crisis. I would love to see how this recent extraction compares. I'm sure aging will help the oil mellow.

    I really enjoyed learning about the process of extraction. The low yield, 3.7% is not surprising and will probably increase as the trees mature into their 3rd decade. I also appreciate the effort Tropical Forestry Services is making to eliminate waste in all aspects of production and offer a product that is traceable to the plantation, from soil to oil. That is setting a new standard for world production of key perfumery ingredients.

    Thank you for this great series!
    And thank you for reading Mahboub. Yes it is all about the aging after getting this far. How about a photo of your vintage oils? I like different ones on each wrist to enjoy the nuances. You are in with a grin for the draw.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    Quote Originally Posted by woodgirl View Post
    I was surprised to learn that the trees are ready to begin harvesting. I thought it would take more years of growth. Thanks for the draw.
    Ah, yes Woodgirl. As this is a commercial operation the date of harvesting is maximized for yield. It is likely though that some trees will be left to mature to see what the oil yield difference is - don't quote me on that though as it is an assumption. All the best to you for the draw that you are now in.

  14. #14

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    I highly doubted that the genetics of Santalum Album would prove sufficient to yield the 'Mysore' aromatic profile from Australian soil, water, light...

    Thanks to the Australians for proving me wrong.

    And thanks to Jordan and TFS for the draw!
    Last edited by grabuge; 18th December 2013 at 06:24 PM.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade View Post
    Interesting that different batches of oils are blended together for a more consistent odour profile. I thought they'd just blend everything together. Does this mean that some amount of oil is left behind?

    Also, I wonder if any of the Australian Santalum Album trees will be allowed to reach their full maturity before being harvested? Maybe this way they could offer a superior grade of oil in addition to the regular one (assuming an older tree would give a superior oil - maybe not?).
    Hmm, I do not have the facts on that. Maybe there is low-grade oil with less alpha and beta sanatol that is not commercially available. There are other elements as well as those two that perfumers look for to achieve various results.

    As for harvesting; a good question which I have commented on in the comment before your one. Furthermore, In Part 4 it does say that a 50-year old tree would only yield slightly more than 3 to 3.7% oil but presumably this would also effect the oil quality. Still I think these very organised people would have optimized the quality to age of tree when they made the date-of-harvest decision. O, and you are so in the draw Renegade!

  16. #16

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    Quote Originally Posted by kantofox View Post
    I was very interested to learn that the spot price of Australian album was higher than it's Mysore counterpart, but I would suppose that it being a new crop the demand would ultimately be much higher. compared though to the options I find it surprising that Album still commands such high prices especially with austrocaledonicum having more of the sandal woody constituents such as a-santalol which is what gives the it, it's creamyness.
    Ah, Kantofox, I think that is because this oil is actually available while the Mysore is not available at all except for vintage vats held by perfumers. I know what you mean though with Supply and Demand Economics.

    Santalum austrocaledonicum is more woody than Mysore but yes it still has the sought-after creaminess and is much much smoother than Santalum spicatum which is the native Australian variety. However as the S austocaledonicum does have have vast plantations on the level of this new enterprise I would imagine that has an effect on price or maybe the demand from perfumers varies. You can let us know if you win the draw that you are now in.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    Quote Originally Posted by Azar View Post
    Hi Jordan,
    I learned so many things from this series. I would say that I was most surprised by the fact that nothing is wasted in production. Also, that Italian stump and root pulling machine was something I've never seen before!
    Azar
    Much nicer than an oil-rig drill! I often wonder what happens to the vacuum left under the earth or sea by the extraction of petroleum oil. Whoops, off topic. Your Persian name is flying into the draw. Thank you for reading Azar.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    Quote Originally Posted by grabuge View Post
    I highly doubted that the genetics of Santalum Album would prove sufficient to yield the 'Mysore' aromatic profile from Australian soil, water, light...

    Thanks to the Australians for proving me wrong.

    And thanks to Jordan and TFS for the draw!
    Well Grabuge you are not the only one who had doubts on this experiment which has now become a major commercial operation. There must be thousands of Indian people who are even more surprised at the success of the oil profile. Hopefully they are glad too that this oil is now sustainable and available. It is all about the chronograph analysis and then your own nose. Or maybe the other way around! You can let us know your reaction if you win the draw. This oil is young and it is an ingredient not a perfume so as long as that all makes sense I hope you have a chance to make your own mind up.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    Quote Originally Posted by ryanvars View Post
    I'm really surprised by the cost of Sandalwood and that, "Over the past 15 years the price has increased on a compound basis by 16 % per annum."

    I would like to see more efforts at sustainability and even highlighting a few locations that are getting it right like this:
    http://www.thesummitvanuatu.com/sour...d-oil-vanuatu/
    Peace Ryanvars. Thank you for adding to the conversation with the link which I am off to read now. But first let's put you in the draw.

  20. #20
    DuNezDeBuzier's Avatar
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    Thank you for this very interesting series on Australian santalum album Mr. Jordan.

    Reading my way through, I could not help but notice the similarities between the plight of Sandalwood - Santalum album out of the mysore area of India and Agarwood/Oud - Aquilaria malaccensis out of India and southeast Asia.

    Would you know (and be able to share) whether TFS has entertained the cultivation/inoculation of agarwood/oud for commercial harvesting in anyway similar to its efforts with Santalum Album in Australia?

  21. #21
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    This is great and very educative series of articles. There are many interesting facts I've learned. The most important part for me is the one about the smell, part 7. I'm very happy to read positive opinions of those who have a huge experience with perfumes (Clayton, Portia, Suzanne). As the situation with Mysore sandalwood in India is rather bad, it sounds optimistic to have such a great alternative enriched with the virtues of Australian ground ("...a note of the Australian bush in it – but just a hint"-Suzanne R Banks, "...a fresh version of the Mysore, still rich and lavish but different."- Portia.) It would be interesting to make the same perfume with Mysore and Santalum Album just to see the particular differences. I think that there are perfumers who have already done this experiment in their laboratories. All in all, it seems encouraging.

  22. #22
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    Reading this series of installments about TFS's success in reestablishing santalum album as a sustainable species is truly a dream come true! "One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind!" Thank you for sharing this wonderful news, and a chance to sample the results!

  23. #23

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    I have learnt, rather superficially, that Australian album sandalwood smells similar to Mysore sandalwood, only stronger, although I'd have to smell it for myself to decide! Great series, Jordan :)

  24. #24
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    I've been fiddling around with the replacement arochemicals (ebanol, javanol, santaliff, sandella) for ages trying to find something I like. I'm excited to get a sniff of this new supply!!! I'm thrilled to hear the santalol levels are so high!

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    A very interesting set of articles ! I imagine that TFS is anxious to get on with their harvest, as 14 years is a long time to wait. In time, perhaps they will be growing even older trees ?

    I was particularly impressed by their greenhouses, and the number of seedlings they are producing every year !

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    I learned that the traditional method of sandalwood oil production is burying the cut logs in the ground so that white ants eat the outside wood leaving the oil carrying heartwood uneaten. I also learned that the fragrance of sandalwood is a natural repellant to those ants. I would have thought the yield from the sandalwood would be much higher than 3.7%. This was a great series Jordan, thanks for doing it and thanks for the draw!

  27. #27

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    Really interesting. I have always liked Sandalwood and sought it out in fragrances, but never realized how/where it came from. The idea that the stumps are ripped out to obtain the oil was eye opening to say the least. :)

  28. #28

    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    I found it interesting that Santalum album requires 3 different trees in order to grow.
    I also like how transparent TFS is being with the whole process, from picking through distillation, even being so careful about each batch. It's so nice that there is finally a completely legal source for the oil from this species. Hopefully it will decrease demand for its Indian counterpart and help curb the poaching of an already depleted terroir.
    I am interested to know how this compares with the native spicatum in its profile and how it blends.

  29. #29

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    Default Re: Article: Sandalwood Dreams, Part 8: Uses and Markets + Sandalwood Oil Giveaway

    I had used the original sandalwood prayer beads from India and can"t wait to smell this"new genre" of sandalwood .
    A very enlightening and informative series

  30. #30

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    As a sandalwood lover, it's great to read that the Australian santalum album is now being planted and harvested sustainably and that it can rival the Mysore sandalwood in terms of fragrance profile.
    These have been very informative articles. Thank you for sharing.

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