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  1. #1

    Default How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Happy new year to all professional and amateur perfumers around!

    My new "problem" (lol) has to do with the blending/curing/maturing process of my "wannabe" fragrances.
    I have noticed that almost all of them need at least 3 or even 4 months in order to smell like a compact blend,
    that can sand alone either as a base or a complete fragrance.
    Question : Is there a way to speed up this process?

  2. #2

    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Seems like this is pretty normal...

    The Art and Craft of Perfumery is not a fast discipline, but a fairly contemplative one.

    PK
    Paul Kiler
    PK Perfumes
    http://www.PKPERFUMES.com
    Gold Medal for "Best Aroma"; Los Angeles Artisan Fragrance Salon

  3. #3

    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Prayers?
    I once saw on youtube someone using those magnetic blenders, but no idea how helpful this practice is..

  4. #4

    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Quote Originally Posted by evinick View Post
    Happy new year to all professional and amateur perfumers around!

    My new "problem" (lol) has to do with the blending/curing/maturing process of my "wannabe" fragrances.
    I have noticed that almost all of them need at least 3 or even 4 months in order to smell like a compact blend,
    that can sand alone either as a base or a complete fragrance.
    Question : Is there a way to speed up this process?
    Yes there is: warmth

    For many common chemical reactions at or near room temperature, the reaction rate doubles for every 10 degree Celsius increase in temperature and this includes those which take place in a maturing perfume. This Ďnatural lawí (in inverted commas because it does not always apply) is based on the Arrhenius equation, which posits that the rate of a reaction doubles for every 10 degrees rise in temperature.

    In commercial perfumery new fragrances are routinely age-tested at ~40 Centigrate for about 12 weeks in order to approximate the ageing effects that would occur over 12 months at ~20 Centigrade.

    Where speed is of the essence testing for 3 weeks at 60 Centigrade might be use to the same end, but because perfumery materials are almost without exception organic compounds this is less reliable an indicator: some chemists believe that the Arrhenius equation does not apply above body temperature (or thereabouts) as many organic reactions are accelerated above this temperature beyond that predicted by the equation.

    In practical terms this means that I routinely mature my fragrances in a warm room, but store them once maturation is complete under refrigeration until they are sold. This ensures maximum consistency. Fragrances under test are always kept in warm conditions as it is important to know how they will develop over the medium to long term.

    Hope that helps.
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Chris,
    Any risk of explosions at temps between 40C & 60C?
    I've warmed bottles of diluted AC's on a 50C hot plate (digital temp control) and promptly forgot about them only to have the rubber bulbs explode.
    Justin E. Beasley

  6. #6

    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Reading Chris' comments on using warmth - for a long time now I've been using a USB coffee warmer for this sort of thing. You can get them for a couple of dollars on eBay and they don't get overly hot, just warm enough to help with dissolving stubborn things and to speed up maturation of a blend. Just have it sitting on your bench and it's ready to go whenever you need a warm pad. Saves messing around with water baths.
    Today's handy tip.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    Reading Chris' comments on using warmth - for a long time now I've been using a USB coffee warmer for this sort of thing. You can get them for a couple of dollars on eBay and they don't get overly hot, just warm enough to help with dissolving stubborn things and to speed up maturation of a blend. Just have it sitting on your bench and it's ready to go whenever you need a warm pad. Saves messing around with water baths.
    Today's handy tip.
    Great idea Mark, thanks for the tip, cheap too!
    Justin E. Beasley

  8. #8

    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Quote Originally Posted by JEBeasley View Post
    Chris,
    Any risk of explosions at temps between 40C & 60C?
    I've warmed bottles of diluted AC's on a 50C hot plate (digital temp control) and promptly forgot about them only to have the rubber bulbs explode.
    I probably should have been a bit clearer about how I do this. As an example Iím currently doing an ambergris tincture, which needs to be kept at about 37 Centigrade with constant agitation: Iím using a heater / stirrer to achieve this and the tincture is in a large Simax bottle: these are strong but to avoid problems I nevertheless ensure the pressure is as even as possible by releasing the lid for a while as it gets up to temperature and then sealing it firmly after that (to avoid the alcohol evaporating away).

    Up to about 50 Centigrade or so this is quite safe as long as youíre using good quality, strong containers. For things that donít need stirring, or which need higher temperatures, I use an aluminium flask (lacquered, otherwise you might get reactions with the aluminium) a 0.5Kg to 5Kg flask will fit onto the heater/stirrer quite readily and thatís the larges amount I normally have to heat.

    Rubber bulbs are, as youíve discovered, a no-no for this sort of work.
    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    I probably should have been a bit clearer about how I do this. As an example I’m currently doing an ambergris tincture, which needs to be kept at about 37 Centigrade with constant agitation: I’m using a heater / stirrer to achieve this and the tincture is in a large Simax bottle: these are strong but to avoid problems I nevertheless ensure the pressure is as even as possible by releasing the lid for a while as it gets up to temperature and then sealing it firmly after that (to avoid the alcohol evaporating away).

    Up to about 50 Centigrade or so this is quite safe as long as you’re using good quality, strong containers. For things that don’t need stirring, or which need higher temperatures, I use an aluminium flask (lacquered, otherwise you might get reactions with the aluminium) a 0.5Kg to 5Kg flask will fit onto the heater/stirrer quite readily and that’s the larges amount I normally have to heat.

    Rubber bulbs are, as you’ve discovered, a no-no for this sort of work.
    Thanks for elaborating Chris, I had a feeling there was something more to it, hahaha. There's nothing quite like being totally immersed in a blissful state of blending immersion when suddenly a loud pop erupts from the corner of the room and everything gets sprayed with a fine mist of guaiacwood or cashemeran, etc.
    Justin E. Beasley

  10. #10

    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    As Chris and I discussed in another thread several months ago, when heating liquids you should leave adequate headspace to account for the build up in pressure from liquid and gas expansion. If you do as Chris suggested above and release the lid while the liquid gets up to temperature, then you won't need to leave as much headspace, ofcourse but it's still a good idea to leave some space.
    Last edited by Pears; 8th January 2014 at 11:04 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Quote Originally Posted by Pears View Post
    As Chris and I discussed in another thread several months ago, when heating liquids you should leave adequate head space to account for the build up in pressure from liquid and gas expansion. If you do as Chris suggested above and release the lid while the liquid gets up to temperature, then you won't need to leave as much headspace, ofcourse but you should still some space.
    More good info, thanks Pears.
    Justin E. Beasley

  12. #12

    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Great info indeed, Thanks everyone and especially Chris for his scientific approach to this matter.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    After reading Arctander's description of ultrasonic assisted distillations I've been searching out information on the subject and experimenting with ultrasonic frequencies on the bench. Sonochemistry is way outside of my educational experience but it seems as though it might be applicable to this subject since ultrasonic frequencies are known to speed up certain chemical processes.
    Justin E. Beasley

  14. #14

    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    Reading Chris' comments on using warmth - for a long time now I've been using a USB coffee warmer for this sort of thing. You can get them for a couple of dollars on eBay and they don't get overly hot, just warm enough to help with dissolving stubborn things and to speed up maturation of a blend. Just have it sitting on your bench and it's ready to go whenever you need a warm pad. Saves messing around with water baths.
    Today's handy tip.
    I've used a tabletop space heater before, set on low, to hurry up tinctures. It was probably a bad idea, but when you lack formal perfumer training you do any number of silly things (which, as far as you know, could be the etymology of "silliage").

  15. #15

    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    I think Jeroen suggested just the opposite - putting the mix in the fridge. I'm a bit confused..

  16. #16
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    Default Re: How to speed up the blending/curing process of a fragrance

    Quote Originally Posted by Nizan View Post
    I think Jeroen suggested just the opposite - putting the mix in the fridge. I'm a bit confused..
    Fridge for long term storage. Heat to speed the aging process. So, in essence what I gather is that you could start by heating your mixture in order to age it quickly and then store it in the fridge long term. Or, if you don't want to bother with heating then throw it in the fridge and let it age the long way.
    Justin E. Beasley

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