Code of Conduct
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 31 to 60 of 103
  1. #31
    Basenotes Junkie mossyoakpenn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    534

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    I have to chime in on this one. Im a recent frag addict. The more I read on here the more I realized I was supposed to like "challenging" frags. And I tried them and a few I actually liked. Of those I liked, I wore them around my sister who knew of my frag obsession. Her response....."eww, what are you wearing?" I read somewhere that perfumery was created to mask body odors with good smells because a bath wasn't available. Now, how in the world did perfumery turn into a clean, fresh body masked with 'foul' smells? What an ironic twist.....

  2. #32

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Oud in a nutshell

    Once you become accustomed to it (which isn't very hard) it's incredibly addictive but it always has that barnyard note. Most people's reaction to a decent oud is "that's weird" or "foul"... Then watch as their opinion is turned on it's head.

    Sent from my HTC One

  3. #33
    Dependent onethinline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    1,380

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by martinijo View Post
    It's just the fecal note in Rive Gauche that I draw the line at
    Reminds me a lot of that fecal note in Mugler Cologne!

  4. #34
    Super Member Petrichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    155
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by mossyoakpenn View Post
    I read somewhere that perfumery was created to mask body odors with good smells because a bath wasn't available. Now, how in the world did perfumery turn into a clean, fresh body masked with 'foul' smells? What an ironic twist.....
    Yes, I know that's the stereotype, but I'm pretty sure it just isn't true. Perfumery is thousands of years old (not a couple hundred), and no doubt there a a million and one different motivations behind people wearing various oils and extracts and balms, etc. To cover allegedly "bad" body odors may be one motive, but it certainly isn't the only one. Kings were anointed with fragrant oils, royalty bathed in scented baths, etc. Some recent science seems to think that people have chosen to "scent" themselves throughout history for biological reasons: to actually enhance their natural odor (see this OUP article: http://m.beheco.oxfordjournals.org/c.../12/2/140.full). Interesting stuff to consider.
    Check out my personal blog: http://stayathomedadfindsacologne.com

    "Perfume and incense make the heart glad..."

    -Proverbs 27:9

  5. #35
    Dependent onethinline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    1,380

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Yep. There's a whole approach to perfume which is more about working with natural body odors (as in, the alluring and sorta sexy kind) rather than against them. My understanding is that's a perspective of classical French perfumery. The usual observation here is that the French are less obsessed with being constantly sanitized and free of all body odor, as Americans are, and are more prone to welcome natural manly or womanly scents as desirable. That's a big generalization of course. I'm personally no fan of significant B.O., but I do appreciate the warm intimate smells of a lover's body, and I think it's that sort of intimacy and sultriness that these musky notes we're discussing evoke.

  6. #36
    Máscara Almizclado
    Arij's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Montréal
    Posts
    1,802

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Pheromones elicit a powerful subconscious effect on behavior, nuff said.
    Currently wearing: Tommy by Tommy Hilfiger

  7. #37

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Its rough of the top but Mazzorlori-Lui is excellent

    +1-MR-FMalle
    +1-APLS-MFK
    Last edited by trex57; 7th January 2014 at 10:07 PM.
    Currently wearing: Ambra Nera by Ortigia

  8. #38

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by onethinline View Post
    Reminds me a lot of that fecal note in Mugler Cologne!
    No feces in MC, perhaps you mean semen?
    Currently wearing: Tardes by Carner Barcelona

  9. #39

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    I'm not into that stuff at all.

    The only fragrance I like that has a bit of a dirty skank (ha!) behind it is Vikt, by Slumberhouse, and it's pretty far back there and muted.

    Stuff like APLS, 1740, MKK, Kouros, etc, I have an intense aversion to. And I wouldn't want to smell that way either.
    Last edited by Buysblind; 7th January 2014 at 11:32 PM.

  10. #40

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Musc Ravageur
    Kouros

    Skankiness, both of them.

  11. #41
    Dependent onethinline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    1,380

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by JiveHippo View Post
    No feces in MC, perhaps you mean semen?
    I meant that there's as much feces in Mugler Cologne as there is in Rive Gauche Pour Homme.

  12. #42
    Super Member Petrichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    155
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by onethinline View Post
    Yep. There's a whole approach to perfume which is more about working with natural body odors (as in, the alluring and sorta sexy kind) rather than against them. My understanding is that's a perspective of classical French perfumery. The usual observation here is that the French are less obsessed with being constantly sanitized and free of all body odor, as Americans are, and are more prone to welcome natural manly or womanly scents as desirable. That's a big generalization of course. I'm personally no fan of significant B.O., but I do appreciate the warm intimate smells of a lover's body, and I think it's that sort of intimacy and sultriness that these musky notes we're discussing evoke.
    Well said, I think. This is exactly the sort of explanation I was after, and really helps as I think through WHY I (and others) seem to particularly enjoy some of these fragrances.
    Check out my personal blog: http://stayathomedadfindsacologne.com

    "Perfume and incense make the heart glad..."

    -Proverbs 27:9

  13. #43

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by onethinline View Post
    I meant that there's as much feces in Mugler Cologne as there is in Rive Gauche Pour Homme.
    I know man, just jokin around.
    Currently wearing: Tardes by Carner Barcelona

  14. #44
    Dependent Akahina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    3,683

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    If you want to smell fresh and clean there are plenty of fragrances that smell like fresh laundry of flowers and fruit. But a little stank adds deapth and allure to a perfume. I for one love a touch (or more) of a dirty note in a perfume. It adds allure and a bit of mystery to the scent and to the wearer. Many of my favorite scents have already been mentioned so I will not repeat them, but everyone should try some of those mentioned stink scents. Leather Oud for one has a reputation for being naughty and dirty but it is by far my most complemented scent. Most common reaction from my co-workers is a hug, a big sniff and "you smell wonderful!"
    Some Favorites
    1. Amouage Epic man
    2. Dior Leather Oud
    3. Perris Monte Carlo Oud Imperial Black
    4. Le Labo Patchouli 24
    5. Amouage Opus VII
    6. Byredo Bullion
    7. Masque Milano Russian Tea


    Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind.

  15. #45

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by dougczar View Post
    Do many people walk into public bathroom and take an extra deep breath with a little smile? I always held my breath if I ever had the misfortune of stepping into a Porta John. Do those of you who like dirty and fecal scents also kinda enjoy those also? Just curious.
    Agreed with your entire post, but especially LOL'd at this part.

  16. #46
    Dependent onethinline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    1,380

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by JiveHippo View Post
    I know man, just jokin around.
    Figured you were.

  17. #47
    Super Member Petrichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    155
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by Akahina View Post
    If you want to smell fresh and clean there are plenty of fragrances that smell like fresh laundry of flowers and fruit. But a little stank adds deapth and allure to a perfume. I for one love a touch (or more) of a dirty note in a perfume. It adds allure and a bit of mystery to the scent and to the wearer. Many of my favorite scents have already been mentioned so I will not repeat them, but everyone should try some of those mentioned stink scents. Leather Oud for one has a reputation for being naughty and dirty but it is by far my most complemented scent. Most common reaction from my co-workers is a hug, a big sniff and "you smell wonderful!"
    Really appreciate these thoughts too, Akahina. I'm also starting to feel left out of the Leather Oud club by this point, so I guess I better move Leather Oud to the very top of my "to sample" list. Sounds like I've been missing out
    Check out my personal blog: http://stayathomedadfindsacologne.com

    "Perfume and incense make the heart glad..."

    -Proverbs 27:9

  18. #48
    Dependent onethinline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    1,380

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by Akahina View Post
    Leather Oud for one has a reputation for being naughty and dirty but it is by far my most complemented scent. Most common reaction from my co-workers is a hug, a big sniff and "you smell wonderful!"
    In a way this says a lot in itself. I've worn Leather Oud to work any number of times, and when I've asked coworkers (whom I'm friends with) to smell it up close, as I was afraid it was indeed too dirty or naughty smelling, invariably the response was, "that smells good!" For all its reputation as "stinky" or "skanky," Leather Oud wears well and gets compliments from non-fragrance nerds.

    That leads to another thought: many of the animalic-tinged fragrances mentioned here tend to develop and calm down once worn on actual skin -- the dirty musks tend to soften, and the fragrance tends to meld more with the wearer's skin and body chemistry. Doubtless this is exactly what's intended by the perfumers and houses, who extensively test on skin. Yet we are in an era and culture which wants a quick judgement on everything as a buyable commodity, so we spray one of these on a card, sniff once or twice, form a very quick negative (or at least, surprised) impression, and that's it. Too bad, as we're missing out on some of the better fragrance experiences and a whole side of what scent can do. Doesn't help when you add in preconceptions formed by reading too much on Basenotes (and smelling too little), either.

  19. #49

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    I too am no fan of animalic fragrances. Just too barnyard for me. Probably the most animalic-leaning fragrance I'd be willing to wear is Musc Ravageur, and I don't think I'd be wearing it to work. Just too risky.

    I sampled Leather Oud when it came out some time ago, totally not for me. Wayyyy too animalic, can't picture myself ever wearing it. I don't understand how someone can enjoy wearing those types of fragrances, but I respect it. To each their own.

  20. #50

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    I've been trying to find out for more than a year what the French term for the slightly rotten or animalic facet of a perfume is. I read a particular French perfumery term for just the thing that is under discussion here but can't remember. Can anyone tell me?
    '...And you'll carry me down on your dancing
    To the pools that you lift on your wrist...'

  21. #51
    zatarain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    734

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by Strollyourlobster View Post
    I've been trying to find out for more than a year what the French term for the slightly stinky animalic facet of a perfume is. I read a particular French perfumery term for just the thing that is under discussion here but can't remember. Can anyone tell me?
    I think the word you are looking for is pudeur.
    Behemoth cut a slice of pineapple, salted it, peppered it, ate it, and then tossed off a second glass of alcohol so dashingly that everyone applauded.

  22. #52

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by zatarain View Post
    I think the word you are looking for is pudeur.
    I'm sooo grateful, zatarain. I've been wracking my brain and googling in vain for a year! And because I don't speak French I thought maybe it was 'poudre' and had been looking that up again and again. Thanks!
    '...And you'll carry me down on your dancing
    To the pools that you lift on your wrist...'

  23. #53
    zatarain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    734

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Glad I could help!
    Behemoth cut a slice of pineapple, salted it, peppered it, ate it, and then tossed off a second glass of alcohol so dashingly that everyone applauded.

  24. #54

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by Petrichor View Post
    Yes, I know that's the stereotype, but I'm pretty sure it just isn't true. Perfumery is thousands of years old (not a couple hundred), and no doubt there a a million and one different motivations behind people wearing various oils and extracts and balms, etc. To cover allegedly "bad" body odors may be one motive, but it certainly isn't the only one. Kings were anointed with fragrant oils, royalty bathed in scented baths, etc. Some recent science seems to think that people have chosen to "scent" themselves throughout history for biological reasons: to actually enhance their natural odor (see this OUP article: http://m.beheco.oxfordjournals.org/c.../12/2/140.full). Interesting stuff to consider.
    I think it's unlikely that scent evolved in order to cover up bodily odours. The places where fragrance evolved - Egypt, the Middle East - all had highly evolved traditions of cleanliness. Perfume came to the West via the Crusades - the Frankish soldiers where horrified and revolted by the cleanliness of the Byzantines and Saracens. This is well documented: they regarded it as effeminate and ungodly. But they gradually picked up these very habits, and brought them back to Europe.

    I also think that one of the reasons we associate these scents with 'stank' and 'skank' is that, in the main, we're largely divorced from activities that bring us into contact with strong natural aromas. A lot of these fragrances that get labelled with the vague dismissive 'skank' don't smell like body parts at all, but they do invoke things many of us don't experience on a day to day basis: raw spices, freshly cut wood, aged cheese and meats, saps and resins, livestock. These are in-your-face fragrances of the natural world, but perhaps we shy away from them because we recognize our own animal nature in them, and we seem prepared, as a species, to go to almost any length to deny that we are, in fact, animals...

  25. #55
    Super Member noirtomford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    273
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Blue sugar

  26. #56

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Complex by Boadicea
    Red for Men by Giorgio BH
    Givenchy Gentleman
    Currently wearing: Hamptons by Bond No. 9

  27. #57
    Basenotes Junkie saminlondon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Paris
    Posts
    864

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Odilon and onethinline have made some excellent observations here. I think it boils down to the fact that a certain number of 'animalic' scents are comforting, sensual and, yes, grounding. After all, in terms of DNA there's not much percentage-wise to distinguish us from dogs or even fruit flies.

    I do detect a certain fear of physicality (or is it mortality) coming from some cultures - the US in particular - exhibited in a liking for fresh, soapy, squeaky-clean scents. And in a near obsession with 'skank', which is not something I'd ever heard of before reading Basenotes (the word doesn't exist in British English, as far as I am aware.).

  28. #58
    Super Member Petrichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    155
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by OdilonRedon View Post
    These are in-your-face fragrances of the natural world, but perhaps we shy away from them because we recognize our own animal nature in them, and we seem prepared, as a species, to go to almost any length to deny that we are, in fact, animals...
    Quote Originally Posted by saminlondon View Post
    I do detect a certain fear of physicality (or is it mortality) coming from some cultures - the US in particular - exhibited in a liking for fresh, soapy, squeaky-clean scents.
    Exactly right, I think. Elsewhere, I've wrote about a possible correlation between hyper-cleanliness (and its acceptance of, and accommodation towards, inexpensive aromachemical-laden cleaning-product fragrances) and a youth obsessed, death-denying culture (and so also denying our animal nature). Jean-Claude Ellena discussed the shift toward squeaky "clean" fine fragrance that occurred in the late seventies to mid-eighties in his first book. Incidentally, he also discusses that this was exactly the time period when the entire perfume industry moved to an American, market-driven business model rather than the older French luxury-goods model.

    Americans allegedly just wanted to smell clean. The perfume industry gave them what they wanted.

    That's why I think there is some link with time and culture that influences our (supposed) like/dislike of animalic notes in perfumery. It's why the topic of food perception and preference is a fascinating analogy.

    This entire thread has been very helpful in thinking through the reasons why funky/skanky/nasty or animalic notes can be polarizing, and also why many find them so irresistible.
    Last edited by Petrichor; 8th January 2014 at 03:46 PM.
    Check out my personal blog: http://stayathomedadfindsacologne.com

    "Perfume and incense make the heart glad..."

    -Proverbs 27:9

  29. #59
    Dependent onethinline's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    1,380

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Some quick work on Google revealed this fascinating entry on the word pudeur as used with regard to fragrance. Pudeur means modesty, discretion, shame, so it's interesting that in the context of perfume it refers to adding a bit of naughtiness. In the blog entry the author suggests that hiding something sultry and dirty in the context of pretty florals or whatnot offers a cover of modesty over what is a lascivious intention. I love the tension and dynamic in that construction. Another reason to find these sort of compositions fascinating.

  30. #60
    Super Member Petrichor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    155
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: The "best" fragrances have something "foul" or "nasty" about them?

    Quote Originally Posted by onethinline View Post
    In the blog entry the author suggests that hiding something sultry and dirty in the context of pretty florals or whatnot offers a cover of modesty over what is a lascivious intention. I love the tension and dynamic in that construction. Another reason to find these sort of compositions fascinating.
    Thanks for the article reference. I'm definitely on board with your summary, too.
    Check out my personal blog: http://stayathomedadfindsacologne.com

    "Perfume and incense make the heart glad..."

    -Proverbs 27:9

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 35
    Last Post: 31st December 2013, 03:06 PM
  2. Favorite "smell good"/"safe"/"blind buy" scent?
    By tommygunz in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 84
    Last Post: 5th May 2013, 09:06 AM
  3. "Angel Man" or "La nuit de l'homme" or "L'Instant De Guerlain"
    By sideburns in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 3rd November 2012, 12:01 PM
  4. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 14th July 2012, 03:04 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000