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  1. #1

    Default Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Within the community I notice that one of the most commonly used adjectives to describe a scent is "boozy". Though, I do hear it, I don't believe I actually smell much that is reminiscent to actual booze as the term may imply, nothing like liquor.

    For example a scent like Pure Malt, noted as being boozy, said to smell like whiskey, I don't see it. I find that with scents of a particularly sweet nature people tend to equate it to booze, which leaves me bamboozled. Another one I hear of is L'humaniste, said to have a gin note, not liquor like or boozy at all in my eyes(nose).

    After trying quite a few scents said to be boozy, I've only found one that was really true to form, Krigler's Established Cognac, which on the other hand has an authentic and true to forum liquor note.

    Am I alone here? Am I the only who thinks this term is just thrown around a little bit too much, which I feel is a tad bit misleading.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Yup, extremely agreed. These people obviously never actually smelled or tasted any booze. Alcohol is disgusting, sharp, repulsive and regurgitating inducing to me, nowhere near sweet. Opposite end of spectrum in fact.

    Then again if someone was an alcoholic...

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  3. #3

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    I was just thinking this a few days ago, and I'm definitely guilty of it. I really don't have an answer, but I agree about the usage of the word.

    Another one of my interests is scotch, and I think one of the things people assume about scotch, like with fragrances, is that it's more similar to cooking than it is science. With scotch, if someone detects a note of cinnamon, for example, it's not because someone actually opened up a maturing barrel and tossed a few teaspoons of cinnamon in there, but instead because the chemicals that give cinnamon its taste were present in the barrel, thus giving off that flavor. The same is with fragrances: sure there are essential oils from rose and bergamot, but at the end of the day we're talking about chemical products produced in labs.

    I bring this up because I think, at the end of the day, we're all just doing our best to describe fragrances, because the science itself goes way over most of our heads. So, I don't really have a problem with people describing fragrances as "boozy". I just sort of guess what they mean by it. I think for me personally, I tend to describe scents that have a warm, syrupy quality to them as boozy.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    I drink and I know what booziness means. Fusion Sacre pour Lui is all about that

  5. #5

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by CapriDog View Post
    I drink and I know what booziness means. Fusion Sacre pour Lui is all about that
    Care to elaborate, many drink, what do you drink and how does this relate to that in particular, like perhaps what is this reminiscent of?

  6. #6

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    I guess a bit? I mean boozy doesn't just mean that it smells like liquor if that's what you were thinking. It's kind of hard to describe, a guess just extremely smooth and somewhat reminiscent of some kind of liquor.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Pure Malt is probably one of my least "boozy" scents that have been labelled that around the community but I still see somewhat of the resemblance. I haven't tried L'Humaniste but Adventure Quasar by J del Pozo really reminds me of a gin and tonic. Another boozy fragrance is Idole de Lubin by Lubin. It has a very potent rum note to it.

    I think you might be missing booziness in these fragrances because they don't specifically smell like alcohol. Just try to search for that part of the fragrance that resembles the booziness instead of expecting them to smell exactly like a fifth of liquor.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by Willanhanyard View Post
    I guess a bit? I mean boozy doesn't just mean that it smells like liquor if that's what you were thinking. It's kind of hard to describe, a guess just extremely smooth and somewhat reminiscent of some kind of liquor.
    I mean if boozy isn't a direct reference to that of alcohol/liquor/booze, then what is it then?

  9. #9

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by mlsweeney View Post
    Pure Malt is probably one of my least "boozy" scents that have been labelled that around the community but I still see somewhat of the resemblance. I haven't tried L'Humaniste but Adventure Quasar by J del Pozo really reminds me of a gin and tonic. Another boozy fragrance is Idole de Lubin by Lubin. It has a very potent rum note to it.

    I think you might be missing booziness in these fragrances because they don't specifically smell like alcohol. Just try to search for that part of the fragrance that resembles the booziness instead of expecting them to smell exactly like a fifth of liquor.
    I feel there is a difference between persuading the audience to a concept, but if you're going to use terminology like "boozy/booziness", I expect it to be relative to booze. Like I understand somethings may invoke an idea and I can grasp that, but with that being said, that is differentiated from being authentic and true to form. I feel otherwise, there are better adjectives that are more appropriate for referencing.

    Krigler's Established Cognac, is definitely not misleading and does more then just imply the idea, but stays true to form and congruent to the name.
    Last edited by yteek; 2nd March 2014 at 02:16 AM.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Whats a true boozy fragrance that . . .

    1) Can be worn year round?
    2) Is great for the summer weather?

  11. #11

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by Flatbush Ave View Post
    Whats a true boozy fragrance that . . .

    1) Can be worn year round?
    2) Is great for the summer weather?
    2. I'd say maybe Virign Island Water, kinda like Malibu rum.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by yteek View Post
    Care to elaborate, many drink, what do you drink and how does this relate to that in particular, like perhaps what is this reminiscent of?
    love to but not atm... Good buzz right now

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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    I see the term around a bit, but not too often. As some have pointed out, it can mean many things, presumably because the booze of choice varies. And liquors smell very different, rhum, whiskey, all the way to gin and European bitter liquors. I think most people probably use the term for something rich and warm, like rhum.

    Which brings one to summer booze...Not sure, perhaps gin? (ie Penhaligon Juniper Sling?)

    cacio

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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    For me, if a fragrance has a prominent "rum" note and I can decipher the rum note like in Idole by Lubin, it's boozy to me.
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    The only terms I think that are overused are:

    Panty-dropper
    Generic
    Well-blended
    Synthetic


    I don't really see "boozy" applied too loosely or where it doesn't really apply.
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Doug:

    this raises the obvious question: which perfume is truly a generic, well-blended panty-dropper? A plus if it's also boozy.

    cacio

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post
    Doug:

    this raises the obvious question: which perfume is truly a generic, well-blended panty-dropper? A plus if it's also boozy.

    cacio
    You forgot synthetic as well.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    I don't think it's overused, but I do feel like when some people use certain terms like "boozy" they don't really know what the hell it means.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by yteek View Post
    I feel there is a difference between persuading the audience to a concept, but if you're going to use terminology like "boozy/booziness", I expect it to be relative to booze. Like I understand somethings may invoke an idea and I can grasp that, but with that being said, that is differentiated from being authentic and true to form. I feel otherwise, there are better adjectives that are more appropriate for referencing.

    Krigler's Established Cognac, is definitely not misleading and does more then just imply the idea, but stays true to form and congruent to the name.
    People perceive fragrances differently though. Pure Malt has some sort of a whiskey vibe to it albeit very vague. I still consider it a boozy scent because when I first smelled it, I thought of some flavored type of whiskey. Does it truly smell like whiskey? No, but the vibe is there and I don't think we need to be that strict on how we label our fragrances.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by dougczar View Post
    The only terms I think that are overused are:

    Panty-dropper
    Generic
    Well-blended
    Synthetic


    I don't really see "boozy" applied too loosely or where it doesn't really apply.
    Niche and quality ingredients are the ones I see over used, by millions of miles

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  21. #21

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    I like the term. It is used well here I think. I wore Idole EdP yesterday, and 1270 today, Ooo, lah, lah! heady stuff, yes boozy, among other things of course.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Some smells aren't clear chit like the smell of rose or lemon. So boozy could be anything that has the effect. Have you smelled balls bean pods? They smell a bit boozy too.
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  23. #23
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    I think of Frapin 1697 when I think of boozy. It doesn't smell like a bottle of booze, but makes me think of liqueurs, the rich heavy sweet alcohol scent. I don't see it getting tons of use either.
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  24. #24
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    I think you misinterpret what is meant by BOOZY.

    It's not the alcohol note, as in ethanol, we think of, when we say boozy.

    It's if a fragrance reminds us of a certain type of alcohol - that could be red wine, beer, whiskey, gin, rum, cognac....etc.
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  25. #25

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by CHSeifert View Post
    I think you misinterpret what is meant by BOOZY.

    It's not the alcohol note, as in ethanol, we think of, when we say boozy.

    It's if a fragrance reminds us of a certain type of alcohol - that could be red wine, beer, whiskey, gin, rum, cognac....etc.
    I don't think it really is that hard to comprehend, booze is just another term for alcoholic beverages as you listed above, which consist of ethanol. Taking a whiff from any one of those bottles and then compare to what some would say is their perfume counterpart, half the time you may find yourself questioning where this presumption comes from if challenged side by side.

    Unlike with food where the term is also used, booze is actually put into the concoction, where as it can be easier to pinpoint and take recognition. With fragrance, it is usually an accord of notes that attempt to portray this effect, while some can pull it off, some on the other hand fail to replicate and fall short of persuading with the scent alone, guarantee with an added mention of alcohol in the description or note breakdown and everyone falls for the craze.

    Usually when I see the term thrown around it's amongst sweet and/or dessert scents that are perhaps syrupy but I wouldn't call that boozy. I see everything being called boozy, if not just overused perhaps misused as well.

    I don't know perhaps it is the industry and the community that throw on the applied meaning for the imaginations to run wild. Like Tuscan Leather with the notorious gossip of a cocaine note, I think it is just hoopla, but rather it exist or not, with that mention alone, the imaginations will take us to where our hearts desire and if that is what you choose to believe then the placebo effect alone may make the experience what it is.

    Another theory I'm pondering as perhaps in the opening of some scents, the perfumer's alcohol may trick some into jumping the gun on the idea it may be "boozy", but that is just a theory.
    Last edited by yteek; 2nd March 2014 at 06:02 AM.

  26. #26

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by mlsweeney View Post
    People perceive fragrances differently though. Pure Malt has some sort of a whiskey vibe to it albeit very vague. I still consider it a boozy scent because when I first smelled it, I thought of some flavored type of whiskey. Does it truly smell like whiskey? No, but the vibe is there and I don't think we need to be that strict on how we label our fragrances.
    Sure they do, but I'd have a hard time believing if it weren't for the name of the scent alone, the concept of it being relatable to whiskey would not come to mind. I actually made an effort to take a whiff from the bottle and boy I'd say if not anything but a long shot of dotted lines to make that connection.

  27. #27
    Basenotes Junkie NYCBoomBoom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    I do find the term to be overused but in some ways I think it's partly because 'boozy' encompasses a lot of different notes/scents that one might encounter and in part because each of us might get something different out of the same fragrance. A perfect example is Pure Malt, which I do find 'boozy' yet some, evidently, do not.

  28. #28

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Something like Pure Malt isn't going to smell that boozy—because it's just stack of synthetic fruit notes with some wood underneath. But if you look into higher end perfumery, you find materials such as Rum Absolute or Whiskey Lactone that really are producing boozy results. There's a great rum note in Montecristo, for example, and a fantastic whiskey note in several Slumberhouse scents. The cost and quality of these materials, though, is such that you'll never see it in something like Pure Malt (Rum Absolute is almost $20k for a kilo). So yes, at times the term is incorrectly used as more of a marketing tool, but if you look hard enough, you'll certainly find scents that play the boozy card with great dexterity.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    In my opinion, while somewhat to often and inaccurately used, there are still fragrances where this adjective fits, especially if their notes develop into something reminding of the actual scent notes/nosing impressions of certain alcoholic drink, rather than the sheer alcohol (likely to be found but not smelled, since it tends to be neutral, in any fragrance using alcohol as a fixative).

  30. #30

    Default Re: Is The Term "BOOZY" Overused?

    Quote Originally Posted by CHSeifert View Post
    I think you misinterpret what is meant by BOOZY.

    It's not the alcohol note, as in ethanol, we think of, when we say boozy.

    It's if a fragrance reminds us of a certain type of alcohol - that could be red wine, beer, whiskey, gin, rum, cognac....etc.
    I agree, I think boozy is referring to the overall essence of a libation, meaning you can't really pin-point it but it has that impression

    Quote Originally Posted by yteek View Post
    I don't think it really is that hard to comprehend, booze is just another term for alcoholic beverages as you listed above, which consist of ethanol. Taking a whiff from any one of those bottles and then compare to what some would say is their perfume counterpart, half the time you may find yourself questioning where this presumption comes from if challenged side by side.

    Unlike with food where the term is also used, booze is actually put into the concoction, where as it can be easier to pinpoint and take recognition. With fragrance, it is usually an accord of notes that attempt to portray this effect, while some can pull it off, some on the other hand fail to replicate and fall short of persuading with the scent alone, guarantee with an added mention of alcohol in the description or note breakdown and everyone falls for the craze.

    Usually when I see the term thrown around it's amongst sweet and/or dessert scents that are perhaps syrupy but I wouldn't call that boozy. I see everything being called boozy, if not just overused perhaps misused as well.

    I don't know perhaps it is the industry and the community that throw on the applied meaning for the imaginations to run wild. Like Tuscan Leather with the notorious gossip of a cocaine note, I think it is just hoopla, but rather it exist or not, with that mention alone, the imaginations will take us to where our hearts desire and if that is what you choose to believe then the placebo effect alone may make the experience what it is.

    Another theory I'm pondering as perhaps in the opening of some scents, the perfumer's alcohol may trick some into jumping the gun on the idea it may be "boozy", but that is just a theory.
    A lot of it starts from the power of suggestion and people run with it.

    [Insert marketing here] Thierry Mugler is a master at it. They are selling their concept or essence of whatever it may be.

    Wether it be Pure Malt or Pure Coffee. For instance, this Fall it will be Pure Wood. I'm not expecting it to be woodsy per se but I'm sure it will leave an impression or concept of either a pile of freshly chopped wood or a standing grove of Fir trees. I'm pretty sure woodsy will definitely be thrown around a lot to describe it and capture its essence. And from there ... Mugler's cartoon version of it will be created

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