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  1. #31

    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by Igor01 View Post
    Big aluminium containers stamped "Black Agar GIVCO 215" are nothing of the sort, regardless of how much the SA at the Creed counter is melting with delight about "helping poor villagers in India sustain their traditional way of life searching for the precious wood in the ancient jungle
    Lol! I will never forget the day when a Killian SA approached me with Killian Pure Oud and I in return made her blind smell 3ml of Firmenich's Agarwood blend.......her reaction was automatically how on earth did I manage to get the exact oud used in Killian Pure Oud and it must have cost me an extortionate amount. .......I just laughed and explained that it cost me less than $6! And if interested I could get her 80ml for $74
    She just turned bright red and looked totally perplexed..........
    For some super rare goodies check me out on ebay: scents-rarity
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    Currently wearing: Oudh Al Masarat by Amouage

  2. #32

    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Orientalism and cultural appropriation is playing a significant role.

    Quote Originally Posted by rynegne View Post
    While I like using real oud and wearing it...I doubt many people would share the same sentiments outside of a select few in the Basenotes community
    I like some of the Western ouds, but yes, they bare little resemblance to what oud actually smells like. I can't imagine many people would find the real thing very appealing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marais View Post
    To those of us in the elementary (Western) class, used only to the tame pleasures of Tom Ford Oud Wood, M7, Creed's Royal Oud and that AdP one, can you give us the benefit of your experience of Cambodian Oud? I'm intrigued.
    If you hunt down Phoenicia's RealOud, for example, you'll get a good example what Syoofi smells like—pungent blue cheese and grass.

  3. #33
    Basenotes Institution rynegne's Avatar
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    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Excellent stuff...opens quite dank and closes like a wonderful garden w/ grass, rose and dash of dirt.

    Quote Originally Posted by deadidol View Post
    Phoenicia's RealOud, for example, you'll get a good example what Syoofi smells like—pungent blue cheese and grass.

  4. #34

    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by deadidol View Post

    ... I can't imagine many people would find the real thing very appealing.
    The thing is - there is no one "real thing" when it comes to oud. There are so incredibly diverse within the different species, geographical areals and even the distillation techniques, the scent spectrum is almost limitless. Even within one single oil extracted from one tree there are dozens if not hundreds (or even thousands) of different isomers which when combined give the oud oils their insanely dynamic olfactory richness and crazy scent development as the oils dry down.

    Each oud tree that contains oud will have very different types of oud resin in its different parts, and the resulting aroma will vary greatly depending on the resin's relative position in the tree itself, its age, the resin/oil content and the myriad other factors that contributed to its formation. "Oud" is not a note which can be tried and then liked or disliked. Instead, it's an enormous body of scent profiles and nuances some of which may be repulsive while others - divine. Each one is so complex it will take months if not years to fully appreciate its fine facets.

    Quote Originally Posted by deadidol View Post
    If you hunt down Phoenicia's RealOud, for example, you'll get a good example what Syoofi smells like—pungent blue cheese and grass.
    While Phoenicia's RealOud undoubtedly uses some measure of actual oud oil, I would not wear the fragrance if I was paid to do so. And not because it's somehow "bad" but simply because the type of oud they used is not my cup of tea. Having said that I am sure it finds its own fans, just like I have ouds that I won't part with at (almost) any price.

    Oud is one single natural fragrant ingredient that has within itself a variety not even remotely approachable by any other and I am absolutely convinced that there is an oud for everyone. The sad part is that for most of us it is very hard to discover our true oud taste because the really good pure stuff is so ridiculously hard to find and so retardedly expensive. There's plenty of decent cultivated oils which are relatively affordable and perfectly wearable, but they don't even begin to approach the crazy shocking beauty of the oils from years and decades ago when wild oud was still around in quantity and distillers could use the higher quality wood which in today's word would result in the oils costing thousands of dollars per 1ML even if it were still available in large enough quantities.

    EDIT: As for the pungent blue cheese stink - that's a result of oversoaking of wood prior to distillation, this is routinely done with Indian and some Thai (Cambodi-type) wood to facilitate oil extraction and maximize yield. I cannot stand the typical oversoaked low grade ouds, but the reality is - this is the most common type available on the "pure oud" market, and this is what most people are likely to come by. Needless to say, such encounters leave most very disappointed and confused as to what all the hype is about - this stuff is just plain nasty! When short soaking or no soaking techniques are used as well as better water and careful distillation tweaking, the oils smell completely different - clean, airy, far more nuanced and with their delightful woodiness in plain view. All these notes are usually completely obscured by the cheese and barnyard funk of your typical oversoaked Hindi or "Cambodi" from the large houses who also blend many different batches to achieve scent uniformity and volume.

  5. #35

    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by tensor9 View Post
    What's with the oud craze?
    Oud smells good.

    what's with the rose craze? or the amber craze? or the neroli craze? or the cedar craze?

  6. #36

    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    I just wish the oud craze would end already. I too don't find oud to be anything too compelling. Especially since pretty much every oud fragrance coming out has a high price tag and is focusing on like 2 notes. Either putting oud with rose, amber, or some other note. They often smell similar with slight tweaks.

    I wish there would be a forest craze. Like pine, cypress, juniper notes. Ohhh I would be in heaven!
    My Ultimate Top 5:

    Fahrenheit (1988)
    Le Vetiver Itasca (2010)
    Burberry London (2006)
    Eau des Baux (2006)
    Arpege pour Homme (2005)

  7. #37
    Super Member Tarik's Avatar
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    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    HI all
    Igor, have you smelled Zbh oud (Zero barnyard hindi) .?

  8. #38

    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    This what I wrote to Taha about the ZBH:

    I am loving ZBH! I tend to crave Hindi's when it's cool...and can't wait for the next fall and winter (a crazy thing to say after the mini ice age we've just had) to fully appreciate its warm, sweet, clean un-Hindi Hindiness I still can't believe that an oil this young can come across as such a dignified and accomplished aroma with its elements un-obscured by any fresh still notes. It's complex, balanced and very pretty - a remarkable feat for an un-aged oil! My favourite part is the perfect marriage between the ethereal vapouriness we've first seen in your Aatma and the confident yet aloof woody basenote that gives the oil such a well-rounded character - its crown is up in the clouds but the roots are firmly planted in the soil, and at no point does it come across as just any one of those things but always the sum of all. The other thing I admire about ZBH - how it manages to stay a Hindi while projecting a very archetypal "oudy" aroma without constantly reminding you about its geographical origin, it's a very rare quality in oud oils as I am sure you know I knew I had to have a bottle the minute I first sniffed it from the applicator stick, that hardly ever happens to me... I think this is your best oil to date, Taha - I am happy to see that your hard work on accumulating knowledge, seeking out the best material and equipment and working on fine-tuning and perfecting the distillation methods has paid off in such a spectacular oil, thank you!

  9. #39

    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cologneist View Post
    I just wish the oud craze would end already. I too don't find oud to be anything too compelling. Especially since pretty much every oud fragrance coming out has a high price tag and is focusing on like 2 notes. Either putting oud with rose, amber, or some other note. They often smell similar with slight tweaks.

    I wish there would be a forest craze. Like pine, cypress, juniper notes. Ohhh I would be in heaven!
    Not true! Jovan Oud Intense is not bad at all, and you can get it for next to nothing at the moment. First of all, I'm not sure that I've ever tried "high quality oud," so that may be an issue. Next, like anything else, the other notes in the scent are going to be quite important. Finally, some people seem to either go with a fad or get irritated by it, so it's important to be able to put bias aside. To me, oud can be like a softer version of aldehydes, in terms of texture and structure, but the most important thing is the overall composition. I certainly don't see any reason to pay " big bucks" for an oud scent, but perhaps I have yet to sample expensive ones that I would consider worth buying.

  10. #40
    Basenotes Institution L'Homme Blanc Individuel's Avatar
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    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    I'm going to sum up the oud craze in a few thoughts. And at the end of these two thoughts, it'll be obvious as to why I hope oud sticks around as a note in fragrances.

    Oud blends marvelously into a base. I'll cite two perfect examples: Interlude Man by Amouage, and Bond no. 9's Andy Warhol.

    As of today, by mainstream standards, Oud is different. Tomorrow, that may not be the case and that's fine. Today, many scents use the word "Oud" in their name as a way to generate sales, but is that really so different than Amber? Amber isn't even a note, it's an accord, but nobody balks at Ambre 114, or Ambre Precious, or Prada Amber - which isn't even amber, by the way! It's Ambergris!

    Eventually, some other note will captivate perfumers and perfume buyers, and it will be the new 'thing,' as far as I'm concerned, that will be great.

    We should be thankful some perfumer said "Hey, this is captivating..."
    We should be thankful other perfumers agreed. Why?
    Because we get great perfume.
    And perfumery evolves.

    As perfumer after perfumer starts highlighting a note, does it become a bandwagon at some point? Of course it does. But so what?! Who cares? Some of the bandwagon scents will be garbage and we'll pan them, but others will be fantastic, and we'll be thankful to have them.

    I mean, really now... let's be honest.
    Do we really not want anyone to ever create another amber scent?
    Do we really not want anyone to ever create another leather scent?
    Do we really not want anyone to ever create another incense scent?
    Do we really not want anyone to ever create another tobacco scent?
    Do we really not want anyone to ever create another citrus scent?
    Do we really not want anyone to ever create another musk scent?
    Do we really not want anyone to ever create another rose scent?
    ...I could go on and on and on.

    Yeah, yeah yeah, it's fun to jump on the anti-bandwagon and rant about oud this and oud that... but it would be just as easy to rant about amber this and amber that. Who cares.

    I've smelled some bad ouds.
    I've smelled some good ouds.

    If ten bad ouds get released before there's another good one, I'll still be glad to sniff the one good one. If ten new ambers get released before there's another good one, I'll still be glad to sniff the one good one.

    Don't fall for cliche backlash.

    If you smell a new scent and you think it sucks, say so. But don't write off a note for the sake of hopping on a bandwagon. That's cliche. And, worse, it's lame.
    Current Favorites (not in any particular order)
    Rose 31
    Endymion
    Castile
    APOM
    Curve
    Nio
    Lumiere Noire
    Aqua Celestia
    Royal Water
    Royal Oud
    Petit Matin
    Dior Homme
    Aqua Universalis
    1725 Casanova
    Reflection Man
    Interlude Man
    Grey Vetiver
    Hanae Mori HM EDT
    Currently wearing: Endymion by Penhaligon's

  11. #41

    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigsly View Post
    Not true! Jovan Oud Intense is not bad at all, and you can get it for next to nothing at the moment. First of all, I'm not sure that I've ever tried "high quality oud," so that may be an issue. Next, like anything else, the other notes in the scent are going to be quite important. Finally, some people seem to either go with a fad or get irritated by it, so it's important to be able to put bias aside. To me, oud can be like a softer version of aldehydes, in terms of texture and structure, but the most important thing is the overall composition. I certainly don't see any reason to pay " big bucks" for an oud scent, but perhaps I have yet to sample expensive ones that I would consider worth buying.
    Just the name oud and Jovan in the same line makes me cringe, same with Jacomo and Kanon on the oud bangwagon. Oud essential oil is pretty expensive, so when these cheaper companies make it and sell it at a low price, it's likely just aromachemicals, and other notes producing the oud accord than the note of oud itself. As from what I have heard about Jovan Oud itself, the oud note is barely noticeable in there.
    My Ultimate Top 5:

    Fahrenheit (1988)
    Le Vetiver Itasca (2010)
    Burberry London (2006)
    Eau des Baux (2006)
    Arpege pour Homme (2005)

  12. #42

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    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by Igor01 View Post
    Perhaps this would be true if the now ubiquitous "ouds" weren't marketed as something they are not and sold at a large premium with the excuse of being "rare", "precious" and "mysterious". Big aluminium containers stamped "Black Agar GIVCO 215" are nothing of the sort, regardless of how much the SA at the Creed counter is melting with delight about "helping poor villagers in India sustain their traditional way of life searching for the precious wood in the ancient jungle".

    And as for the experience itself - I'd venture out to say that these "ouds" are at best a pale and profane imitation of life, like what a crude cartoon on a public washroom wall is to actual lovemaking
    Of course, but replace "ouds" in your reply with "roses" or "sandalwood" or just about any other "precious" natural ingredient and the same holds true. Perfume companies have been using "rare," "precious," and "mysterious" along with lots of other BS in their marketing forever. So we're all supposed to clutch our pearls and hyperventilate now because they're doing it with oud?

  13. #43
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    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by EncreNous View Post
    IMO fragrance companies/marketers need to create a buzz around a woody basenote to replace the "need" for Mysore Sandalwood.
    Absolutely agreed. And oud does double duty on that score, because the "sharp" facet of oud replaces oakmoss/chypre, which can no longer serve effectively in that role.
    https://cologniac.com - raging for the machines

  14. #44
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    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by Kagey View Post
    So we're all supposed to clutch our pearls and hyperventilate now because they're doing it with oud?
    LOL!!!

    Did someone say "barnyard oud"? Mercy! Get me to the fainting couch in the tack room!
    https://cologniac.com - raging for the machines

  15. #45
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    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cologneist View Post
    I wish there would be a forest craze. Like pine, cypress, juniper notes. Ohhh I would be in heaven!
    I hear you on that! I just pulled out the uber-balsamic Eau Sauvage Parfum today for a cold wave, and MAN - I just realized that I should have been wearing that one all winter.
    https://cologniac.com - raging for the machines

  16. #46

    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    Quote Originally Posted by Igor01 View Post
    ... .

    EDIT: As for the pungent blue cheese stink - that's a result of oversoaking of wood prior to distillation, this is routinely done with Indian and some Thai (Cambodi-type) wood to facilitate oil extraction and maximize yield. I cannot stand the typical oversoaked low grade ouds, but the reality is - this is the most common type available on the "pure oud" market, and this is what most people are likely to come by. Needless to say, such encounters leave most very disappointed and confused as to what all the hype is about - this stuff is just plain nasty! When short soaking or no soaking techniques are used as well as better water and careful distillation tweaking, the oils smell completely different - clean, airy, far more nuanced and with their delightful woodiness in plain view. All these notes are usually completely obscured by the cheese and barnyard funk of your typical oversoaked Hindi or "Cambodi" from the large houses who also blend many different batches to achieve scent uniformity and volume.
    Thanks so much for explaining, Igor.
    I've come across a few blue cheese-type Ouds and wholly agree - that sh!t's nasty. And I say this as someone who loves both blue cheese and stinky perfumes.

  17. #47
    Renato's Avatar
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    Default Re: What's with the oud craze?

    I'm like you - I don't get it either.
    Nothing wrong with it, but nothing compelling.
    Regards,
    Renato

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