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  1. #1

    Default Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    I am working on a few formulas, and some of them smell nice, but they seem to be missing a very important component.

    The top notes are certainly there, but there is no "sparkle" as I would like to call it.

    Im looking for some aromachemicals that would have the ability to add a tingling effect to the blend. I found that when I added hedione to some of my formulas, it was able to do this to a certain extent, however, my blends still seem a little "flat".

    Does anyone know what can be added to give this effect? Im not exactly trying to create another note, but rather, trying to create a feeling...if that makes any sense.

    Thanks!

    p.s....does benzyl salicylate have the ability to do this?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    I donít think benzyl salicylate will do what you are looking for, at least not on its own. Usually when people talk about tingling and fizz in a perfume itís the aliphatic aldehydes that are meant. If you use some of those (and they are very powerful so you only need traces) then you might well get benefit from using benzyl salicylate alongside them because they can be harsh and it helps to smooth them out and blend them better with the rest of the fragrance.

    Another possibility is that your fragrance is simply lacking in top-notes: in which case adding linealyl acetate, geranyl acetate, ethyl linalyl acetate or things of that sort might help to fix it.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    You may find this thread helpful.

    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/320...g-Amber-accord

  4. #4

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Hello,

    back in time i read about "decenal-4-trans" that it can bring an sparkly cool glitter to an perfume especially with bergamot and other citrusy topnotes imparting an tremendous lift.

    Greetings:

    Hondo

  5. #5

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Top: Aldehyde C-8,9,10 (dilute to 1%) Claritone, Frescile (10%), Vertoliff

    Mid: Hedione, Precyclemone B (1% for sparkle effects)

    Base: Celestolide, Ambrocenide 10% (dilute to 10% = 1%), Okoumal, Karanal (10%), Ultralid

  6. #6

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Aldehyde C-12 MNA is my go-to material for "fizz". To me it almost gives off a carbonated water type of feeling. That combined with something a little more fatty/oily (Ald. C9, Mandarin Aldehyde, etc...) can really work magic on a formula.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Thanks for the tips everyone. Ill have to look into decenal-4-trans.

    I have tried using some of the aldehydes listed above but dont have ethyl linealyl acetate or linealyl acetate.

    Still...my formula seems flat...but what I believe is happening is raspberry ketone (@10% in PG) is deading the formula...anyone have issues with raspberry ketone killing the top notes/tingle in a formula....or could it just be the proplyene glycol doing this and perhaps i should try a different diluent?

    thanks for the tips!

  8. #8

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by Macaul View Post
    Thanks for the tips everyone. Ill have to look into decenal-4-trans.

    I have tried using some of the aldehydes listed above but dont have ethyl linealyl acetate or linealyl acetate.

    Still...my formula seems flat...but what I believe is happening is raspberry ketone (@10% in PG) is deading the formula...anyone have issues with raspberry ketone killing the top notes/tingle in a formula....or could it just be the proplyene glycol doing this and perhaps i should try a different diluent?

    thanks for the tips!
    Ah! OK if your formula is in PG that would certainly explain dead top-notes. Try ethanol instead and youíll almost certainly see an improvement, PG has a huge flattening effect when used as the major solvent.

    Raspberry Ketone might have some deadening effect too - my experience is that you need only traces of this material - if you meant just the PG the raspberry ketone is in then thatís unlikely to be an issue unless youíve used so much that your formula is mostly raspberry jam . . .
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Sorry...I made it sound like my formula was in PG, but it is in fact in ethanol.

    I was just referring to the raspberry ketone... BUT..my formula did have quite a bit of it, so theres definitely a considerable amount of PG floating around...Thanks for your advice..Ill try to use the raspberry ketone in much lower amounts as to not deaden things.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    To all good advices I can add some more. Sometimes methyl salicylate or wintergreen can work as "lifting" materials. I mention this because maybe you confuses with benzyl salicylate, which work more like blender.
    Various mints and peppermint, in traces, until you can't detect them by smell, can help too. Peppers - black or pink, in low amounts; eugenol and company; terpineol. ISO E super and Timbersilk - with even more power.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by Ramute View Post
    To all good advices I can add some more. Sometimes methyl salicylate or wintergreen can work as "lifting" materials. I mention this because maybe you confuses with benzyl salicylate, which work more like blender.
    Various mints and peppermint, in traces, until you can't detect them by smell, can help too. Peppers - black or pink, in low amounts; eugenol and company; terpineol. ISO E super and Timbersilk - with even more power.
    Gotcha, well now that I know benzyl salicylate is mostly used as a blender, I will change how I use it. I do have some mints that I can try this out with.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    See "final touch" on this page for some thoughts:
    https://sites.google.com/site/perfum...perfume-making

    Your'e welcome to visit my formulation blog, with a dozen of perfume formulations and accords to share!

  13. #13

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by jsparla View Post
    See "final touch" on this page for some thoughts:
    https://sites.google.com/site/perfum...perfume-making
    When I first experienced ambergris I thought of it as adding sparkle but I didn't know
    if it was the right word. Later after reading articles and books I noticed the word sparkle
    came up a few times. So it's nice to take note of your list with other sparkle adding materials.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    well...to be quite honest, I have never smelled ambergris in its "pure" form.....quite possibly, ive never even smelled it in a fragrance, for I have not smelled many older classic fragrances.

    What I have smelled: Ambroxan, AmbroxDL, Grisalva.

    To me, none of these have a sparkling note to them, but rather, they all seem kind of soft and musky, with ambroxan maybe on the metallic side?

    is ambergris much different from these 3?

  15. #15

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    By the way, I think one of the best examples of a tingling/sparkling fragrance, is the original Polo made by carlos benaim. WOW. that cologne has sparkle all the way through the dry down. not sure what is in it, but its a powerhouse.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by Macaul View Post
    well...to be quite honest, I have never smelled ambergris in its "pure" form.....quite possibly, ive never even smelled it in a fragrance, for I have not smelled many older classic fragrances.

    What I have smelled: Ambroxan, AmbroxDL, Grisalva.

    To me, none of these have a sparkling note to them, but rather, they all seem kind of soft and musky, with ambroxan maybe on the metallic side?

    is ambergris much different from these 3?
    What I'm referring to is not a note but an effect on the fragrance: like you described
    as a feeling rather than a note in your original question (and it does make sense)
    I haven't had the four to compare, but at low levels you can get the effect without
    an obvious note standing out.
    Last edited by Odeon; 13th June 2014 at 12:34 AM.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    I know you've asked for aromachemical suggestions but I've found that Cinnamon Bark at 10% dilution is great for lifting a blend.

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  18. #18

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by Niche1 View Post
    I know you've asked for aromachemical suggestions but I've found that Cinnamon Bark at 10% dilution is great for lifting a blend.

    Sent from my RM-821_apac_australia_new_zealand_218 using Tapatalk
    If it matters, that will almost certainly put you outside the IFRA standards however: cinnamon bark is virtually impossible to use in anything with skin contact without falling foul of the standards due to the cinnamic aldehyde content, which is typically three quarters of the oil and heavily restricted.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    If it matters, that will almost certainly put you outside the IFRA standards however: cinnamon bark is virtually impossible to use in anything with skin contact without falling foul of the standards due to the cinnamic aldehyde content, which is typically three quarters of the oil and heavily restricted.
    Ah, thank you for this note. that helps. and Niche1, I appreciate your contribution!

  20. #20

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Thanks Macaul, sorry I didn't consider IFRA standards - I only make perfume for myself.
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  21. #21

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    If it matters, that will almost certainly put you outside the IFRA standards however: cinnamon bark is virtually impossible to use in anything with skin contact without falling foul of the standards due to the cinnamic aldehyde content, which is typically three quarters of the oil and heavily restricted.
    Chris, I'm American so I don't always have to care, but what I'm planning to do is have an international, IFRA-compliant version of the scent I'm working on, which does contain cinnamon bark at half a percent or so, and a few other resticted things. Is there a no-brainer as to what to replace that classic cinnamon smell with? In the past I used the leaf instead of the bark, but I do think the bark is maybe more of a true cinnamon smell. So far I haven't seen a definitive answer for the "best" IFRA-compliant cinnamon note.
    Last edited by DrSmellThis; 14th June 2014 at 05:15 AM.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Cinnamon Bark contains a huge amount of Cinnamic Aldehyde, the chemical that is responsible for the smell, and the chemical that is such a sensitiser. Cinnamon Leaf contains less Cinnamic Aldehyde, but a lot more Eugenol (smells of Clove), which is also restricted, but not as much. You could try using some Cinnamic Nitrile (Cinnamalva), which is also restricted (I think), but, again, by not as much.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post
    Cinnamon Bark contains a huge amount of Cinnamic Aldehyde, the chemical that is responsible for the smell, and the chemical that is such a sensitiser. Cinnamon Leaf contains less Cinnamic Aldehyde, but a lot more Eugenol (smells of Clove), which is also restricted, but not as much. You could try using some Cinnamic Nitrile (Cinnamalva), which is also restricted (I think), but, again, by not as much.
    Thanks, David. I made a note to that effect.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by DrSmellThis View Post
    Chris, I'm American so I don't always have to care, but what I'm planning to do is have an international, IFRA-compliant version of the scent I'm working on, which does contain cinnamon bark at half a percent or so, and a few other resticted things. Is there a no-brainer as to what to replace that classic cinnamon smell with? In the past I used the leaf instead of the bark, but I do think the bark is maybe more of a true cinnamon smell. So far I haven't seen a definitive answer for the "best" IFRA-compliant cinnamon note.
    It's difficult: you can use a small amount of cinnamon leaf, bark or aldehyde, supplement with the nitrile David describes (IFRA limit 0.1% ish) and with alpha-methyl cinnamaldehyde (IFRA limit 1.6% ish). For the rest you could look at somewhat spicy elements like safraleine and cashmeran, perhaps supported by caryophyllene, Schinus molle and so on.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Notes that have a sparkling/tingling effect

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    It's difficult: you can use a small amount of cinnamon leaf, bark or aldehyde, supplement with the nitrile David describes (IFRA limit 0.1% ish) and with alpha-methyl cinnamaldehyde (IFRA limit 1.6% ish). For the rest you could look at somewhat spicy elements like safraleine and cashmeran, perhaps supported by caryophyllene, Schinus molle and so on.
    Interesting pink pepper idea. (Cinnamon seems almost hot red pepper plus a sugary, fruity-boozy element, and a woody aromatic resinous element) All seem worth a try.

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