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  1. #1
    Dependent pluran's Avatar
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    Default Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    "......This is a masculine fragrance, of course, and it comes in a beautiful black bottle that looks like the cap of a titanic fountain pen. On a guy, it would probably be a little too Porsche Design “black-is-the-new-black” for my taste. But it will work great on a woman, as a chaser for the nauseating meringues everyone else is doing, and to advertise an unrepentantly dry-eyed disposition......"

    http://arabia.style.com/beauty/beaut...lanc-emblem/#5

    d Obhttp://arabia.style.com/beauty/beauty-guide/spring-summer-fragrances-2014-luca-turin-reviews-kenzo-couleur-kenzo-violet-and-mont-blanc-emblem/#5session. One of the world's most revered perfume critics, Luca Turin is the winner of two Prix Jasmin, the highest honor for perfume writing in France. The reviews from Luca Turin's bi-monthly column, Message in a Bottle, will be featured in Luca Turin's and Tania Sanchez' forthcoming book of fragrance reviews.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Thanks for the info and link.
    Remember that while it is perfectly acceptable to criticize the content of a post - criticizing the poster is not.
    Mean spirited, nasty, snide, sarcastic, hateful, and rude individuals don't warrant or deserve other individuals' acknowledgement or respect.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    I must now smell the Kenzo. It sounds like a sister of the terrifying delice de cartier.

    Interesting how he hints his love for the marine fruit salad of Paradox blue may have been misplaced.

    cacio

  4. #4

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    I just don't find his reviews relevant or helpful. Alkynes (triple bonds) are the least stable, but sometimes are less reactive than alkenes (double bonds) when the two pi bonds delocalize and energy is reduced in the pi system. What does all this mean? He doesn't know his general audience with speak of chemical gibberish, which isn't relevant to letting us know how it smells in the general sense. He may be on a journey to know how an alkyne smells, but this is absurd considering polymers of varying lengths would come across differently.
    Last edited by Scentologist; 12th June 2014 at 06:29 AM.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  5. #5

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    English is not my mother-tongue and my studies in Chemistry are quite ancient- and was more in Inorganic Chemistry than in Organic, but I think all he says is: as alkynes are too reactive to be stable in a fragrance mix, they aren't used amymore.
    I also don't want this thread to slip again into a sterile discussion on LT, so I won't say more on the subject.
    Thanks pluran for the link :-)
    "Your fragrance with a fume of iodine" L. Cohen

  6. #6

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    I would love to discuss the fragrance from a olfactive point of view, but his review directed us in chemical discussion now didn't it. If I want to know how it smells, I don't want to read that water has a torsion angle of 104.5 degrees and reacts with electrons of the octet system lol. So I had to read reviews on fragrantica to get an actual mental picture of how this might be. Doesn't sound interesting.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  7. #7

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    4 stars for Emblem? Am I reading that correctly? Jesus, that stuff is dreadful.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    LT has his fan base, apparently, and sometimes his reviews are useful, but these reviews of his should be considered something unique, IMO. Perhaps his reviews might be best thought of as being a fan of a sports team that never has a winning season. LOL.

  9. #9
    Dependent pluran's Avatar
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    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by iodine View Post
    ...........I also don't want this thread to slip again into a sterile discussion on LT, so I won't say more on the subject. .........
    It always does. But it's amusing to read the responses. Amazing how the powerful envy clouds people's judgment. :-)

    The recent reviews appear to be written mainly for the editorial staff of Style.com/Arabia based upon their needs and wants. Ratings might be applied there as well. I'm sure Luca's saving his best reviews for his and Tania's new book.

    And I rarely see Luca get into "chemical discussions" about fragrances unless it's relevant. I love and agree with most of his reviews. Nothing else like them. But mainly I just love his writing which is on par with the best writers on the planet, as confirmed by the massive amount of high quality and positive editorial reviews on Perfumes: The A-Z Guide from many of the the best sources out there. A Godzilla accomplishment and huge success. It must feel great. I thank the universe that he'll still be around writing reviews.

    His twitter page is also superb. Check it out: https://twitter.com/lucaturin
    Last edited by pluran; 13th June 2014 at 12:45 AM.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Thanks for the link. I enjoyed the reviews.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Again, Luca Turin provides very interesting background information to perfumery that some, if not all, of us can appreciate.

    With reference to acetylenic molecules, I had always though Grey Flannel was more of a violet flower scent than violet leaf one, so this titbit surprised me. We learn something new everyday. It also goes to show how much we depend on descriptions of fragrances through 'notes' but have very little understanding and knowledge of the materials/ingredients/chemistry that underlie these notes.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    @Scentologist: You had me until "polymers" :-)
    Last edited by luca turin; 12th June 2014 at 11:04 PM.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by luca turin View Post
    @Scentologist: You had me until "polymers" :-)
    Dr. Turin called me out and I drew you out . How marvelous! I enjoy healthy discussion of chemistry. Often times its hard to tell someone's demeanor on the computer, so don't take my general thoughts to heart; I was confused about the fragrance review but as pluran mentioned, perhaps you do know your audience and was addressing the needs of a particular group. I'm not knocking your experience at all.

    Often times we get the impression that fragrance oils are just thrown into a bottle of perfumer's alcohol and call it a day. I have no experience making a fragrance or with the industry, so please indulge me. Would raw materials be triple distilled for high purity? More? Mechanisms can yield us an abundance synthetics, no problem. However, when considering the stability of compounds in solution, I'd like to think that there is an intelligent process. Colloidal electrolyte solutions form micelles such as detergents, but in fragrance, I'd like to think of this preparation as oil in water (O/W). The stability of these chemicals is something I would think about when considering the construction of a fragrance. In science we're taught "like always likes like" and so it would make sense that all the notes would be grouped according to their chemical profile, mixed accordingly, the combined with a stabilizer to hold them in place. Perhaps this isn't the actual case though. Low stability means that the chemical falls out of solution or is destroyed, not to be confused with saturation. Things like antioxidants can be added to negate reactions with oxygen as well as stabilizers to keep the ingredient from falling out of solution, thus creating a fragrance that has a longer shelf life and stays true to the scent. What would this mean in terms of artistry or modern perfumery? Perhaps some fragrances are designed from a chemically mechanistic stand point, but then again perhaps the cold press is still used. No idea. However, it would be fun to compare and contrast the technique between a few well known houses, to which I'm sure their process is secret.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  14. #14

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by pluran View Post

    And I rarely see Luca get into "chemical discussions" about fragrances unless it's relevant. I love and agree with most of his reviews. Nothing else like them. But mainly I just love his writing which is on par with the best writers on the planet, as confirmed by the massive amount of high quality and positive editorial reviews on Perfumes
    Quote Originally Posted by Maque View Post
    Again, Luca Turin provides very interesting background information to perfumery that some, if not all, of us can appreciate. (...)
    We learn something new everyday. It also goes to show how much we depend on descriptions of fragrances through 'notes' but have very little understanding and knowledge of the materials/ingredients/chemistry that underlie these notes.
    I know I promised I wouldn't have said more on the subject, but I'll just chime in to say how much I love the way LT uses Chemistry, along with other arts and sciences, as an endless source of powerful metaphors and brilliant pieces of narrative, in addition to giving "technical" information on molecules that hide in a perfume bottle.
    Last edited by iodine; 13th June 2014 at 08:30 AM.
    "Your fragrance with a fume of iodine" L. Cohen

  15. #15

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Hi there Scentologist. No offence taken! Purification of odorants is indeed mostly by distillation, all other methods being in general prohibitively expensive in comparison. Some solids are purified by crystallisation. Odorants vary a great deal in solubility in oil, with a logP [oil/water] that can go from <1 to >4. 98% ethanol seems to be a good universal solvent for almost all of these, though big'uns like musks have to be heated gently to get them to dissolve. Often other solvents are used, as in phthalates [now banned] or even hedione [currently cheap, low odor value, improves the fragrance anyway] In low-alcohol compositions one has to use a detergent to carry the fragrance. The alkynes with their triple C-C bond undergo all manner of reactions, photochemical, free radical and oxidation and seem mostly to be good allergens. Trouble is, nothing much smells like -C≡C- The key variables in composition are volatility and intensity, but aside from very technical soap perfumery where substantivity [stickiness to fabric] is a big deal, there is little actual chemical science involved in compositions. As long as you never mix aldehydes and amines to get dark Schiff bases you're mostly OK :-)
    Last edited by luca turin; 13th June 2014 at 02:13 PM.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Very interesting, thank you.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Luca, I don't know if you're familiar with Reddit, but they often have celebrities along with experts in all kinds of esoteric fields (astrophysicist, vacuum cleaner repair man, etc) who join so they can be asked questions by a very large group of participants, and I think you would be a perfect candidate for an AMA, i.e. "Ask Me Anything".

  18. #18

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    I seem to remember we tried that already and nobody turned up :-)

  19. #19

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by luca turin View Post
    I seem to remember we tried that already and nobody turned up :-)
    Really? Bummer. I did a search before I recommended this and didn't find anything, but the database is probably limited.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by HORNS View Post
    Really? Bummer. I did a search before I recommended this and didn't find anything, but the database is probably limited.
    I just checked my emails: a friend tried to set up an AMA on Reddit in Oct 2011 but there was no interest.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by luca turin View Post
    I just checked my emails: a friend tried to set up an AMA on Reddit in Oct 2011 but there was no interest.
    Well, of course it's grown since then, and I did a quick look on the web and didn't find any hard numbers or percentages, but I am to assume that over the past three or so years the growth has been huge (if it finally got around to me being interested), so it is something you and Tania may want to consider when you guys release your updated The Guide.

    Sorry for the tangent, folks!
    Last edited by HORNS; 15th June 2014 at 02:10 AM.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    My discussion would be as follows; Just tonight, I thought about your debate between shape and vibrational theories. I'd have to say that your argument against the traditional lock and key method is plausible, but there are also other considerations as to why we can perceive things similar and yet differently from other people or at various points in our own lives. In patients with major depressive disorders, they experience chemical imbalances and corrective drugs work to increase serotonin in the synapsis of neurons. Now, if low modulation of serotonin causes a condition, what about conditions that effect glutamine being released from the olfactory receptor of the neuron axon? Glutamine is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. If the inhibitory GABA blocks the influx of calcium, less glutamine would be released, thus the brain would not get such a clear interpretation of the signal? This is just an idea and to my knowledge, hasn't been discussed. Not sure. However, I feel that chemical imbalances can distort smell.
    Last edited by Scentologist; 15th June 2014 at 05:48 AM.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  23. #23

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    At the risk of going even deeper off-topic: Surely you mean glutamate and not glutamine, and how could it be "released from the olfactory receptor of the neuron axon" ? You clearly know some of the jargon of neuroscience, but you string it together in a way that makes no sense to a neuroscientist. As for the idea "not having been discussed", I cannot see how you can state that confidently given the vastness of the neuroscience literature. In a quick search on Google Scholar I found this http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...06452210007116 which suggests that there may be a connection between parosmia, or perhaps hyposmia, and depression. None of this, of course, has any bearing on whether smell works by shape or vibration.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    A lot of this thread should appear in Private Eye under 'Pseuds Corner'

    About as useful to me as, and I'm quoting Nietzsche here '... explaining the constituents of water to a drowning man ...'

    Basically , does it smell good, does it last, is it worth the asking price ???

  25. #25

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaern View Post
    A lot of this thread should appear in Private Eye under 'Pseuds Corner'

    About as useful to me as, and I'm quoting Nietzsche here '... explaining the constituents of water to a drowning man ...'

    Basically , does it smell good, does it last, is it worth the asking price ???
    Quoting Nietzsche, eh? :-)

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Now of course I want to smell Emblem, I haven't found a Montblanc scent I like yet. And I happen to like the daft bottle.

    ((waving to Luca))
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  27. #27

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by luca turin View Post
    At the risk of going even deeper off-topic: Surely you mean glutamate and not glutamine, and how could it be "released from the olfactory receptor of the neuron axon" ? You clearly know some of the jargon of neuroscience, but you string it together in a way that makes no sense to a neuroscientist. As for the idea "not having been discussed", I cannot see how you can state that confidently given the vastness of the neuroscience literature. In a quick search on Google Scholar I found this http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...06452210007116 which suggests that there may be a connection between parosmia, or perhaps hyposmia, and depression. None of this, of course, has any bearing on whether smell works by shape or vibration.
    Thanks Luca. Yes, I meant glutamate. Not sure if it were my spell correct or me being tired and typing fast lol. Thanks so much for pointing that out. As I said, NOT SURE if its been discussed. I don't read medical or science literature as related to fragrances. I was just tossing out ideas. Sometimes things are discovered by the start of a simple discussion. I could be completely wrong in anything I think about how it all relates to smell, but its fun to suggest and explore possibilities. I was once narrow-minded about the whole vibrational theory, and that was my mistake. Vibrations have a role in a molecule's ability to contort and bind to receptors. Does the vibration have something to do with smell or simply allow for a particular arrangement to bind with specificity to a receptor; all good questions and I hope your work can further distinguish the difference and validate it. I have taken my own advice and opened up to your possibility In any case, I'm really grateful for your love of fragrances and passion to pursue it on an academic level. Its a worthwhile endeavor as little is known about it.
    Last edited by Scentologist; 16th June 2014 at 10:29 PM.
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  28. #28
    Dependent OctaVariuM's Avatar
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    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    I don't know what any of these words mean, but I just want to be included in a thread with Luca in it.

    (To stay on topic: I want to check out the new Kenzo. I've been impressed by what I've smelled in my limited experience at a few Sephoras)
    Fragrance blog being actively updated weekly (hopefully)!: http://moteperfumery.blogspot.com/

    Check out a fun little thread I made if you don't know what to wear today: http://www.basenotes.net/threads/384264-Pick-another-member-s-SOTD-(Game)

  29. #29

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Octvarium, I agree. I'm a fan of mont blanc pens and their earlier fragrances. If I get a chance to sniff Emblem, I will, but haven't seen it. I can follow Luca on a certain level, but I can't follow him in terms of his vast experience with raw materials in fragrance and their chemical structure. Its nice that he can relate a particular smell to a structure; sort of how I relate ether to being sweet, but what I don't know is what part of the structure is responsible for the odor. I've always been concerned with Structure/Function. In any case, to know what he is talking about, you've got to pay your dues. Luckily my how adult career has been steeped in science and medicine, so I get it, but agree its not for everyone. Wished I had more time to chase it as related to fragrances. His work might change the way synthetics are derived or how materials are paired in perfumery. Who knows, but exciting to think about.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  30. #30

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    One thing that has not been addressed here is how sensitivities can change, so perhaps one day LT will smell Emblem and say to himself, "I thought that violet leaf quality was stronger." This has been my experience and is consistent with the scientific evidence I have seen. LT seems to think there is some sort of "objective" perception of a scent, whereas it seems much more likely that a note/accord (or aroma chemical) can "spike out" on a particular wearing (especially if one has never smelled it before), or that one's overall sensitivity can be lower or higher than usual. He may be "good with chemistry" but seems to selling the psychological element short !

  31. #31

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigsly View Post
    One thing that has not been addressed here is how sensitivities can change, so perhaps one day LT will smell Emblem and say to himself, "I thought that violet leaf quality was stronger." This has been my experience and is consistent with the scientific evidence I have seen. LT seems to think there is some sort of "objective" perception of a scent, whereas it seems much more likely that a note/accord (or aroma chemical) can "spike out" on a particular wearing (especially if one has never smelled it before), or that one's overall sensitivity can be lower or higher than usual. He may be "good with chemistry" but seems to selling the psychological element short !
    It may not have been addressed here, but the idea of individual sensitivity to a specific odorant and different degrees of perception of it according to certain variable parameters are widely explored in scientific literature on the subject and I don't believe LT have ever denied it, at least I don't recall having read it in his books....
    Last edited by iodine; 17th June 2014 at 08:43 AM.
    "Your fragrance with a fume of iodine" L. Cohen

  32. #32

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by iodine View Post
    It may not have been addressed here, but the idea of individual sensitivity to a specific odorant and different degrees of perception of it according to certain variable parameters are widely explored in scientific literature on the subject and I don't believe LT have ever denied it, at least I don't recall having read it in his books....
    Not denying something doesn't even mean the person is aware of it! If you write a book called "Perfumes: The Guide," and don't explicitly state that sensitivities/perceptions can vary, you clearly are not placing much importance on it. LOL.

    Moreover, LT has acknowledged that with some scents he reviewed there wasn't what one would call a great deal of study, let alone a second wearing. And while it may be the case that LT is one of the few people who has a more or less entirely consistent perception of these complex concoctions, that isn't likely to be helpful to most of his readers, I'd guess. I don't mind if people disagree, but I would like them to weigh in so that we know where they stand, and some rationale for their positions would be nice as well.
    Last edited by Bigsly; 18th June 2014 at 09:08 AM.

  33. #33

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Why don't you just write your own book, Bigsly?
    “Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.'”
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  34. #34

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. reasonable View Post
    Why don't you just write your own book, Bigsly?
    My blog is now longer than a book! LOL.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigsly View Post
    Not denying something doesn't even mean the person is aware of it! If you write a book called "Perfumes: The Guide," and don't explicitly state that sensitivities/perceptions can vary, you clearly are not placing much importance on it. LOL.

    Moreover, LT has acknowledged that with some scents he reviewed there wasn't what one would call a great deal of study, let alone a second wearing. And while it may be the case that LT is one of the few people who has a more or less entirely consistent perception of these complex concoctions, that isn't likely to be helpful to most of his readers, I'd guess. I don't mind if people disagree, but I would like them to weigh in so that we know where they stand, and some rationale for their positions would be nice as well.
    I don't think that's the thread topic.
    Last edited by lpp; 18th June 2014 at 09:37 AM.
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  36. #36
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    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by JiveHippo View Post
    4 stars for Emblem? Am I reading that correctly? Jesus, that stuff is dreadful.
    Good to know. I like violet leaf, generally. But not the wretched sort.

  37. #37

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by Bigsly View Post
    Not denying something doesn't even mean the person is aware of it! If you write a book called "Perfumes: The Guide," and don't explicitly state that sensitivities/perceptions can vary, you clearly are not placing much importance on it. LOL.

    Moreover, LT has acknowledged that with some scents he reviewed there wasn't what one would call a great deal of study, let alone a second wearing. And while it may be the case that LT is one of the few people who has a more or less entirely consistent perception of these complex concoctions, that isn't likely to be helpful to most of his readers, I'd guess. I don't mind if people disagree, but I would like them to weigh in so that we know where they stand, and some rationale for their positions would be nice as well.
    With some 1400 perfumes being released a year, I wonder how anyone can wear a perfume long enough (one week each, say?) before writing an in-depth review you find satisfying enough for everyone and still make it in time for a book that consistently presents the perceptions of a reviewer.

    So, Bigsly, if you release a book with 1000 perfume reviews with that sort of depth and consideration for all readers, perhaps, we will get to see that in, 20 years?

    As an aside, I wonder how many blogs even list 1000 perfume reviews.

  38. #38

    Default Re: Luca Turin Reviews Montblanc Emblem and Coleur Kenzo Violet at Style.com/Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by Maque View Post
    With some 1400 perfumes being released a year, I wonder how anyone can wear a perfume long enough (one week each, say?) before writing an in-depth review you find satisfying enough for everyone and still make it in time for a book that consistently presents the perceptions of a reviewer.

    So, Bigsly, if you release a book with 1000 perfume reviews with that sort of depth and consideration for all readers, perhaps, we will get to see that in, 20 years?

    As an aside, I wonder how many blogs even list 1000 perfume reviews.
    Good point, and my response is "quality over quantity," at least in this context. That is, if I wrote a book, I would discuss the various "prototype" scents that have been marketed, an obvious one being Cool Water. However, there is plenty of that kind of information already on my blog!

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