Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 14 of 14
o
  1. #1

    Default Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Hi! I am just starting to investigate the world of fragrance.

    I have no idea how to identify notes or how they smell like (I mean, I see the descriptions and most fragrance note names do not ring a bell), so my first question is what advice do you have for me to train my nose (in a possibly unexpensive way).

    I also have three specific questions:

    1) Is there any tutorial/post detailing what functionalities are available here in basenotes? (I mean, like a list of perfumes I own and my opinion, a suggestion list or other things)

    2) Are personal use fragrance oils included here as well?

    3) In the early 2000s I hated when the girls at shopping centers would give me those paper perfume sprayed samples. They all had a fragrance note in common which I hated (I used to say they all smelled the same), something volatile which turned my stomach. It's something that was not present in the few perfumes I smelled in the 80s, even the cheap dr0gstore ones, started to be present in some fragrances in the 90s, but not all, and was almost everywhere in the 2000s, even in more expensive fragrances. From what I have smelled in shopping centers in this decade of 2010, it's still very common but I seem to be finding a couple of fragrances which does not have it again, thankfully. I know I am not giving much information to go on, but can somebody help me?

    Thanks!


    (so it seems the spam message was due to the word dr0gstore... Is there a list of words to avoid?)
    Last edited by theUntrainedNose; 2nd August 2014 at 11:48 AM. Reason: Adding content piece by piece as I have no idea what was causing the spam message

  2. #2

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    I think but this is only my opinion people should smell all sorts of things items to see what it smells like, plants/herbs/woods from a garden, spices herbs from the kitchen, basically anything that smells of something. Next you do not mention much about yourself but everyone has for instance flowers they like to smell or not. Some people like more floral smells some like more spicy things. The way something smells in a bottle or on a paperstrip is not the way it smells on ones skin or even in a certain season etc. A way to try scents and not spend a fortune on fullsize bottles is to buy samples. I like buying sets of samples straight from the perfume houses. Price is not all. You have to like a fragrance yourself. I am older person 54 and my tastes and scent nose and even smelling things items perfumes have changed over the years. Menopause also wreaks havoc for some of us ladies as those of you who know should know etc. Scent fragrance is a joy and a journey of discovery.
    [COLOR=""]a rose is a rose is a rose[/COLOR]

  3. #3
    hednic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Reside in McLean, Va., Manhattan NYC, Manuel Antonio Costa Rica & Búzios Brasil
    Posts
    307,662

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Welcome to you! As I am sure others would say, by sampling as much as you can with what's out there will help you to familiarize your nose and yourself with the different smells.
    Remember that while it is perfectly acceptable to criticize the content of a post - criticizing the poster is not.
    Mean spirited, nasty, snide, sarcastic, hateful, and rude individuals on Basenotes don't warrant or deserve my or other Basenoters' acknowledgement or respect.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Thanks for the replies!

    Quote Originally Posted by BelleBeryl View Post
    A way to try scents and not spend a fortune on fullsize bottles is to buy samples. I like buying sets of samples straight from the perfume houses.
    I have never seen those sets of samples for sale. That sounds like a good idea. I'll look for them online. Any advice on these sets?

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    22,060

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Advertised notes are often fantasy and do not correspond to the content.

    As belle was saying, many natural materials can be smelled at the source. Moreover, recently there are many stores that sell various oils, whatever the quality, they give a good idea about said material. Of course, many things are synthetic chemical that's more difficult to find in isolation in stores. What helps then, as said, is to smell many perfumes and find the common aspects. It's not just about notes or single materials, but probably more important is to identify the underlying structure, which is typically based on accords of materials, for instance, chypre, oriental, fougere, etc.

    I'm not sure what you are referring to in 3). there are a few materials and styles that came to the fore in the 90s-00s. Marine perfumes (based on calone or the like), but more likely woody-ambers (materials that smell quite sharp, almost like alcohol).

    cacio

  6. #6
    Dependent sdotlow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,234

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Quote Originally Posted by theUntrainedNose View Post
    Thanks for the replies!

    I have never seen those sets of samples for sale. That sounds like a good idea. I'll look for them online. Any advice on these sets?
    It depends on what houses you're interested in. Most designer stuff won't have sample packs. It's mostly (if not only) high end niche stuff that will have discovery sets / sample packs.

    Luckyscent.com has samples of pretty much everything, and has quite a few sample sets.

    If you have a particular fragrance house you are interested in, they'll usually sell sample sets directly from their website (amouage, and I believe MFK does as well).
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  7. #7

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Thanks for all the replies.

    I know I like some perfumes which are usually named as chypres (Niki de Saint Phalle is on my wishlist), but I do not know what the word means. I know I have smelled male and female perfumes advertised as chypres in the past and liked them, but unfortunately I've spent a long time away from perfumes and forgot.

    Orientals are those heady/incense-y/spicy smells, isn't it? I like some of them, though I am usually not brave enough to wear them.

    No idea what fougère is...

    About what I am referring to on (3), I am really sorry for not being able to explain better. I actually like the smell of alcohol. This smell is not completely dissimilar, but less clean and smells more like bug spray to me. I don't usually like fragrances advertised as marine, but I do own one fragrance that smells like the ocean and like it when I can wear it (Navegar by L'Artisan Parfumeur, sometimes my skin reacts really badly to it, though).

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    22,060

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Chypre is a specific accord of oakmoss, bergamot, and labdanum. the name (the Mediterranean island) comes from the first perfume to use this accord (Chypre by Coty, now sadly defunct). Unfortunately, oakmoss has been heavily restricted by the aromachemical firms association, so true chypres are rare today, though apparently some brands have managed to concoct an oakmoss substitute (eg Guerlain with Mitsouko, likely the most famous chypres).

    Orientals is a broad category, yes, typically they have a combination of spices, resins, ambers, and vanilla. Not all are heady, some are very smooth, like Guerlain Shalimar (more vanilla), others are indeed spicy and heady (eg Opium). Fougeres used to be the most common male fragrance type (before the advent of "sporty" stuff). They smell clean and "barbershoppy", often with lavender or other aromatic herbs at the top. Examples include Azzaro pour homme, paco rabanne ph, YSL Rive Gauche pour homme, etc.

    From your description, bug spray, it seems indeed that you are referring to some woody amber material (incidentally, these materials have no relation with woods or ambers, they're synthetics). Unfortunately, many modern masculine subscribe to the idea that a male perfume should smell like a hospital cleaner.

    cacio

  9. #9

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Yes, Shalimar! It is on my wishlist as well, just like Miss Dior (with the beautiful houndstooth bottle!). I hope the chypres I am wishing for are still available somewhere.

    I like the smell of natural amber, and the smell of wood, so I suppose woody amber is a material with a misleading name.

    I do not know much of masculine scents. I like Agua Brava from Puig and I like Old Spice (the original smell, not the weird named things they have been creating lately). I remember a colleague at high school (a girl!) wore something from Paco Rabanne which had a very unusual unisex smell. In my memory, the smell reminded me of dry metal (which has no scent) but in a good way.
    Last edited by theUntrainedNose; 2nd August 2014 at 06:27 PM. Reason: I confused Samsara with Shalimar as both are on my wish list

  10. #10
    Basenotes Junkie sunny82's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    508

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    I recently started researching scents, trying to "train my nose". I read Luca Turin and Tania Sanchez' book, "Perfumes, The Guide", and learned a LOT about fragrance. But who knows what "tomato stem" or Calone smells like unless you actually smell it? So, I have done a couple of things: 1. I've been ordering samples of fragrance in themes, i.e., a number of Chanels and Christian Dior. Or a series of vetiver scents. A couple of great sources for samples are Lucky Scents, The Posh Peasant, and Surrender to Chance. Reasonable prices. I've also searched out vintage fragrances and new reformulations on ebay. I even got a vintage sampler that was extremely reasonable.
    Also, I've ordered some fragrance molecules from Perfumers Apprentice, and some essential oils online. (I admit, I'm a bit obsessed.)
    Finally, there are a ton of fragrance blogs from which I've learned so much. But there is no substitute for the real thing: your nose.
    “Let the beauty we love, be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.” -Rumi

  11. #11
    Basenotes Junkie sunny82's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    508

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    And there is a scent called Metal by Paco Rabanne. So you nailed that one.
    Have fun!
    “Let the beauty we love, be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.” -Rumi

  12. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    22,060

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Metal by Paco Rabanne is one of my favorites. It smells very green up top, then it becomes somewhat more abstract and slightly oily. I think it has been discontinued, but it can still be found relatively inexpensively on ebay.

    cacio

  13. #13

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Quote Originally Posted by theUntrainedNose View Post
    Yes, Shalimar! It is on my wishlist as well, just like Miss Dior (with the beautiful houndstooth bottle!). I hope the chypres I am wishing for are still available somewhere.

    I like the smell of natural amber, and the smell of wood, so I suppose woody amber is a material with a misleading name.

    I do not know much of masculine scents. I like Agua Brava from Puig and I like Old Spice (the original smell, not the weird named things they have been creating lately). I remember a colleague at high school (a girl!) wore something from Paco Rabanne which had a very unusual unisex smell. In my memory, the smell reminded me of dry metal (which has no scent) but in a good way.
    Be careful if you smell "Miss Dior". The fragrance being sold by that name is NOT the original, wonderful Chypre. For some unknown reason, the original fragrance was replaced by Miss Dior Cherie(?). I think the original is still being sold (or a pale reformulated version of it) under a different name.

  14. #14
    Basenotes Junkie sunny82's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    508

    Default Re: Hello, advice to train nose plus three specific questions

    Get vintage Dior fragrances if you can. They are world's apart from the new.
    “Let the beauty we love, be what we do. There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.” -Rumi




Similar Threads

  1. What is the best way to 'train' your nose?
    By yarn in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 9th February 2014, 05:44 PM
  2. Wanting to train my nose to pick up certain scents.
    By gmm150 in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 25th March 2012, 11:20 PM
  3. Where to train my nose? Where to smell individual ingredients?
    By G Man in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 30th May 2010, 03:34 PM
  4. how to train the nose...?
    By timaru in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11th September 2008, 03:37 PM
  5. How does one 'train' the nose?
    By Clemmie in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 30th March 2007, 04:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000