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  1. #1
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    Default Question For Clothes Sprayers

    I've been experiencing spraying my clothes exclusively and getting mix results. Can you make some suggestions on how to best experience a fragrance when spraying the clothes. So far, I've noticed very weak projection compared to skin. But I'm fine with that because I wear my fragrances primarily for self enjoyment. Anyway, thus far, here's my experience with clothes spraying...

    For me, I seem to get best results spraying around my shirt collar (on the outside) with my shirt removed. Basically, I put my shirt on a hanger, and then spray it 4-8 times around the collar and upper chest area. Then I let it dry for about 10 minutes before putting the shirt on. With this strategy, I don't seem to knock out my nose and I'm able to avoid olfactory fatigue. In contrast, if I was to spray my shirt collar while wearing my shirt, it often overwhelms my nose, and olfactory fatigue seems to kick in. In fact, I've always had a sensitive nose and any sprays on front of neck area is sure to give me olfactory fatigue.

    With me, the scent still develops on the clothes, It just takes a lot longer. I no longer believe a scent needs to be on the skin to fully develop. In my experience that is not true. It still develops on clothes, just slower. The common claims that a fragrances "has to mix with your skin chemistry" to fully develop is not the case with me, Fragrances to me smell the same on everybody... unless of course the person is dirty, sweaty or has a skin issue or something. Diet plays a role, but nothing that extreme. Unless you're eating abnormal amounts of garlic or other spicy food.

    I also noticed I can spray my clothes with 8 sprays of a fairly strong fragrance and the projection is still close to body, Again, not a bad thing for me. But I just wish I could create that scent bubble so I can smell my fragrances longer within my personal space. And that has been my dilemma. Does anybody know where to spray the clothes for better longevity. Obviously it lasts long if I sniff my shirt up close to my nose. But I want to be able to get whiffs throughout the day without smelling my shirt up close. Sometimes I can ruffle my shirt to get some "forced sillage" in which I can smell. But even that I get mixed results. Maybe I need more sprays. After all, projection is extremely low on clothes from my experience.

    BTW I've done several tests in which I sprayed a shirt 4-6 times and left the shirt in a room with the door closed. About an hour or so later I entered the room and could not smell the fragrance unless I literally smelled the shirt just a few inches from my nose.

    Any tips for spraying clothes and getting the best possible sillage at least enough to reach my nose.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    I think it is a question of body heat needed to spread the volatile molecules in the order intended. Top notes first etc Body heat.

    I wear an undershirt and spray the fragrance on it, on the chest area. It warms up. I can in my environment working at home open up my shirt or wear it fully buttoned and modulate the dispersion of the fragrance.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    This is an interesting post and thread, Rich. And I'm glad you made it, as I see extremely little, here or elsewhere, ever discussed regarding the spraying of fragrances on clothing rather than, or in addition to, on the skin.

    Maybe my skin chemistry is unusual, but my skin often seems to "eat" fragrances in a small fraction of the time that they will last on my clothing, or else alter them in unexpected and unpleasant ways. What I have worn most often in the way of fragrances, in fact, has been (real) sandalwood oil, sometimes with a small proportion of some other EO added to it, such as olibanum. But on my skin, Sandalwood EO will only last a couple of hours at best, with very little projection, and eventually morphs into a vaguely sour aroma in the drydown. But both the projection and the longevity are enhanced by a factor of at least five when I mix it with some alcohol and spray it onto my clothing instead. The drydown on my clothing is much nicer, too --- maybe the best part of the whole experience. Even then, it will certainly not fill a room or knock anyone over, but that is not the effect that I am going for anyway.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by thrilledchilled View Post
    I think it is a question of body heat needed to spread the volatile molecules in the order intended. Top notes first etc Body heat.

    I wear an undershirt and spray the fragrance on it, on the chest area. It warms up. I can in my environment working at home open up my shirt or wear it fully buttoned and modulate the dispersion of the fragrance.
    I see so spraying the inside of the under shirt? I'll give that a try - thanks!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by akguy View Post
    This is an interesting post and thread, Rich. And I'm glad you made it, as I see extremely little, here or elsewhere, ever discussed regarding the spraying of fragrances on clothing rather than, or in addition to, on the skin.

    Maybe my skin chemistry is unusual, but my skin often seems to "eat" fragrances in a small fraction of the time that they will last on my clothing, or else alter them in unexpected and unpleasant ways. What I have worn most often in the way of fragrances, in fact, has been (real) sandalwood oil, sometimes with a small proportion of some other EO added to it, such as olibanum. But on my skin, Sandalwood EO will only last a couple of hours at best, with very little projection, but bot the projection and the longevity are enhanced by a factor of at least five when I mix it with some alcohol and spray it onto my clothing instead. Even then, it will certainly not fill a room or knock anyone over, but that is not the effect that I am going for anyway.
    Interesting take AK Guy. I'm really enjoying the clothes spraying. I like to wear fragrances daily, sometimes 2-3 different fragrances so spraying the skin just cannot be that good for me. That's a lot of chemicals my skin has to take and it just can't be good. So that's another reason why I'm preferring clothes lately. If I can figure out a way to get better sillage (within my own personal space) by spraying my shirt, then I'd be very happy. Probably the best tip I can give spray the shit when it's off of you and let it dry before putting it on. I think your skin eating fragrances may also be because you are getting olfactory fatigue to some degree. All I know is I will never go back to skin spraying on a regular basis. Only shirt from here on forward. Do what works best for you. Just remember, no matter how great you smell, health is more important. That's not to say spraying the skin has any dangers. I don't believe there's enough evidence either way. So why take the chance.

  6. #6

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Like you, I also like applying to clothes, and most times the odor profile between skin and clothes is not too dissimilar (apart from timing and duration).

    If you've tested now in the dry, cold winter weather, note that this could change when it's warmer. As thrilled was saying, heat increases evaporation, and clothes will be warmer in the summer. Humidity also increases perception, so the dry air in a heated room is not good.

    I wear suits and the two places I enjoy spraying are either a handkerchief (or paperstrips) in the breast pocket, or the armpit area. Neither system creates a bubble, but you get whiffs as you move, eg when you open the jacket. Also, the armpit area being warmer than other parts, you have greater projection if you are wearing a shirt only.

    I have not experimented with pants much, but that's also something I hear about. The advantage there is that it is not close to the nose, so one doesn't get olfactory fatigue.

    As men, regrettably we cannot use the old method of a cotton ball in the cleavage.

    cacio

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Ever noticed that whenever you smell something the scent seems to disappear within minutes? Even that freshly brewed still-steaming cup of coffee in front of you seems to lose its aroma rather quickly? Or a signature-scent you encounter at a hotel lobby fades within minutes. Do you believe the hotel turns off the scent diffusing machine as soon as you arrive? Obviously not. How do you then explain the scent’s ‘disappearance’?

    This phenomenon is ‘scent habituation’ or popularly known albeit less accurately described as ‘olfactory fatigue’. Your nose never switches off, it’s just that your primitive brain tunes off that particular scent in order to scan for other odors that could signal an impending threat to your survival. This is probably what kept our species alive long before we learnt to manipulate fire.

    I’m pretty sure other people can still smell your fragrance when they are close enough within your scented sphere. But let them hang around you a little longer and the same phenomenon will affect them as it did you. Your scent will ‘disappear’. You need to actively seek out your fragrance to know if it is still on you /your clothes.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post

    As men, regrettably we cannot use the old method of a cotton ball in the cleavage.

    cacio
    Nowadays, sadly, that is true of fewer and fewer men (particularly as they get older).

  9. #9

    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondflame View Post
    I’m pretty sure other people can still smell your fragrance when they are close enough within your scented sphere. But let them hang around you a little longer and the same phenomenon will affect them as it did you. Your scent will ‘disappear’. You need to actively seek out your fragrance to know if it is still on you /your clothes.
    Too bad your theory doesn't work in the case of body odor.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post
    Like you, I also like applying to clothes, and most times the odor profile between skin and clothes is not too dissimilar (apart from timing and duration).

    If you've tested now in the dry, cold winter weather, note that this could change when it's warmer. As thrilled was saying, heat increases evaporation, and clothes will be warmer in the summer. Humidity also increases perception, so the dry air in a heated room is not good.

    I wear suits and the two places I enjoy spraying are either a handkerchief (or paperstrips) in the breast pocket, or the armpit area. Neither system creates a bubble, but you get whiffs as you move, eg when you open the jacket. Also, the armpit area being warmer than other parts, you have greater projection if you are wearing a shirt only.

    I have not experimented with pants much, but that's also something I hear about. The advantage there is that it is not close to the nose, so one doesn't get olfactory fatigue.

    As men, regrettably we cannot use the old method of a cotton ball in the cleavage.

    cacio
    Awesome suggestions! Especially spraying the armpit area (clothes) because that is one of the warmest parts of the body.

    BTW I'm glad someone else agrees the odor profile is not much different whether one sprays the clothes or skin. I always rejected the whole idea of fragances smelling different based on a person's skin chemistry. In fact, it's kind of silly. Of course, excluding skin that is dirty, sweaty, medical issue, diet, etc. Other than that, fragrances smell about the same on clothes as it does on skin on just about everybody. It's our nose (brain) that makes a person smell things differently. Not our skin, in general.

    Thanks again for the tips!

    Right now I just tested spraying the inside of my under shirt and so far it's working well. It allows me to get the benefits of body heat which helps with projection within my personal space. In fact, by spraying the inside of the shirt it seems to trap the scent better. Now when I want a whiff I simply ruffle my shirt so the scent carries up to my nose. This didn't work well when I sprayed the outside of my shirt. The scent seemed to escape too quickly even if I ruffled my shirt. Spraying the inside of my undershirt is definitely the way to go. And it controls the projection better which is what I want.

    Better yet, when I want to wear a new scent, I can simply change under shirts. Heck, like most people, I have a lot of under shirts and t-shirts. So that's not an issue at all. And less worries about possible stains. After all staining a undershirt is no big deal. I'm sure in the warmer weather when I wear just a t-shirt I'll need to spray less using this method.

    In all all, I'm liberated fellas. No more skin spraying for me. Except on rare occasions such as play time with the wife.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by akguy View Post
    Too bad your theory doesn't work in the case of body odor.
    Yikes!!

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by akguy View Post
    Too bad your theory doesn't work in the case of body odor.
    LOL, hey you know what? I have actually thought about this exact same scenario and could only conclude one thing: BO is considered a ‘threat’ so your brain won’t tune it out. Same goes with most unpleasant odors.

    And btw it’s not MY theory. Go dig it up.

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    I think it’s healthier not to spray on skin. Another good reason

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondflame View Post
    LOL, hey you know what? I have actually thought about this exact same scenario and could only conclude one thing: BO is considered a ‘threat’ so your brain won’t tune it out. Same goes with most unpleasant odors.

    And btw it’s not MY theory. Go dig it up.
    Well, I know that some people's BO is a definite threat, to my olfactory system if not to my very well being!

    That is another interesting theory, though, and would help explain why we cannot "tune out" certain offensive odors, such as those of feces or rotting flesh (although I've always thought it bizarre that dogs are ATTRACTED to those very same kinds of odors --- like a dog I met once who was repeatedly compelled to roll in the rotting carcass of a sea lion).

    As for the more general theory of smell, I have indeed read of that before, and realized that it does not originate with you. Nor was I trying to contradict or mock you in any way, but was merely trying to interject a bit of levity into the discussion.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by thrilledchilled View Post
    I think it’s healthier not to spray on skin. Another good reason
    It would certainly avoid, or at least drastically curtail, any possible allergic reactions or dermal sensitization from aroma chemicals. Which should (theoretically, at least) please the IFRA.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    I have been doing 4 sprays directly on skin for testing new stuff. One on my chest, back of neck, and inside each elbow. Coincidentally though, earlier this week I began spraying my sleeves next to the cuff, instead of my arms and I have been delighted with the results. Fragrances I like (Burberry London especially) that my skin eats away quickly have responded very well to this method. I work in a cubicle, so when I need a nice whiff of what I am wearing, I can just casually wave my arm in front of my face without my co-workers looking at me weird for sniffing myself.

    I had actually read/saw the cuff spraying method being mentioned, so I thought I'd give it a go. I hadn't considered no skin sprays at all, but I think I'll try that as well. It sounds like a great idea IMO.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    I give one or two shots dead center of my chest, results have always been good.

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    rich

    glad you've found a method that seems to work well. I don't use undershirt, so that won't do for me.

    Do we know whether it is true that we do not get scent habituation to body odors? I'd think we do. it has happened to me before for instance to be in a cramped room, then go out and come back and notice that the room reeks of bodies. But perhaps that's true for not too strong odors. If somebody's really stinky, that could be a different story.

    cacio

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Any issues with fragrance lingering on the clothing? With some of my fragrances I have to use extreme caution so as to not let it get on fabric otherwise that fragrance will be present in the future, regardless of laundering. I wear a lot of different fragrances, from my collection and testing, and I do not want another fragrance clouding the experience of the one for that day.

    I'm not saying I never get fragrance on my clothing. It happens on purpose, and, even more so, accidentally. Some light fragrances, with low to midrange longevity, I intentionally allow to get on fabric. Just that I need to be mindful of some.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    I've actually been doing a bit more of the clothes spraying over the past few months, because, well:

    Maybe it's a coincidence, maybe not, but my face got drier and redder last year after I started wearing aftershave and fragrance for the first time in ages. I'm sure most of the reason for it was my age -- I'm in my late 40s -- and spending the past 15 years living in a coastal desert with poor-to-moderate air quality (LA). Plus it was February when I first started wearing cologne and aftershave again, and the air is generally drier in the Winter (unless it's raining of course).

    But I'm not sure that was all of it.

    Spraying a little alcohol on your skin on a daily basis can't be that bad for it, but it can't be good for it either, can it?

    Maybe I just need to put some weight back on...
    when I have a few extra pounds on, my face is fuller,
    and my skin seems more naturally "moisturized".

    I definitely notice fragrance lingers on my T-shirts for a while, sometimes just a few hours, sometimes a day or even longer.
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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by thrilledchilled View Post
    I think it is a question of body heat needed to spread the volatile molecules in the order intended. Top notes first etc Body heat.

    I wear an undershirt and spray the fragrance on it, on the chest area. It warms up. I can in my environment working at home open up my shirt or wear it fully buttoned and modulate the dispersion of the fragrance.
    I'm an undershirt sprayer as well. One shot to bare chest, a couple more on the undershirt, and I catch whiffs throughout the day without killing those around me.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Like yourself, I like to spray on my shirt collar.
    <div class="bnsotd"><b>Currently wearing:</b> <a href="ID26148387.html"><img src="http://www.basenotes.net/photos/products/33/26148387-7393.jpg"> Carven L'Eau Intense by Carven</a></div>

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Diddy

    regarding lingering, for stuff you wash like shirt, no problem. Of course for stuff one doesn't wash often, like suits or coats, it can linger a bit. Airing helps but a little bit remains.

    In the past, this effect (ie of perfume sticking to furs and coats after a while) was appreciated. Some perfumes even went for that, the so called parfums fourrure (perfumes furs).

    cacio

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post
    Diddy

    regarding lingering, for stuff you wash like shirt, no problem. Of course for stuff one doesn't wash often, like suits or coats, it can linger a bit. Airing helps but a little bit remains.

    In the past, this effect (ie of perfume sticking to furs and coats after a while) was appreciated. Some perfumes even went for that, the so called parfums fourrure (perfumes furs).

    cacio
    Thanks for the response!

    I will still remain cautious. I had a bad experience with something nuclear getting on a Hickey Freeman suit that just wouldn't go away, even with multiple professional cleanings. If it would've been something light like Santal by Fragonard or even lighter, it would've been no issue. I just have to be mindful, and especially while testing. Thanks again!

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    It does linger on the clothes even after the laundry. But I don’t find it Unpleasantly persistent. It’s still subtle and doesn’t cloud a new scent
    Last edited by thrilledchilled; 20th January 2019 at 12:03 AM.

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    I find spraying the inside of my shirt works well, the body heat amplifies the scent and it wafts up gently throughout the day.

  27. #27

    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    I've always been very prone to scent habituation. For example I could spray my arms/wrists with 10 sprays and a hour later only smell it when I put my nose to it and even then I feel like the scent has already faded. This doesn't really happen to many other smells. The problem is, sometimes I know it's not olfactory fatigue, because I will ask people close to me (family/friends), and they would say they hadn't smelled anything, even when wearing multiple sprays. Other times I am pretty sure it's fatigue, especially when the fragrance has ambroxan in it.

    For personal enjoyment, I get the best results with 1 or 2 sprays to the lower chest, under my clothes. For example, one spray on the skin and one on a undershirt. Doing that, I can get whiffs throughout the first few hours, which I wouldn't get spraying anywhere close to the face or arms/wrists.

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    I never spray skin. I think it’s safer for our health not to.

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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by Diddy View Post
    With some of my fragrances I have to use extreme caution so as to not let it get on fabric otherwise that fragrance will be present in the future, regardless of laundering.
    Same here.
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    Default Re: Question For Clothes Sprayers

    Quote Originally Posted by hednic View Post
    Same here.
    this is why I spray an undershirt or crummy t-shirt. Never anything that I'm wearing that faces the world.




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