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  1. #1

    Default Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    First and foremost, this is not an Aventus topic, just a reference to the fragrance. Second, I am not even a big fan of Aventus, but the impact it has made the the fragrance world is undeniable.

    When Aventus first came out, it was overlooked, or just not really praised. Now that it has established itself, it is regarded to as the best all around men's fragrance to many people. There is nobody on here who has never heard of it, and there are few people I know off here (non frag heads) who haven't heard of it. It has been copied so many times.

    I've been into fragrances now since the early 2000's, but really an advent collector and follower since joining Basenotes. In that time frame, I have never seen a more talked about fragrance than Aventus. Before that I have never seen a fragrance with such publicity, not even Acqua di Gio or Le Male, which were huge successes, and still are.

    So I think this question may be more for the older fellas. Could you remember any time back in the 70's, 80's, 90's where a fragrance had this much impact. Granted there were no internet forums, or communities like this, but I'm sure frags have always been loved and there have always been collectors. Was there a different "gold standard" back then? Not YOUR gold standard.. I mean.. was there another AVENTUS? As far as my time in frags goes, I have not seen anything like this before, and nothing yet after. I don't see anything ever replacing it, but every dog has its day.

    This topic was simply made out of curiosity. I am, and have always been astonished by the amount of talk on Aventus, that always seems to be unmatched. There have been a lot of "fads", but Aventus has been going strong now probably since 2011 or so, which is no fad to me.
    "I am not trendy" -Thierry Mugler
    Currently wearing: Wild Forest by Armand Basi

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Yes. Achieving a much bigger impact than Aventus which is still largely unknown outside of the frag bro community:
    Ralph Lauren Polo in the 80s and Armani Acqua Di Gio Pour Homme in the mid 90s to early 2000s.

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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    In the 60s, Eau Sauvage was the rage everywhere in France and all the men I'd come in contact with when living there seemed to be wearing it. By far the most popular men's fragrance being worn there at that time.
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Cool Water was all I heard about in junior high in the early 90's. Seems like every guy wore the stuff, and every girl loved it.

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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Fahrenheit i would think for sure.

    It (like Aventus) was a huge success and also had its haters.

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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Definitely Drakkar Noir (even more than Aventus), Aramis and Fahrenheit.
    Currently wearing: Lui by Mazzolari

  7. #7

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    To a certain extent and only if referring to BN in the early 2000s, other Creed masculines before the release of Aventus as well-just remembering what kind of an impact GIT, perhaps a bit less also MI had back then here on BN

  8. #8

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    I'll say one thing: don't mistake the microcosm that is Basenotes and similar fora / enthusiast outlets for the real world. Aventus is but a drop in the ocean compared to big sellers such as BdC, Sauvage, One Million more recently, or AdG and Cool Water around the turn of the century.

    I remember when Pure Malt was praised for being the best thing since sliced bread on this forum, but its influence was rather negligible in the long run. I think Aventus will fizzle out sooner or later when the next 'great thing' comes along. Such is the nature of things.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Definitely Cool Water and Fahrenheit, among others.
    Currently wearing: Habit Rouge by Guerlain

  10. #10
    The Devil in the Details
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    This is definitely a real "can of worms" question, but I'll give chase.

    Creed Aventus (2010) is probably the greatest 21st century Creed masculine thus far, has inspired countless lower-market clones because it exists in a price bracket that makes people detecting it on the wearer think that wearer is successful, and is the men's equivalent of a handbag at this point, giving cause for imitation just like said handbags. However, from an artistic and industry perspective, I don't think it has been half as impactful as fragrance hobbyists like to believe, unless the shallow, self-absorbed corporate ladder-climber "social Darwinist" type is the only segment anyone is trying to sell masculine fragrances to these days, and I don't think there are enough Patrick Batemans in the world to sustain a market of this size if that is so. The novel use of pineapple, white florals, ambergris, vetiver, and oakmoss has indeed created an accord unlike almost any other before it, but I don't think this is even the most influential Creed in the market, because Green Irish Tweed (1985) literally helped pave the way for one of the perfumers who worked on it (a then-uncredited Pierre Bourdon) to recycle GIT's primary accord into the world's first modern aquatic: Cool Water (1988). Without Green Irish Tweed, an entire genre that has become one of the most popular among men would not even exist.

    If we move past the scope of the ultra-luxe Creed, we'll see in a big-picture view that even though Green Irish Tweed was the genesis of a genre, little else from the house (including Aventus) has had anywhere near that kind of ripple-effect impact. Long before designers just consigned themselves to cranking out multitudes of variation on a single aromachemical theme to capture the biggest short-term profit yields, they actually tried competing to find the "next big thing", and the ones who landed on it were etched in stone as pioneers of the field. Thierry Mugler A*Men (1996) literally gave birth to the gourmand craze in men's fragrance, while Calvin Klein Eternity for Men (1989) was the first "Fresh Fougère" which set the pace for the next 15 or so years. Dior Fahrenheit (1988) was and still is such a bizzare abstract piece of work that people still turn heads and talk about it 30 years later. Hermes Bel Ami (1986) was a pinnacle in the leather chypre field, Kouros (1981) gave birth to the musky animalic fougère which dominated the 80's, while Ralph Lauren Polo (1977) gave birth to a dynasty of fragrance for the house on top of being the pinnacle of oakmoss usage. We can keep going back if we want, as Azzaro Pour Homme (1978) became a peak aromatic fougère, while Paco Rabanne Pour Homme (1973) pretty much invented the aromatic fougère style altogether. Aramis (1965) took a women's genre and made it for men when perfumer Bernard Chant subverted his formula for Gres Cabochard (1959) into Aramis,, while Faberge Brut (1963) made the barbershop scents of old feel sexier than they ever had by just adding a shot of greenery, feminine florals to the heart, and a cheesy medallion around the bottle's neck. Hell, Old Spice (1937) was a floundering women's oriental that became a happy accident success for men when it was shipped over to GIs in WWII (so they would stink less) and they came back home wanting more of the stuff.

    Then you have all the "first notable" stuff like the first notable use of calone (New West -1988), the first notable use of hedione (Eau Sauvage - 1966), the first notable use of Isobutyl quinoline (Knize Ten - 1924), the first notable chypre (Chypre de Coty 1917), the first abstract fragrance (Jicky - 1889), the first fougère and first notable use of coumarin (Fougère Royale 1882), the first notable eau de colognes (Farina and 4711, late 1700's).. on and on and so forth...


    ...which brings me to my point. Aventus is a good fragrance and an unlikely breakout success given its market position and price point, but that is more indicative of our economy, income inequality, and the extreme focus on self-image and materialism the folks who buy this kind of stuff have now versus where we were when all these other fragrances hit the market. Luxury is less luxurious now and more about symbolism than true indulgence or creature comfort, which is why the bold and decadent scents like Jicky, Kouros, Fahrenheit, or even stuff as recent as M7 will never be seen again outside of niche lines. Aventus might have had a huge financial impact on the house of Creed itself, and has become the closest thing to ubiquitous as a $500 fragrance can be, but I think the zeitgeist we see in the fragrance community is the true extent of any long-term influence it has had, since even stuff like Bleu de Chanel (2010) and Dior Sauvage (2015) has had more permanent long-term influence on the future of masculine perfume than Aventus.
    Last edited by Zealot Crusader; 21st January 2019 at 10:00 AM. Reason: I literally missed entire words.
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  11. #11

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    ...given its market position and price point, but that is more indicative of our economy, income inequality, and the extreme focus on self-image and materialism the folks who buy this kind of stuff have now versus where we were when all these other fragrances hit the market. Luxury is less luxurious now and more about symbolism than true indulgence or creature comfort, which is why the bold and decadent scents like Jicky, Kouros, Fahrenheit, or even stuff as recent as M7 will never be seen again outside of niche lines. Aventus might have had a huge financial impact on the house of Creed itself, and has become the closest thing to ubiquitous as a $500 can be, but I think the zeitgeist we see in the fragrance community is the true extent of any long-term influence it has had, since even stuff like Bleu de Chanel (2010) and Dior Sauvage (2015) has had more permanent long-term influence on the future of masculine perfume than Aventus.
    Completely agree. It’s a confluence of odd circumstances. I really enjoy Aventus but it’s sad to see some folks treating any kind of indulgence as more of a weird compulsion.
    Currently wearing: Aventus by Creed

  12. #12

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Sure there was, back in the day:
    Cool water
    ADG
    1 Million etc.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    During the time that I wasn't born I am sure there were a lot for example: Eau Sauvage, Pino Silvestre, Polo green, Brut .....

  14. #14

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Grey Flannel!

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Quote Originally Posted by hellbentforleather View Post
    Completely agree. It’s a confluence of odd circumstances. I really enjoy Aventus but it’s sad to see some folks treating any kind of indulgence as more of a weird compulsion.
    I think the bottom line for Aventus is it was the perfect storm of status symbol and agreeable generalist composition with just a few neat tweaks to the formula. Aventus became the new Acqua di Giò of top-earners, and thanks to the Internet, the new aspirational standard for guys buying into "bro culture" as doled out by online influencers.

    For as many bottles of Aventus as have been sold to $100k+ annual income guys in big money tech or finance hubs like Seattle, San Diego, Denver, Arlington, Austin, and New York City, the majority of guys seeing Jeremy Fragrance reviews and whatnot online are not them, and they subsist on gray market bottles or decants. But these guys are ironically creating more noise about the stuff in online communities than the dudes who "just buy it at Neiman's", because for them, it's a rite of passage to attain it, and this is before you even begin to unpack all the "GOAT batch" hysteria for who's the biggest, most-valid Aventus fan.

    I don't think other previously higher-end fragrances (i.e Hermès Bel Ami) ever developed this kind of cult because influencers, social media, and just the Internet at large didn't exist to tell them they "needed to have it" in order to be "on top of their game", and I'm sure in the case of most things regardless of brand value, even up until the mid 2000's, advertising and word of mouth was all the majority of guys paid attention to concerning what was or wasn't appealing.

    Any cult status on most other male fragrances released before the advent of social media are usually just receiving hype from discontinuation way after-the-fact from nostalgic online reviewers or reaping the benefit from a slow, natural snowballing of interest that has taken longer than the 8-year rise Aventus has experienced thanks to it being born in the thick of "Facebook/Twitter/YouTube" culture.

    I'm also pretty sure Creed didn't even intend this weird social psychology experiment since the majority of guys placing Aventus on a pedestal are the kind of guys Creed would never have intended to target, as they've made it clear with their own limited marketing that they're after the captains of industry or whatnot. Furthermore, Creed likely didn't intend the kind of cultural impact Aventus is being charged with any more than they intended inspiring a new genre of fragrance with Green Irish Tweed.
    Last edited by Zealot Crusader; 21st January 2019 at 10:16 AM. Reason: Spelling errors are bound to happen past midnight
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  16. #16

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    I would say:

    Cool Water

    CK One

    Polo Ralph Lauren


    For me, personally, Aventus is one of the most amazing scents I've ever experienced, the accord is just so versatile and perfect, but I also agree that it has to do with status at the end of the day.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    I think the bottom line for Aventus..... lots of great stuff ....... more great stuff ...... even more great stuff from Zealot .....Green Irish Tweed.
    If anyone wanted ter find out some stuff, all they'd have ter do would be ter read Zealot's posts in this thread. That'd lead 'em right! That's all I'm sayin'.

    Your posts in this thread have been spot on!
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  18. #18

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Quote Originally Posted by Norstrøm View Post
    If anyone wanted ter find out some stuff, all they'd have ter do would be ter read Zealot's posts in this thread. That'd lead 'em right! That's all I'm sayin'.

    Your posts in this thread have been spot on!
    +1

  19. #19

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nastka View Post
    I'll say one thing: don't mistake the microcosm that is Basenotes and similar fora / enthusiast outlets for the real world. Aventus is but a drop in the ocean compared to big sellers such as BdC, Sauvage, One Million more recently, or AdG and Cool Water around the turn of the century.

    I remember when Pure Malt was praised for being the best thing since sliced bread on this forum, but its influence was rather negligible in the long run. I think Aventus will fizzle out sooner or later when the next 'great thing' comes along. Such is the nature of things.
    Agreed. Non of my friends and family have ever heard of Creed..

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    This is definitely a real "can of worms" question, but I'll give chase.

    Creed Aventus (2010) is probably the greatest 21st century Creed masculine thus far, has inspired countless lower-market clones because it exists in a price bracket that makes people detecting it on the wearer think that wearer is successful, and is the men's equivalent of a handbag at this point, giving cause for imitation just like said handbags. However, from an artistic and industry perspective, I don't think it has been half as impactful as fragrance hobbyists like to believe, unless the shallow, self-absorbed corporate ladder-climber "social Darwinist" type is the only segment anyone is trying to sell masculine fragrances to these days, and I don't think there are enough Patrick Batemans in the world to sustain a market of this size if that is so. The novel use of pineapple, white florals, ambergris, vetiver, and oakmoss has indeed created an accord unlike almost any other before it, but I don't think this is even the most influential Creed in the market, because Green Irish Tweed (1985) literally helped pave the way for one of the perfumers who worked on it (a then-uncredited Pierre Bourdon) to recycle GIT's primary accord into the world's first modern aquatic: Cool Water (1988). Without Green Irish Tweed, an entire genre that has become one of the most popular among men would not even exist.

    If we move past the scope of the ultra-luxe Creed, we'll see in a big-picture view that even though Green Irish Tweed was the genesis of a genre, little else from the house (including Aventus) has had anywhere near that kind of ripple-effect impact. Long before designers just consigned themselves to cranking out multitudes of variation on a single aromachemical theme to capture the biggest short-term profit yields, they actually tried competing to find the "next big thing", and the ones who landed on it were etched in stone as pioneers of the field. Thierry Mugler A*Men (1996) literally gave birth to the gourmand craze in men's fragrance, while Calvin Klein Eternity for Men (1989) was the first "Fresh Fougère" which set the pace for the next 15 or so years. Dior Fahrenheit (1988) was and still is such a bizzare abstract piece of work that people still turn heads and talk about it 30 years later. Hermes Bel Ami (1986) was a pinnacle in the leather chypre field, Kouros (1981) gave birth to the musky animalic fougère which dominated the 80's, while Ralph Lauren Polo (1977) gave birth to a dynasty of fragrance for the house on top of being the pinnacle of oakmoss usage. We can keep going back if we want, as Azzaro Pour Homme (1978) became a peak aromatic fougère, while Paco Rabanne Pour Homme (1973) pretty much invented the aromatic fougère style altogether. Aramis (1965) took a women's genre and made it for men when perfumer Bernard Chant subverted his formula for Gres Cabochard (1959) into Aramis,, while Faberge Brut (1963) made the barbershop scents of old feel sexier than they ever had by just adding a shot of greenery, feminine florals to the heart, and a cheesy medallion around the bottle's neck. Hell, Old Spice (1937) was a floundering women's oriental that became a happy accident success for men when it was shipped over to GIs in WWII (so they would stink less) and they came back home wanting more of the stuff.

    Then you have all the "first notable" stuff like the first notable use of calone (New West -1988), the first notable use of hedione (Eau Sauvage - 1966), the first notable use of Isobutyl quinoline (Knize Ten - 1924), the first notable chypre (Chypre de Coty 1917), the first abstract fragrance (Jicky - 1889), the first fougère and first notable use of coumarin (Fougère Royale 1882), the first notable eau de colognes (Farina and 4711, late 1700's).. on and on and so forth...


    ...which brings me to my point. Aventus is a good fragrance and an unlikely breakout success given its market position and price point, but that is more indicative of our economy, income inequality, and the extreme focus on self-image and materialism the folks who buy this kind of stuff have now versus where we were when all these other fragrances hit the market. Luxury is less luxurious now and more about symbolism than true indulgence or creature comfort, which is why the bold and decadent scents like Jicky, Kouros, Fahrenheit, or even stuff as recent as M7 will never be seen again outside of niche lines. Aventus might have had a huge financial impact on the house of Creed itself, and has become the closest thing to ubiquitous as a $500 fragrance can be, but I think the zeitgeist we see in the fragrance community is the true extent of any long-term influence it has had, since even stuff like Bleu de Chanel (2010) and Dior Sauvage (2015) has had more permanent long-term influence on the future of masculine perfume than Aventus.
    To piggy back on ZC's comment, and to answer the title question... Yes.


    I, still, to this day, don't smell as much Aventus in the wild as I do Old Spice. Until Aventus puts in the time like all the classics that have weathered multiple generations, it's nothing more than a fad to me. I'm not knocking the scent. I've owned it since it was released and will always have it in the wardrobe. It's absolutely had a phenomenal impact. No denying. But as ZC pointed out, it hasn't even reached the level of its older brother GIT. It's not legendary, yet...
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  21. #21

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    This is definitely a real "can of worms" question, but I'll give chase.

    Creed Aventus (2010) is probably the greatest 21st century Creed masculine thus far, has inspired countless lower-market clones because it exists in a price bracket that makes people detecting it on the wearer think that wearer is successful, and is the men's equivalent of a handbag at this point, giving cause for imitation just like said handbags. However, from an artistic and industry perspective, I don't think it has been half as impactful as fragrance hobbyists like to believe, unless the shallow, self-absorbed corporate ladder-climber "social Darwinist" type is the only segment anyone is trying to sell masculine fragrances to these days, and I don't think there are enough Patrick Batemans in the world to sustain a market of this size if that is so. The novel use of pineapple, white florals, ambergris, vetiver, and oakmoss has indeed created an accord unlike almost any other before it, but I don't think this is even the most influential Creed in the market, because Green Irish Tweed (1985) literally helped pave the way for one of the perfumers who worked on it (a then-uncredited Pierre Bourdon) to recycle GIT's primary accord into the world's first modern aquatic: Cool Water (1988). Without Green Irish Tweed, an entire genre that has become one of the most popular among men would not even exist.

    If we move past the scope of the ultra-luxe Creed, we'll see in a big-picture view that even though Green Irish Tweed was the genesis of a genre, little else from the house (including Aventus) has had anywhere near that kind of ripple-effect impact. Long before designers just consigned themselves to cranking out multitudes of variation on a single aromachemical theme to capture the biggest short-term profit yields, they actually tried competing to find the "next big thing", and the ones who landed on it were etched in stone as pioneers of the field. Thierry Mugler A*Men (1996) literally gave birth to the gourmand craze in men's fragrance, while Calvin Klein Eternity for Men (1989) was the first "Fresh Fougère" which set the pace for the next 15 or so years. Dior Fahrenheit (1988) was and still is such a bizzare abstract piece of work that people still turn heads and talk about it 30 years later. Hermes Bel Ami (1986) was a pinnacle in the leather chypre field, Kouros (1981) gave birth to the musky animalic fougère which dominated the 80's, while Ralph Lauren Polo (1977) gave birth to a dynasty of fragrance for the house on top of being the pinnacle of oakmoss usage. We can keep going back if we want, as Azzaro Pour Homme (1978) became a peak aromatic fougère, while Paco Rabanne Pour Homme (1973) pretty much invented the aromatic fougère style altogether. Aramis (1965) took a women's genre and made it for men when perfumer Bernard Chant subverted his formula for Gres Cabochard (1959) into Aramis,, while Faberge Brut (1963) made the barbershop scents of old feel sexier than they ever had by just adding a shot of greenery, feminine florals to the heart, and a cheesy medallion around the bottle's neck. Hell, Old Spice (1937) was a floundering women's oriental that became a happy accident success for men when it was shipped over to GIs in WWII (so they would stink less) and they came back home wanting more of the stuff.

    Then you have all the "first notable" stuff like the first notable use of calone (New West -1988), the first notable use of hedione (Eau Sauvage - 1966), the first notable use of Isobutyl quinoline (Knize Ten - 1924), the first notable chypre (Chypre de Coty 1917), the first abstract fragrance (Jicky - 1889), the first fougère and first notable use of coumarin (Fougère Royale 1882), the first notable eau de colognes (Farina and 4711, late 1700's).. on and on and so forth...


    ...which brings me to my point. Aventus is a good fragrance and an unlikely breakout success given its market position and price point, but that is more indicative of our economy, income inequality, and the extreme focus on self-image and materialism the folks who buy this kind of stuff have now versus where we were when all these other fragrances hit the market. Luxury is less luxurious now and more about symbolism than true indulgence or creature comfort, which is why the bold and decadent scents like Jicky, Kouros, Fahrenheit, or even stuff as recent as M7 will never be seen again outside of niche lines. Aventus might have had a huge financial impact on the house of Creed itself, and has become the closest thing to ubiquitous as a $500 fragrance can be, but I think the zeitgeist we see in the fragrance community is the true extent of any long-term influence it has had, since even stuff like Bleu de Chanel (2010) and Dior Sauvage (2015) has had more permanent long-term influence on the future of masculine perfume than Aventus.
    Wow thanks for the great info and I didn't know that about old spice


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  22. #22

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Zealot Crusader, a sincere thank you for very sound and credible cultural thinking. Analogy to handbags is an accuarate one, I think.

    It's probably one of those rare cases, where a product in luxury segment (price-wise) is mostly sold to the people who usually cannot afford to buy luxury. Super unlikely status symbol, one that is almost exclusively used to appear as something that one in reality is not. But in a way it's a logical continuum to lower middle-class buying Chanel and Hermes fragrances. People who are not even close to being able to buy their bags or accessories can buy a little piece of "real" luxury in perfume form. In the end, fragrances are very cheap. One wear of even Aventus costs next to nothing. Aventus is psychologically interesting. It's groupthink, yes, but this groupthink was born to get out of other groupthink. It's very depressive when any common ogre can wear the same panty-dropping designer fragrances as me, the very special me. Something had to be done and wearing a fragrance that is very agreeable and safe, yet way more expensive, was a logical solution to this problem. And what's even better, it turns out that this fragrance is also very popular, so there is no fear of being weird or anything, phew. I guess Aventus is a good parable of the weird dynamics of individualism and collectivism of these times.

    To answer the question: in Finland no one knows Aventus and I have never smelled it on anyone. Here Acqua di Gio, Le Male and Sauvage have been the most successful and impactful fragrances of this millennium.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    ...which brings me to my point. Aventus is a good fragrance and an unlikely breakout success given its market position and price point, but that is more indicative of our economy, income inequality, and the extreme focus on self-image and materialism the folks who buy this kind of stuff have now versus where we were when all these other fragrances hit the market. Luxury is less luxurious now and more about symbolism than true indulgence or creature comfort, which is why the bold and decadent scents like Jicky, Kouros, Fahrenheit, or even stuff as recent as M7 will never be seen again outside of niche lines. Aventus might have had a huge financial impact on the house of Creed itself, and has become the closest thing to ubiquitous as a $500 fragrance can be, but I think the zeitgeist we see in the fragrance community is the true extent of any long-term influence it has had, since even stuff like Bleu de Chanel (2010) and Dior Sauvage (2015) has had more permanent long-term influence on the future of masculine perfume than Aventus.
    Very well put, all of it, but especially this last bit.

    Something like Aventus is a sign of the times, a reflection of where we are as a consumption-based society. It's not a flattering picture.
    Most worn:

    Black Comme des Garçons, Borneo 1834 Serge Lutens, Patchouli Santa Maria Novella


  24. #24
    Dependent Davem81's Avatar
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    It was before my time, but I'd certainly put forward Polo as being in this discussion. It was truly massive and ubiquitous in it's day, I understand.

    More recently, Pure Malt-mania was running wild at the time I first joined basenotes. Now I'm not actually suggesting it compares to Aventus - it was, I think, more a fragrance-community type thing - but it was something to behold while it lasted.

  25. #25
    Super Member yuncherrypops's Avatar
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    One Million was (and still is) absolutely huge if we're talking 2010s. CK One, A&F Fierce, and Acqua di Gio were massive when I was younger.

    Still have yet to smell Aventus on another person in real life. Maybe I don't move in the right circles
    Currently wearing: Blackmail by Kerosene

  26. #26

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Did Aventus have an impact? Like something like Cool Water, No 5 or even stuff like Angel/AMen, Le Male, etc, etc? Are there tons of scents copying it, do the Aventus royal pineapple fragrances dominate the market and school yards/offices?

    Personally had 0 impact on me. I'd see it like something like Bleu de Chanel just for people who like to spend more money to feel more exclusive (and a bit royal), even though a ton of people supposedly seem to wear it.

  27. #27

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Impact-wise? No, It is the King of Kings as far as 'niche' goes and deservedly imo

  28. #28

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zealot Crusader View Post
    This is definitely a real "can of worms" question, but I'll give chase.

    Creed Aventus (2010) is probably the greatest 21st century Creed masculine thus far, has inspired countless lower-market clones because it exists in a price bracket that makes people detecting it on the wearer think that wearer is successful, and is the men's equivalent of a handbag at this point, giving cause for imitation just like said handbags. However, from an artistic and industry perspective, I don't think it has been half as impactful as fragrance hobbyists like to believe, unless the shallow, self-absorbed corporate ladder-climber "social Darwinist" type is the only segment anyone is trying to sell masculine fragrances to these days, and I don't think there are enough Patrick Batemans in the world to sustain a market of this size if that is so. The novel use of pineapple, white florals, ambergris, vetiver, and oakmoss has indeed created an accord unlike almost any other before it, but I don't think this is even the most influential Creed in the market, because Green Irish Tweed (1985) literally helped pave the way for one of the perfumers who worked on it (a then-uncredited Pierre Bourdon) to recycle GIT's primary accord into the world's first modern aquatic: Cool Water (1988). Without Green Irish Tweed, an entire genre that has become one of the most popular among men would not even exist.

    If we move past the scope of the ultra-luxe Creed, we'll see in a big-picture view that even though Green Irish Tweed was the genesis of a genre, little else from the house (including Aventus) has had anywhere near that kind of ripple-effect impact. Long before designers just consigned themselves to cranking out multitudes of variation on a single aromachemical theme to capture the biggest short-term profit yields, they actually tried competing to find the "next big thing", and the ones who landed on it were etched in stone as pioneers of the field. Thierry Mugler A*Men (1996) literally gave birth to the gourmand craze in men's fragrance, while Calvin Klein Eternity for Men (1989) was the first "Fresh Fougère" which set the pace for the next 15 or so years. Dior Fahrenheit (1988) was and still is such a bizzare abstract piece of work that people still turn heads and talk about it 30 years later. Hermes Bel Ami (1986) was a pinnacle in the leather chypre field, Kouros (1981) gave birth to the musky animalic fougère which dominated the 80's, while Ralph Lauren Polo (1977) gave birth to a dynasty of fragrance for the house on top of being the pinnacle of oakmoss usage. We can keep going back if we want, as Azzaro Pour Homme (1978) became a peak aromatic fougère, while Paco Rabanne Pour Homme (1973) pretty much invented the aromatic fougère style altogether. Aramis (1965) took a women's genre and made it for men when perfumer Bernard Chant subverted his formula for Gres Cabochard (1959) into Aramis,, while Faberge Brut (1963) made the barbershop scents of old feel sexier than they ever had by just adding a shot of greenery, feminine florals to the heart, and a cheesy medallion around the bottle's neck. Hell, Old Spice (1937) was a floundering women's oriental that became a happy accident success for men when it was shipped over to GIs in WWII (so they would stink less) and they came back home wanting more of the stuff.

    Then you have all the "first notable" stuff like the first notable use of calone (New West -1988), the first notable use of hedione (Eau Sauvage - 1966), the first notable use of Isobutyl quinoline (Knize Ten - 1924), the first notable chypre (Chypre de Coty 1917), the first abstract fragrance (Jicky - 1889), the first fougère and first notable use of coumarin (Fougère Royale 1882), the first notable eau de colognes (Farina and 4711, late 1700's).. on and on and so forth...


    ...which brings me to my point. Aventus is a good fragrance and an unlikely breakout success given its market position and price point, but that is more indicative of our economy, income inequality, and the extreme focus on self-image and materialism the folks who buy this kind of stuff have now versus where we were when all these other fragrances hit the market. Luxury is less luxurious now and more about symbolism than true indulgence or creature comfort, which is why the bold and decadent scents like Jicky, Kouros, Fahrenheit, or even stuff as recent as M7 will never be seen again outside of niche lines. Aventus might have had a huge financial impact on the house of Creed itself, and has become the closest thing to ubiquitous as a $500 fragrance can be, but I think the zeitgeist we see in the fragrance community is the true extent of any long-term influence it has had, since even stuff like Bleu de Chanel (2010) and Dior Sauvage (2015) has had more permanent long-term influence on the future of masculine perfume than Aventus.
    The Old Spice comment is so funny to me my 93 year old grandfather still uses old spice daily. I recently got into fragrances. I am leaning toward the barbershop scents I am thinking mainly due to still loving old spice from when I was younger and would hang out at my grandparents house. Just feels right if that makes any sense. I recently got a sample of "at the barber's" as well as "GIT". Funny my wife is not impressed with GIT. She did like "at the barbers" though. So I my next purchase may be that.

    As far as the OP's comment on Creed. Honestly coming from a blue collar home. I never even heard of it until coming to this site. Of course I had never heard of Creed at all. So maybe like stated its very common for the guys making 6 figures plus. Most blue collar guys in the USA will have no clue what it is. That being said I am going to get a 8ML sample to see what the fuss is.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Aventus and bleu de Chanel have been game changers, no doubt. Aventus for the white collar crowd and pick up artist community, and bleu for everyone else. Sauvage should be added to this but less so than Bleu.

  30. #30
    Dependent MattJP's Avatar
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    Default Re: Has there ever been another men's frag that had the impact Aventus has?

    Sure... Brut and Jovan Musk. More for the masses/common man. But these, along with others mentioned have had a far greater impact on mens fragrance wearing.




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