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  1. #31
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    I own vintage versions of Eau Fraiche, Diorella, and Eau Sauvage, and I don't believe anyone contributing to this thread would have any trouble telling the three apart after 15 minutes of their development on skin.

    They may all share that buoyant citrus opening that Roudnitska so loved (and originated with Eau d'Hermes), but Eau Fraiche has none of the hesperidic, herbaceous tones of Eau Sauvage and is far more woody, and neither of those two have any of the luscious decayed fruit that Diorella features so prominently.

    And as for the NST's contention that "both Eau Sauvage and Diorella could also be called the grandchildren of Diorissimo (see Michael Edwards, Perfume Legends, p. 160)", with all due respect to Michael Edwards, that just seems like pure balderdash to me. Diorissimo feels absolutely sui generis in the Roudnitska family, IMHO, and has none of the classic scaffolding of a chypre at all.
    Last edited by Cook.bot; 23rd February 2019 at 02:22 PM. Reason: poor edit!

  2. #32

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Any thoughts about the 're-constituted' Parfum de Therese, the Roudnitska Jnr. gave to Malle for his line?
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  3. #33
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by Cook.bot View Post
    I own vintage versions of Eau Fraiche, Diorella, and Eau Sauvage, and I don't believe anyone contributing to this thread would have any trouble telling the three apart after 15 minutes of their development on skin.

    They may all share that buoyant citrus opening that Roudnitska so loved (and originated with Eau d'Hermes), but Eau Fraiche has none of the hesperidic, herbaceous tones of Eau Sauvage and is far more woody, and neither of those two have any of the luscious decayed fruit that Diorella features so prominently.

    And as for the NST's contention that "both Eau Sauvage and Diorella could also be called the grandchildren of Diorissimo (see Michael Edwards, Perfume Legends, p. 160)", with all due respect to Michael Edwards, that just seems like pure balderdash to me. Diorissimo feels absolutely sui generis in the Roudnitska family, IMHO, and has none of the classic scaffolding of a chypre at all.
    That supposed relationship with Diorissimo - clearly nonsense! You're right about hedione, too (my mistake).

    I haven't smelled Eau Fraîche for a couple of years but remember it being distinctly citrus/hesperidic, with an element of juiciness (for want of a better word) enhanced by the overripe melon in Diorella.

    In any case for the purposes of this exercise I guess we have to agree that oranges and lemons ≠ fruit!

  4. #34
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by saminlondon View Post
    I haven't smelled Eau Fraîche for a couple of years but remember it being distinctly citrus/hesperidic, with an element of juiciness (for want of a better word) enhanced by the overripe melon in Diorella.
    Ooops, poor editing on my part -- I typed hesperidic when I meant herbaceous, and then neglected to delete the former. Now corrected. And you're absolutely right about Eau Fraiche, quite juicy, with a lightly woody heart, and virtually no drydown (possibly due to the old age of my bottle).

    In any case for the purposes of this exercise I guess we have to agree that oranges and lemons ≠ fruit!
    I can go along with that, but the difference between the fresh and the decayed is so enormous that they're like different beasts altogether.

    Cacio once hosted a sample pass to showcase some of Christine Nagel's decayed fruits, and when she used citrus for that purpose it took on an almost animalic, skanky character -- diametrically opposed to its usual light, energizing role.

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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    I agree that there is a big difference between regular fruit as usually done in perfumery, and overripe.

    I went look for my bottle and found out I have something called Dior Eau de Cologne fraiche. Not sure what the relation is to regular Eau Fraiche. anyway, what I have seems rather old and is not in perfect state. The top seems to have zingy fresh citrus (bergamot and lemon). No overripe fruit, but it goes into a light mossy drydown, which is barely perceptible but actually last a long time.

  6. #36
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    [*]Are there any modern perfumes that follow in the footsteps of Mitsouko?
    [*]What are the classical masculine versions of this genre?
    Another modern: Emotionnelle (Parfums DelRae) by Michel Roudnitska.
    Masculine (half) vintage version: Ocean Rain (Mario Valentino) by Edmond Roudnitska.
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  7. #37

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. reasonable View Post
    Any thoughts about the 're-constituted' Parfum de Therese, the Roudnitska Jnr. gave to Malle for his line?
    I quite like it, especially considering the impact of regulations. Le Parfum de Thérèse shares the ripe melon + jasmine combination of Diorella, although the melon here has a more noticeable aquatic nuance to me. Compared to vintage Diorella, it's evident that Le Parfum de Thérèse doesn't have the same mossy base anymore, but its powdery leather base cleverly maintains a similarly elegant yet sensual spirit.

  8. #38

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Cool I like it but it does seem to 'miss' a little for the reasons you mention compared to 'vintish' Roudnitska. Nice it saw the light of day even if slightly 'tweaked' for IFRA regs.
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  9. #39
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. reasonable View Post
    Any thoughts about the 're-constituted' Parfum de Therese, the Roudnitska Jnr. gave to Malle for his line?
    Quote Originally Posted by StellaDiverFlynn View Post
    I quite like it, especially considering the impact of regulations. Le Parfum de Thérèse shares the ripe melon + jasmine combination of Diorella, although the melon here has a more noticeable aquatic nuance to me. Compared to vintage Diorella, it's evident that Le Parfum de Thérèse doesn't have the same mossy base anymore, but its powdery leather base cleverly maintains a similarly elegant yet sensual spirit.
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. reasonable View Post
    Cool I like it but it does seem to 'miss' a little for the reasons you mention compared to 'vintish' Roudnitska. Nice it saw the light of day even if slightly 'tweaked' for IFRA regs.
    I won't argue with StellaDiverFlynn's calm and judicious assessment of Le Parfum de Therese, but since I am a hardened vintage-loving geek, I will say that I found it thin, wan, and short lived when compared to other Roudnitska perfumes. Also, given that calone was first developed in the late1960's and popularized in perfumery much later, I found the aquatic melon note to be a quite jarring element in a composition that is said to date back to the 1950's. If Parfum de Therese is based on a 1950's Roudnitska formula, it has been more than slightly tweaked. Perhaps La Parfum de Therese is a revival of Ocean Rain (1990)?
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  10. #40
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    • Are there any modern perfumes that follow in the footsteps of Mitsouko?, I asked.


    Here's one that I am testing: Labdanum Doux in the new sideline JD Jeffrey Dame. The perfumer is Hugh Spencer.

    https://jeffreydame.com/collections/...0-ml-1-7-fl-oz

    The opening strongly evokes Mitsouko with a creamy fruitiness and vivid citrus. There is a beautiful sparkling floral composition here: I just wish the base were richer and deeper. Despite the stated notes of patchouli, benzoin, musk, treemoss, labdanum, the perfume trails off quickly after the floral symphony of the middle phase. On the other hand, it was a treat to test a new perfume in which the dry down didn't get bogged down in heavy woody AC. My sample is of the now discontinued perfume oil, and I wonder if I would prefer the texture and wear of the EDP. Very reasonable and certainly worth a sniff.
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  11. #41

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    I won't argue with StellaDiverFlynn's calm and judicious assessment of Le Parfum de Therese, but since I am a hardened vintage-loving geek, I will say that I found it thin, wan, and short lived when compared to other Roudnitska perfumes. Also, given that calone was first developed in the late1960's and popularized in perfumery much later, I found the aquatic melon note to be a quite jarring element in a composition that is said to date back to the 1950's. If Parfum de Therese is based on a 1950's Roudnitska formula, it has been more than slightly tweaked. Perhaps La Parfum de Therese is a revival of Ocean Rain (1990)?
    It's entirely possible that Michel Roudnitska took some artistic liberty or adjusted the formula according to the modern ingredients at his disposal, although I didn't think of Calone when smelling the current Le Parfum de Thérèse, as this ingredient usually smells more like a "fishy" marine note than aquatic to me. I'm guessing that the aquatic nuance in LPDT does not necessarily come from Calone, but can possibly be evoked by another ingredient or as a combined effect from different materials, although I don't know whether it's achievable by materials available at that time.


    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    • Are there any modern perfumes that follow in the footsteps of Mitsouko?, I asked.


    Here's one that I am testing: Labdanum Doux in the new sideline JD Jeffrey Dame. The perfumer is Hugh Spencer.

    https://jeffreydame.com/collections/...0-ml-1-7-fl-oz

    The opening strongly evokes Mitsouko with a creamy fruitiness and vivid citrus. There is a beautiful sparkling floral composition here: I just wish the base were richer and deeper. Despite the stated notes of patchouli, benzoin, musk, treemoss, labdanum, the perfume trails off quickly after the floral symphony of the middle phase. On the other hand, it was a treat to test a new perfume in which the dry down didn't get bogged down in heavy woody AC. My sample is of the now discontinued perfume oil, and I wonder if I would prefer the texture and wear of the EDP. Very reasonable and certainly worth a sniff.
    Your description of Labdanum Doux sounds lovely! I've ordered a sample of oil and hope it arrives soon. I really hope they don't discontinue the oil version as it's the only format available for international shipping from them.

    The modern perfumes that I find follow the footsteps of Mitsouko the most closely are: Roja Dove Diaghilev, Hiram Green Shangri-La, Aftelier Bergamoss and Sultan Pasha Encens Chypre (attar). All four of them have the lactonic peach/bright tart bergamot similar to Mitsouko, but they are also less mossy/dry and more oriental/voluptuous/hedonic/optimistic than Mitsouko.

    Diaghilev is probably the closest one to Mitsouko to my nose, but made richer and more opulent, as if Mitsouko puts on her most "bling-bling" dress for a grand occasion.

    Shangri-La also has a more opulent, or rather hedonic vibe than Mitousko. It's also less mossy than Diaghilev ad Mitsouko, which makes it skew a bit more oriental and feels smoother and more enveloping to me.

    Bergamoss feels like Mitsouko when she was still a carefree maid, or like spring to Mitsouko's autumn. Its peach fruit aspect is more succulent and luminous, and sometimes even smells like osmanthus to me, while its mossy base feels also fresher than Mitousko, with less the sombre autumnal vibe of its woody mossy base.

    Encens Chypre is probably the most different one from Mitsouko, mostly because of its addition of a cool olibanum incense and a more pronounced animalic presence. It still retains the peach-moss core of Mitsouko, although less dry woody and sometimes closer to the more tender peach moss in Bergamoss.

    Meanwhile, Acqua di Parma Profumo (I only know the modern version) and Amouage Jubilation Woman feels more like cousin to Mitsouko. The fruity chypre structure is there, but they don't smell "directly" peachy to me, more like a peachy illusion stemming from a combination of notes, along with a champagne-like, bubbling, luminous effect that I don't relate to Mitsouko. And they too feel less mossy, less dry and more oriental in comparison

    Interestingly, Jacques Fath L'Iris de Fath in the middle phase also reminds me of Mitousko, but more colourful, like Mitsouko on a techinicolour film, and in a luxurious robe of orris butter.

  12. #42

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by cacio View Post
    Here are some entries in the perfumery association list:
    D2 - Chypre fruite'
    Mitsouko
    Molyneux Le numero cinq
    Lanvin Rumeur
    Rochas Femme
    Diorama
    Fath Canasta (never heard of this)
    Balenciaga Quadrille
    Molyneux Fete
    Y
    Diorella
    Cristalle
    Azzaro
    Cardin Chock
    Yvresse
    Rykiel Le Parfum
    Nina Ricci Deci Dela
    Azzaro Azzura
    Gucci Rush (?)

    Only one entry among masculines:
    Goutal Sables (which has me a bit puzzled. But I guess it doesn't fit into any of the other categories they have)
    Great list! I was going to add Gucci Rush for the modern interpretation category. Of course, Rush utilizes Vetiver and Patchouli to substitute the oakmoss, but in my opinion, this is done to great effect, considering the intended loud opacity of the fragrance. Rush is what happens when one pursues the lactonic and peachy elements of Mitsouko with a broad brush modernism sketch of its structure and follows these ideas in one direction to their logical end. Rush is an example of reaching an endpoint in the lactonic chypre fruity direction— a pulsing, fluorescent, driving endpoint. Personally, I love it.

    Badgley Mischka is another modern interpretation of the chypre fruity. I find it misses some oomph without the oakmoss, but I find it pretty.
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  13. #43
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by StellaDiverFlynn View Post
    The modern perfumes that I find follow the footsteps of Mitsouko the most closely are: Roja Dove Diaghilev, Hiram Green Shangri-La, Aftelier Bergamoss and Sultan Pasha Encens Chypre (attar). All four of them have the lactonic peach/bright tart bergamot similar to Mitsouko, but they are also less mossy/dry and more oriental/voluptuous/hedonic/optimistic than Mitsouko.

    Diaghilev is probably the closest one to Mitsouko to my nose, but made richer and more opulent, as if Mitsouko puts on her most "bling-bling" dress for a grand occasion.
    I was going to mention Diaghilev, though to my nose it's much closer to Femme than Mitsouko, especially with the cumin.

  14. #44

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    I stumbled upon a miniature of Fath Canasta recently, and it smells indeed like a progeny of Mitsouko, with a lactonic, dried peach note on a mossy woody base. The difference I perceive is that the peach in Canasta is much more dominant while the woody mossy base is more discreet. Therefore, the peach in Canasta is less dry and more luscious and voluptuous. It also lacks the cinnamon-like warm spicy touch in Mitsouko. I'd place it midway between Mitsouko and Patou Lasso.

    By the way, has anyone tried Molyneux Le Numéro Cinq? I'm puzzled by its inclusion in the Perfumers Society list as it smells more like a green chypre with a bright aldehydic and citrus opening instead of something closely relating to Mitsouko.

  15. #45

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by StellaDiverFlynn View Post
    Meanwhile, Acqua di Parma Profumo (I only know the modern version) and Amouage Jubilation Woman feels more like cousin to Mitsouko. The fruity chypre structure is there, but they don't smell "directly" peachy to me, more like a peachy illusion stemming from a combination of notes, along with a champagne-like, bubbling, luminous effect that I don't relate to Mitsouko. And they too feel less mossy, less dry and more oriental in comparison.
    I recommend anyone who can to try the earlier AdP Profumo (red box). It has a lot of 'heft' and IMO is a 'plummy' Mitsouko. Beautiful stuff.
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  16. #46
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. reasonable View Post
    I recommend anyone who can to try the earlier AdP Profumo (red box). It has a lot of 'heft' and IMO is a 'plummy' Mitsouko. Beautiful stuff.
    But isn't it discontinued / out of production?

    Extremely hard to find in my experience.
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  17. #47
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by StellaDiverFlynn View Post
    By the way, has anyone tried Molyneux Le Numéro Cinq? I'm puzzled by its inclusion in the Perfumers Society list as it smells more like a green chypre with a bright aldehydic and citrus opening instead of something closely relating to Mitsouko.
    Hi StellaDiverFlynn-


    I don’t find LeNumeroCinq especially green or fruity. What does your bottle look like? Turin described Le Cinq as “the only example I know of an iris oriental” which of course just whetted my appetite to find a bottle. I have this well preserved cologne that appears in ads from the 1950’s:

    IMG_1018.jpg


    I haven’t worn my LeNC too much (too many vintage bottles, too little time) so prompted by your query, I transferred some to an atomizer and have been wearing it around, including a full day at work. The cologne wears close to the skin but it has excellent depth and longevity. There are plenty of vintage aldehydes giving Le Cinq a dry, but not astringent, powdery texture (it’s not creamy/waxy like vintage No.5). The composition definitely features orris with its characteristic bready, slightly sweet tone. It also contains some long lasting bergamot that lifts and enlivens the whole. The floral notes are not in the forefront--perhaps jasmine and some violet/lilac toned ionones? LeNC has a resinous dark base with many undercurrents -- labdanum, oakmoss, sandalwood, musk, and a subtle spiciness and smokiness. It is not animalic: LeNC is dry, dark, but clean. It makes me think of other unfathomable, surprisingly unisex woody vintages such Dana Emir, Lelong Sirocco...


    Barbara Herman thought LeNC possessed a “heavy spicy sweetness” with notes of “stewed fruit” and it reminded her of Tabu. (I don't get as much spice/clove in the cologne.) It is often listed as a “fruity chypre” but it does not strike me as such. It certainly contains some Prunol, but more as a background, textural element. So I would I classify Le Numero Cinq? Perhaps as a woody chypre, a cross between vintage Mitsouko and vintage No. 5. One of the participants in a discussion of LeNumeroCinque on a French forum aligns it with Le Dix, and I found that to be persuasive as well.

    I wouldn’t rule out the possibility that the composition of Le Numero Cinque may have been changed during its fifty-odd years on the market. Has anyone else tried this obscure vintage?
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  18. #48
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    An “iris oriental”?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! I need to sample this!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  19. #49

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    Hi StellaDiverFlynn-


    I don’t find LeNumeroCinq especially green or fruity. What does your bottle look like? Turin described Le Cinq as “the only example I know of an iris oriental” which of course just whetted my appetite to find a bottle. I have this well preserved cologne that appears in ads from the 1950’s:


    I haven’t worn my LeNC too much (too many vintage bottles, too little time) so prompted by your query, I transferred some to an atomizer and have been wearing it around, including a full day at work. The cologne wears close to the skin but it has excellent depth and longevity. There are plenty of vintage aldehydes giving Le Cinq a dry, but not astringent, powdery texture (it’s not creamy/waxy like vintage No.5). The composition definitely features orris with its characteristic bready, slightly sweet tone. It also contains some long lasting bergamot that lifts and enlivens the whole. The floral notes are not in the forefront--perhaps jasmine and some violet/lilac toned ionones? LeNC has a resinous dark base with many undercurrents -- labdanum, oakmoss, sandalwood, musk, and a subtle spiciness and smokiness. It is not animalic: LeNC is dry, dark, but clean. It makes me think of other unfathomable, surprisingly unisex woody vintages such Dana Emir, Lelong Sirocco...


    Barbara Herman thought LeNC possessed a “heavy spicy sweetness” with notes of “stewed fruit” and it reminded her of Tabu. (I don't get as much spice/clove in the cologne.) It is often listed as a “fruity chypre” but it does not strike me as such. It certainly contains some Prunol, but more as a background, textural element. So I would I classify Le Numero Cinq? Perhaps as a woody chypre, a cross between vintage Mitsouko and vintage No. 5. One of the participants in a discussion of LeNumeroCinque on a French forum aligns it with Le Dix, and I found that to be persuasive as well.

    I wouldn’t rule out the possibility that the composition of Le Numero Cinque may have been changed during its fifty-odd years on the market. Has anyone else tried this obscure vintage?
    Thank you grayspoole for the detailed and knowledgeable description. My bottle is of the same packaging as in the following picture but of a smaller size, possibly a parfum between 1940-60s according to the website hosting the photo.

    cinq3.jpg

    I should not have described it as green. It was a careless mistake of my part. Large part of my exprience echos with yours: aldehyde-dominant and bergamot opening, "dry, not astrigent, powdery texture", an almost woody undertone, overall "not animalic...but clean". I find the comparison with Le Dix persuasive too, with its abstract purple floral heart and a demure rooty orris, although I find it more starchy in Le Numéro Cinq. It does impart a subtle peachy fruity tonality, but like you described, more like a complementary element than a structure-defining one. What differs from my perception to your description is that I do get a prominent spicy element especially in the opening, but more gingery than something Tabu-like described by Herman. When the spices prolonged into the clean powdery floral heart, it evokes a creamy ivory soap-like carnation accord not dissimilar to Godet Petite Fleur Bleue and a less peachy Patou Makila. Because of its strong powdery aldehydic character, I would probably describe it as an aldehydic floral chypre when smelling it blind.

  20. #50
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Balenciaga Le Dix?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! Tried it. Loved it. VIOLETS!!!!!!!!!!! I’m convinced I have to sample this Molyneaux. Now I’m off to the directory to look up the Godet and the Patou you speak of.

  21. #51
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    I’m baaaaaaaack. MOLYNEUX LE NUMERO CINQ!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  22. #52
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts


  23. #53

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by Shemelimelle View Post
    Balenciaga Le Dix?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! Tried it. Loved it. VIOLETS!!!!!!!!!!! I’m convinced I have to sample this Molyneaux. Now I’m off to the directory to look up the Godet and the Patou you speak of.
    If you're after violet, I'm not entirely sure Le Numéro Cinq will satisfy your craving because it's like the floral orris heart of Le Dix skipped of violet to me. Petite Fleur Bleue and Makila evoke a kind of soapy clean carnation that is present in Le Numéro Cinq but not in Le Dix to my nose.

  24. #54
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Orris is just as addictive to me, if it’s in there!!!!!!! These days, Violet frags come off smelling like grape juice, as in Exultant by Maria Candide Gentile. I remember somone else saying green apple for a Wasser Guerlain, the name I can’t remember. My sample of Balenciaga Le Dix didn’t smell like it survived that well, but whatever was left of it was a very true violet, with the remnants of Chanel no.5 hovering somewhere in the background, faded with time. If Molyneux, Le Numero Cinq, is the orris oriental described above, with an “orris floral heart”, this is a scent I would go totally crazy for!!!!!!!!

  25. #55
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    And how funny the bottle sorta reminds me of my Grossmith!

  26. #56

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Resurrecting this thread as I recently got to smell L de Lubin in its EDT concentration, and I find quite similar to the ripe melon-jasmine/woody mossy patchouli of Diorella. The major difference that I perceive is that L de Lubin doesn't have the clever touch of cumin in Diorella, and it has also less of the sparkling citrus, thus its melon note appears sweeter and less translucent to my nose.

  27. #57
    Basenotes Junkie grayspoole's Avatar
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    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by StellaDiverFly View Post
    Resurrecting this thread as I recently got to smell L de Lubin in its EDT concentration, and I find quite similar to the ripe melon-jasmine/woody mossy patchouli of Diorella.
    Interesting to know, StellaDiverFlynn. I've never tried L de Lubin, and I tend to think of Diorella as sui generis, which may be inaccurate.

    Did you test the vintage or current? On Fragrantica, I read ”L de Lubin was created by Lucien Ferrero in 1974, and reformulated identically (according to new health restrictions) by him in 2008" although some reviewers seem to think the reissue is not all that "identical."

    The 1970's bottle is definitely cool though, like a cross between the Givenchy III and Empreinte bottles:

    IMG_3082.JPG
    Currently wearing: Muse by Coty

  28. #58

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    I would add Balenciaga Rumba to the list. Not the best one around, obviously, but quite a good one with character.

  29. #59

    Default Re: Vintage Fruity Chypres-Your Favorites, Your Thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by grayspoole View Post
    Interesting to know, StellaDiverFlynn. I've never tried L de Lubin, and I tend to think of Diorella as sui generis, which may be inaccurate.

    Did you test the vintage or current? On Fragrantica, I read ”L de Lubin was created by Lucien Ferrero in 1974, and reformulated identically (according to new health restrictions) by him in 2008" although some reviewers seem to think the reissue is not all that "identical."

    The 1970's bottle is definitely cool though, like a cross between the Givenchy III and Empreinte bottles:

    IMG_3082.JPG
    The bottle I got is like the one in the photo, which I think is a vintage version. I haven't tried the current version, though.

    I think the similarity of L de Lubin and Cristalle to Diorella is analogue to the kinship of Quadrille and Fête to Rochas Femme. There are definitely notable differences, but at the same time, they seem to share the same core idea (ripe melon-like jasmine & citrus & moss woody patchouli in the former case, and lactonic peach-plum & oakmoss in the later case).




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