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  1. #91
    Missing Oakmoss

    Bonnette's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by saminlondon View Post
    It is known for having a relatively short, simple formula, but I suspect that is by design rather than a result of economic factors.
    Yes. Collette Fellous makes this point in her beautiful book, Guerlain (1989), where she says:


    "In the history of perfumery, Mitsouko is indeed exemplary because its formula is short, simple and refined. It is in the same tradition as Coty's famous Chypre, launched in 1917, the main feature of a chypre perfume being its easily identifiable smell of oak moss, with a hint of cistus, patchouli and labdanum. But above all, Mitsouko possesses that wonderful peach smell, due to the use of the aldehyde C14...This synthetic substance has the property of "pushing" to their extreme those notes already found at the start and in the heart of a perfume; for Mitsouko, bergamot, rose, jasmine, spices and patchouli stand out against an animal and balsamic background."


    A relatively short list of exquisitely balanced notes is brought forward and intensified by the aldehyde, creating an aura of complexity and mystery. The peach note, itself, is persistently yet softly present in my 1972 extrait, but I have other bottles of Mitsouko where it is barely detectable. Much depends on how well the perfume has been stored, I suspect.

  2. #92
    Dependent Beck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    Yes. Collette Fellous makes this point in her beautiful book, Guerlain (1989), where she says:


    "In the history of perfumery, Mitsouko is indeed exemplary because its formula is short, simple and refined. It is in the same tradition as Coty's famous Chypre, launched in 1917, the main feature of a chypre perfume being its easily identifiable smell of oak moss, with a hint of cistus, patchouli and labdanum. But above all, Mitsouko possesses that wonderful peach smell, due to the use of the aldehyde C14...This synthetic substance has the property of "pushing" to their extreme those notes already found at the start and in the heart of a perfume; for Mitsouko, bergamot, rose, jasmine, spices and patchouli stand out against an animal and balsamic background."


    A relatively short list of exquisitely balanced notes is brought forward and intensified by the aldehyde, creating an aura of complexity and mystery. The peach note, itself, is persistently yet softly present in my 1972 extrait, but I have other bottles of Mitsouko where it is barely detectable. Much depends on how well the perfume has been stored, I suspect.
    Very interesting!!!! It answers partially my question. Just don't answer if the formula is more simple due to the post-war context. Thank you!
    I will have to revisit my sample. I didn't get oakmoss, aldehyde or peach in it. And I should since I'm not anosmic to any of them.
    "True change is within; leave the outside as it is."
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  3. #93
    Missing Oakmoss

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    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by Beck View Post
    ...Just don't answer if the formula is more simple due to the post-war context.
    Fellous doesn't discuss materials or shortages, she just says that Jacques Guerlain began working on Mitsouko during WWI, finally presenting it in 1919, when he was satisfied that he'd created a perfume that would outlast postwar fashion trends and be recognizable as a Guerlain composition. So your question remains unanswered, at least as far as Fellous' book is concerned.

  4. #94

    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    Fellous doesn't discuss materials or shortages, she just says that Jacques Guerlain began working on Mitsouko during WWI, finally presenting it in 1919, when he was satisfied that he'd created a perfume that would outlast postwar fashion trends and be recognizable as a Guerlain composition. So your question remains unanswered, at least as far as Fellous' book is concerned.
    Very interesting, thanks for sharing.

  5. #95

    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    Fellous doesn't discuss materials or shortages, she just says that Jacques Guerlain began working on Mitsouko during WWI, finally presenting it in 1919, when he was satisfied that he'd created a perfume that would outlast postwar fashion trends and be recognizable as a Guerlain composition. So your question remains unanswered, at least as far as Fellous' book is concerned.
    He got that right. It certainly outlasted postwar fashion trends!
    ​"It was foolish of her not to have bought a larger bottle."

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  6. #96

    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by FiveoaksBouquet View Post
    He got that right. It certainly outlasted postwar fashion trends!
    100%! She is glorious
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  7. #97

    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    Yes. Collette Fellous makes this point in her beautiful book, Guerlain (1989), where she says:


    "In the history of perfumery, Mitsouko is indeed exemplary because its formula is short, simple and refined. It is in the same tradition as Coty's famous Chypre, launched in 1917, the main feature of a chypre perfume being its easily identifiable smell of oak moss, with a hint of cistus, patchouli and labdanum. But above all, Mitsouko possesses that wonderful peach smell, due to the use of the aldehyde C14...This synthetic substance has the property of "pushing" to their extreme those notes already found at the start and in the heart of a perfume; for Mitsouko, bergamot, rose, jasmine, spices and patchouli stand out against an animal and balsamic background."


    A relatively short list of exquisitely balanced notes is brought forward and intensified by the aldehyde, creating an aura of complexity and mystery. The peach note, itself, is persistently yet softly present in my 1972 extrait, but I have other bottles of Mitsouko where it is barely detectable. Much depends on how well the perfume has been stored, I suspect.
    Interesting.

  8. #98
    Freed from BN Institution

    N.CAL Fragrance Reviewer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by Bonnette View Post
    Fellous doesn't discuss materials or shortages, she just says that Jacques Guerlain began working on Mitsouko during WWI, finally presenting it in 1919, when he was satisfied that he'd created a perfume that would outlast postwar fashion trends and be recognizable as a Guerlain composition. So your question remains unanswered, at least as far as Fellous' book is concerned.
    Interesting. Good to know.
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  9. #99

    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by N.CAL Fragrance Reviewer View Post
    Interesting. Good to know.
    Paul Klier of this forum has a pre WWII formula for Mitsouko that he took off the forum, because of someone being petty. If someone motivated him to find and share that formula this would not have to be speculation anymore.

  10. #100
    Dependent saminlondon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by GoldWineMemories View Post
    Paul Klier of this forum has a pre WWII formula for Mitsouko that he took off the forum, because of someone being petty. If someone motivated him to find and share that formula this would not have to be speculation anymore.
    It's not speculation. This fact about the Mitsouko formula is well attested.

    Jean-Paul Guerlain himself has said "The composition of Mitsouko is very concise, which is also true for Nahéma. Each of them holds twelve materials." (Though I've also seen the figure 19 being quoted.)

  11. #101
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    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    I received a 1999 bottle of the EDP today and wearing it now. Lovely stuff.
    Currently wearing: Touch for Men by Burberry

  12. #102

    Default Re: Mitsouko Centenary

    Quote Originally Posted by saminlondon View Post
    It's not speculation. This fact about the Mitsouko formula is well attested.

    Jean-Paul Guerlain himself has said "The composition of Mitsouko is very concise, which is also true for Nahéma. Each of them holds twelve materials." (Though I've also seen the figure 19 being quoted.)
    So far I've seen zero proof of this.




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