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  1. #31
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    So far, it appears the reformulations in general have been for worse, not better or the same. It's my hope the companies take note and find a way to curb this, all the while, challenge the current and younger generation to develop refined noses instead of allowing themselves to be continually "dumbed down" (for lack of a better word). I do not intend to offend anyone. If I did, I apologize.

  2. #32

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    So far, it appears the reformulations in general have been for worse, not better or the same.
    In general, yes.

    But there are plenty of relatively unnoticed or unremarked upon reformulations because drastic changes weren't made to the fragrance over its lifespan, and other reformulations are more different than actually quantitatively worse (for example, there are folks on here and elsewhere that prefer the newer Guerlain Vetiver to some prior incarnations). We all have different likes and dislikes and oddities. Someone who isn't an oakmoss addict might reasonably enjoy that a fragrance has been given a contemporary facelift, assuming said facelift was done with care.

    So, yes, reformulations are a very real thing, but there are also plenty of false accusations of reformulations that are fictions of the mind, and some perceived changes are real but stem primarily from factors that aren't rooted in the actual formulation (like how long the fragrance has been aged in the bottle, etc.).

    I'm always a bit bummed out when Fear of Reformulation keeps folks from trying a fragrance they might otherwise have really enjoyed or even loved. Unless the current version is an undeniable travesty I generally encourage folks to check something out if it intrigues them, regardless of reformulation concerns.
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  3. #33
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Brooks Otterlake View Post
    In general, yes.

    But there are plenty of relatively unnoticed or unremarked upon reformulations because drastic changes weren't made to the fragrance over its lifespan, and other reformulations are more different than actually quantitatively worse (for example, there are folks on here and elsewhere that prefer the newer Guerlain Vetiver to some prior incarnations). We all have different likes and dislikes and oddities. Someone who isn't an oakmoss addict might reasonably enjoy that a fragrance has been given a contemporary facelift, assuming said facelift was done with care.

    So, yes, reformulations are a very real thing, but there are also plenty of false accusations of reformulations that are fictions of the mind, and some perceived changes are real but stem primarily from factors that aren't rooted in the actual formulation (like how long the fragrance has been aged in the bottle, etc.).

    I'm always a bit bummed out when Fear of Reformulation keeps folks from trying a fragrance they might otherwise have really enjoyed or even loved. Unless the current version is an undeniable travesty I generally encourage folks to check something out if it intrigues them, regardless of reformulation concerns.
    Very well said. Thank you!

    I think it would be cool if some brands would go back to some of their more popular originals and re-offer them again as some sort of limited edition bottles, at least to see how well it does in today's world. A sort of trial run, or an anniversary tribute. Just thinking out loud.
    Last edited by LatinNote; 2nd May 2019 at 03:42 PM. Reason: Changed "vintages" to "originals"

  4. #34

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Shemelimelle View Post
    So much for a new bottle of Creed Aventus. I was so looking forward to it, too.
    well if you never smelled the original, then you'd never know it's any different, right?

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  5. #35
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Shemelimelle View Post
    So much for a new bottle of Creed Aventus. I was so looking forward to it, too.
    Have you sampled the original yet?

  6. #36
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    True, but for my $, I wouldn’t bother.
    Quote Originally Posted by masonjarjar View Post
    well if you never smelled the original, then you'd never know it's any different, right?


  7. #37
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    I won’t bother seeking out a vintage batch.
    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    Have you sampled the original yet?

  8. #38

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    I think it would be cool if some brands would go back to some of their more popular vintages and re-offer them again as some sort of limited edition bottles, at least to see how well it does in today's world. A sort of trial run, or an anniversary tribute. Just thinking out loud.
    Well, there are cases where reformulations have been done to bring things back closer to the original version after a prior reformulation more radically changed the nature of the fragrance.
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  9. #39
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Brooks Otterlake View Post
    Well, there are cases where reformulations have been done to bring things back closer to the original version after a prior reformulation more radically changed the nature of the fragrance.
    Who knows, a company or two might attempt an EXACT copy of their originals someday as a tribute or nod, which could be done as a way of thanking the fans for the support.

    Hey, a guy can dream, eh?
    Last edited by LatinNote; 2nd May 2019 at 03:43 PM. Reason: Changed "vintages" to "originals"

  10. #40
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Anyone know if Amouage Jubilation XXV has been reformulated? I believe it first came out in 2007.

  11. #41
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post
    Seconding especially Trussardi Uomo and adding Givenchy Gentleman- those two were bad boy leathers of powerhouse chypre elegance and luxurious quality, craftiness and complexity back in the day, now they are mere inoffensive designer mainstream released with just enough conformity to garner bestselling figures (or to have at least the potential to do so) without much if any effort from the respective fragrance houses
    About Givenchy, are you referring to the newly release 2016 or 2017 one? Or still talking about the patchouli heavy Givenchy Gentleman?

    If the former, the new releases are Gentleman Givenchy not Givenchy Gentleman - they swapped the words around.
    If the latter patchouli heavy ones, I can't speak to differences.
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  12. #42
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    Anyone know if Amouage Jubilation XXV has been reformulated? I believe it first came out in 2007.
    Yes it has been reformulated. There were a number of threads that discussed the differences.
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  13. #43
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by ILikePeeps View Post
    About Givenchy, are you referring to the newly release 2016 or 2017 one? Or still talking about the patchouli heavy Givenchy Gentleman?

    If the former, the new releases are Gentleman Givenchy not Givenchy Gentleman - they swapped the words around.
    If the latter patchouli heavy ones, I can't speak to differences.
    I haven't tried either myself. I've been wanting to try the original formulation for quite sometime, just haven't got around to it.
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  14. #44
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by N.CAL Fragrance Reviewer View Post
    Yes it has been reformulated. There were a number of threads that discussed the differences.
    Thank you. I will have to check out those threads.

  15. #45
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Nastka View Post
    Luten's Fleurs d'Oranger is the one where I noticed the most marked difference. I had an old sample that was heavier on the cumin, and relied less on the sweet white flower accord. Fell in love, went to buy a bottle, only to be rather disappointed that it was now leaning the other way, with practically no cumin involved.
    Ha, I had a bottle of Fleurs d'Oranger before and to me it smelled just like the tree in my Dad's backyard when I'd go out there and mow it. I read about cumin and I was confused, like... "...is there? I don't pick up on cumin..". Might explain it!

    Quote Originally Posted by N.CAL Fragrance Reviewer View Post
    I haven't tried either myself. I've been wanting to try the original formulation for quite sometime, just haven't got around to it.
    Givenchy Gentleman and Gentleman Givenchy smell nothing alike - they are wayyy different. Givenchy Gentleman is a patchouli driven old-school type frag, Gentleman Givenchy is a pleasant modern designer signature scent/dumb grab scent.
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  16. #46
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    Default Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    Who knows, a company or two might attempt an EXACT copy of their vintages someday as a tribute or nod, which could be done as a way of thanking the fans for the support.

    Hey, a guy can dream, eh?
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    Quote Originally Posted by ILikePeeps View Post
    About Givenchy, are you referring to the newly release 2016 or 2017 one? Or still talking about the patchouli heavy Givenchy Gentleman?

    If the former, the new releases are Gentleman Givenchy not Givenchy Gentleman - they swapped the words around.
    If the latter patchouli heavy ones, I can't speak to differences.
    I had a 2015-bottle of Givenchy Gentleman which was drenched in patchouly. Good stuff, mang.
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  17. #47
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Yeah, I've read that Fahrenheit was a rare exception. Thank you Marand75.
    Coolness.

  18. #48
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    Yeah, I've read that Fahrenheit was a rare exception. Thank you Marand75.
    Coolness.
    You're welcome


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  19. #49

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Calvin Klein Obsession for Men
    Davidoff Cool Water
    YSL Kouros

    All of these are extremely different to their original incarnations.
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  20. #50
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    I find it hard to believe that in this thread we're referring to "vintages" of scents that have only been around ten or 20 years. Surely to be called "vintage" something has to have been around for a longer period of time (say 30 years plus?) before it can be called that?

    I am not saying reformulations don't occur, I just find it hard to be calling stuff like Creed Aventus, Chanel Allure Homme, YSL La Nuit, Dior Homme Intense and Musc Ravageur by their "vintage" and modern or current formulation. Seems strange to me.
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  21. #51
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by rum View Post

    I am not saying reformulations don't occur, I just find it hard to be calling stuff like Creed Aventus, Chanel Allure Homme, YSL La Nuit, Dior Homme Intense and Musc Ravageur by their "vintage" and modern or current formulation. Seems strange to me.
    I wonder of that myself.
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  22. #52
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by rum View Post
    I find it hard to believe that in this thread we're referring to "vintages" of scents that have only been around ten or 20 years. Surely to be called "vintage" something has to have been around for a longer period of time (say 30 years plus?) before it can be called that?

    I am not saying reformulations don't occur, I just find it hard to be calling stuff like Creed Aventus, Chanel Allure Homme, YSL La Nuit, Dior Homme Intense and Musc Ravageur by their "vintage" and modern or current formulation. Seems strange to me.
    I understand what you are saying. I believe I used the term "vintage" rather loosely. By "vintage", I mean the original fragrance before it was reformulated, regardless of how long it's been around. Perhaps I should have used the word "original" instead of "vintage." I believe it may be too late for me to edit the title of this thread.

  23. #53
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by LatinNote View Post
    I understand what you are saying. I believe I used the term "vintage" rather loosely. By "vintage", I mean the original fragrance before it was reformulated, regardless of how long it's been around. Perhaps I should have used the word "original" instead of "vintage." I believe it may be too late for me to edit the title of this thread.
    Hi LatinNote. Your title is fine in my opinion and needs no alteration. It's just a matter of clarifying what we deem to be 'vintage'. That's open to discussion here in my opinion.

    It's perfectly acceptable to be criticising the reformulation of something like, say, Eau Sauvage. It was originally released in 1966 if my memory serves me well. It was a superb scent until it got ruined by reformulations in the late 2000s/2010s. In this case, Eau Sauvage definitely qualifies to be called a 'vintage' scent.

    Something like Musc Ravageur however, which has been barely out 19 years does not qualify in my opinion. The formula may well have been tweaked since its original release in 2000, but it's relatively young age compared to the above example means it can't be called 'vintage'. Same applies to Aventus, D&G, Allure Homme, YSL La Nuit and DHI.

    Am I alone in my thinking?
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  24. #54
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by rum View Post
    Am I alone in my thinking?
    I think you're idea of a vintage fragrance would be something that no longer fits the trends of today. Correct me if I'm wrong?
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  25. #55
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by rum View Post
    Hi LatinNote. Your title is fine in my opinion and needs no alteration. It's just a matter of clarifying what we deem to be 'vintage'. That's open to discussion here in my opinion.

    It's perfectly acceptable to be criticising the reformulation of something like, say, Eau Sauvage. It was originally released in 1966 if my memory serves me well. It was a superb scent until it got ruined by reformulations in the late 2000s/2010s. In this case, Eau Sauvage definitely qualifies to be called a 'vintage' scent.

    Something like Musc Ravageur however, which has been barely out 19 years does not qualify in my opinion. The formula may well have been tweaked since its original release in 2000, but it's relatively young age compared to the above example means it can't be called 'vintage'. Same applies to Aventus, D&G, Allure Homme, YSL La Nuit and DHI.

    Am I alone in my thinking?
    Thank you Rum. I understand clearly your point, and it gave me a better perspective IMO. I agree with the clarification. Thank you. Now that I think of it, I'd rather use the term original, makes more sense to me. With all due respect to the others as well, of course, a lot of this is based on opinion.
    As for the Eau Sauvage, I have only tried the recent variation and was not impressed. I couldn't understand the hype surrounding it. It perhaps alludes to the fact of the deviation from the original.
    You are obviously not alone in this thinking.

  26. #56
    Super Member LatinNote's Avatar
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by N.CAL Fragrance Reviewer View Post
    I think you're idea of a vintage fragrance would be something that no longer fits the trends of today. Correct me if I'm wrong?
    Good question. I personally believe that some fragrances that "no longer fits the trends of today" can be challenged and be accepted again. I know that's a tall order, but challenges should be welcomed.

  27. #57

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by ILikePeeps View Post
    Ha, I had a bottle of Fleurs d'Oranger before and to me it smelled just like the tree in my Dad's backyard when I'd go out there and mow it. I read about cumin and I was confused, like... "...is there? I don't pick up on cumin..". Might explain it!
    Yes, I was rather disappointed. I wanted the slightly raunchy white floral from my sample, and got a clean one instead. It's still a good fragrance though.

  28. #58
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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by Palmolive View Post
    FM Musc Ravageur - One I haven't smelled the original incarnation of but if the word on the scentsphere is anything to go by the reform is actually the scent done right as it polishes off all of the rough edges and general abrasiveness of the first incarnation whilst allowing the best aspects to shine. Anyone who has smelled both care to opine?
    I've tried both. There is a civet note that is nearly missing from new versions I've tried. Both smell fantastic. You can tell they are the same frag, just a bit pissier. I prefer the urine.
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  29. #59

    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Quote Originally Posted by notspendingamillion View Post
    I've tried both. There is a civet note that is nearly missing from new versions I've tried. Both smell fantastic. You can tell they are the same frag, just a bit pissier. I prefer the urine.
    Looks like I can take that one off my "to try" list as I'm not a fan of skank, in any of its forms, and find the current version to be quite wonderful!

    Quote Originally Posted by rum View Post
    I am not saying reformulations don't occur, I just find it hard to be calling stuff like Creed Aventus, Chanel Allure Homme, YSL La Nuit, Dior Homme Intense and Musc Ravageur by their "vintage" and modern or current formulation. Seems strange to me.
    It all depends on how you define "Vintage" doesn't it? Some use it to refer to scents of a bygone era and others to the original formulation of any fragrance that has been ravaged by time and regulations therefore both are valid interpretations so whats the problem?

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    Default Re: Reformulated Fragrances That Are Most Different From Their Vintage Counterparts

    Tuscan Leather has undergone a change!
    Invasion Barbare was diluted as well !




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